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John Seymour

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NEWS
October 19, 1989 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO
Anaheim Republican state Sen. John Seymour was dressing for a political function Tuesday afternoon in his room at San Francisco's El Drisco Hotel when the 6.9-magnitude temblor struck. The furniture began to move. Something crashed from a table. "The immediate thought was, 'My God, this is the heavy one,' " said Seymour, who was in the Bay Area city with his wife, Judy, for a fund-raiser for U.S. Sen. Pete Wilson (R-Calif.) " 'We're on the fourth floor and we've got to get out of here.'
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 2012 | By Ann M. Simmons, Los Angeles Times
When Martha Forth first saw the one-room rural schoolhouse where she would land her first teaching job in 1938, her heart sank. "I thought, I can't do this," recalled Forth, then 23 and a university graduate with a teaching credential from USC. The building stood in a field in the remote Leona Valley, about 10 miles west of Palmdale. There were a couple of outhouses, a windmill that pumped water to the building and no electricity. But Forth knew she had to take the job. It was August.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1991
Gov.-elect Pete Wilson threaded the eye of a political needle on Wednesday by naming state Sen. John Seymour (R-Anaheim) as his successor in the U.S. Senate. If Seymour will not strike many as an utterly inspired choice, he is a more than solid, middle-of-the-road selection. He passes muster on a number of qualifications, such as Wilson's interest in finding someone who favored abortion rights but who also had a fighting chance of holding the seat for the Republicans.
BUSINESS
May 14, 1994 | DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When William E. Cooper, a politically well-connected real estate investor, bought politician John Seymour's real estate brokerage in 1981, he said he hoped to emulate the giants of Wall Street finance. This may not be what he had in mind. Federal investigators revealed Friday that First Pension Corp., Cooper's Orange County pension management firm, may have lost or misappropriated as much as $124 million in client funds.
BUSINESS
May 14, 1994 | DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When William E. Cooper, a politically well-connected real estate investor, bought politician John Seymour's real estate brokerage in 1981, he said he hoped to emulate the giants of Wall Street finance. This may not be what he had in mind. Federal investigators revealed Friday that First Pension Corp., Cooper's Orange County pension management firm, may have lost or misappropriated as much as $124 million in client funds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 1993 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A party was going on, but John Seymour wasn't there. Instead, the former U.S. senator from California was home watching TV images of his erstwhile colleagues back in Washington flash by during a presidential address to Congress. There was a tug of nostalgia, a wistful moment--but no remorse. "I said to my wife: It's good in a lot of ways to be out of there," Seymour recalled. "It's a chapter of my life that's written and done."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1991 | MARIA NEWMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
County Supervisor Gaddi H. Vasquez, considered by some to be the strongest potential candidate to fill the vacancy left by state Sen. John Seymour's appointment to the U.S. Senate, said Friday he will not run for that office. Vasquez said family considerations were the biggest factors in his decision not to pursue the 35th Senate District seat in a March special election. He did not rule out, however, the possibility of future candidacies for either statewide or national positions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1991 | DAVE LESHER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
They've waited and waited and waited. Now, finally, there is a rare opening in the state Senate, and it has set off a scramble among several of Orange County's most eager political climbers. With the appointment of former Anaheim state Sen. John Seymour last month to the U.S. Senate, the downside of holding office in Orange County's safe Republican territory is underscored: Turnover is slow. Nearly half of the county's Assembly members have applied for this promotion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1991 | DAVE LESHER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
A group of prominent Republicans working on behalf of Assemblyman John R. Lewis (R-Orange) have encouraged several GOP candidates to drop out of the upcoming special election to replace former Anaheim state Sen. John Seymour. One candidate said the repeated calls were "intimidating," while another was offered support for a future race in return for withdrawing from the March 19 special primary that follows Seymour's recent appointment to the U.S. Senate.
NEWS
March 14, 1990 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Psssst. Here's California's best-kept political secret: There are a couple of people running for the Republican nomination to the second-highest office in California. They're both state senators from Orange County. They want to be lieutenant governor. Their names are Marian Bergeson and John Seymour. Odds are, you didn't know that, even though both candidates have been running hard for the good part of a year now. Bergeson is from Newport Beach. Nice woman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1994 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a hilly section of this affluent town, William E. Cooper bought a 3,400-square-foot house in a gated community by raising money the same way he did in business. He got it from investors. Those who helped by lending him money were eventually paid back. But 8,000 investors are wondering if they will recoup $350 million they put into the labyrinth of companies under Cooper's First Diversified Financial Services in Irvine. Cooper's First Pension Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1993 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former state Sen. Alan Robbins testified Wednesday that he and lobbyist Clay Jackson in 1991 discussed persuading then-U. S. Sen. John Seymour to use his influence to derail the prospective appointment of a tough U.S. attorney who would probably prosecute Robbins. Robbins said the strategy was discussed at a "series of meetings" between him and Jackson.
NEWS
October 11, 1993 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A party was going on, but John Seymour wasn't there. Instead, the former U.S. senator from California sat in his home watching TV images of his erstwhile colleagues back in Washington flash by during a presidential address to Congress. There was a tug of nostalgia, a wistful moment--but no remorse. "I said to my wife, 'It's good in a lot of ways to be out of there,' " Seymour recalled. "It's a chapter of my life that's written and done."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 1993 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A party was going on, but John Seymour wasn't there. Instead, the former U.S. senator from California was home watching TV images of his erstwhile colleagues back in Washington flash by during a presidential address to Congress. There was a tug of nostalgia, a wistful moment--but no remorse. "I said to my wife: It's good in a lot of ways to be out of there," Seymour recalled. "It's a chapter of my life that's written and done."
NEWS
December 22, 1992 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Republican U.S. Sen. John Seymour, defeated for election by Dianne Feinstein last month, was appointed by Gov. Pete Wilson on Monday to direct the state's $5-billion loan program for low- and moderate-income housing. As executive director of the California Housing Finance Agency, Seymour, subject to expected routine confirmation by the state Senate, will be paid $98,076 a year, which reflects a 5% salary cut the governor has urged his appointees to take in tough economic times.
NEWS
November 5, 1992 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By the time a dejected John Seymour conceded defeat to Dianne Feinstein late Tuesday and made the long walk through a gantlet of reporters into private life, the longtime Orange County politician was talking about public office in the past tense. "Oh, there are a lot of exciting things to do," he said about his future plans. "I had a life before politics. I was in business for 17 years and now I've had a very successful career in politics. "Maybe I'll do some teaching."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1994 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a hilly section of this affluent town, William E. Cooper bought a 3,400-square-foot house in a gated community by raising money the same way he did in business. He got it from investors. Those who helped by lending him money were eventually paid back. But 8,000 investors are wondering if they will recoup $350 million they put into the labyrinth of companies under Cooper's First Diversified Financial Services in Irvine. Cooper's First Pension Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1991 | DAVE LESHER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
In a low-key election, typical campaign strategy is to identify the voters most likely to support your candidate and quietly but repeatedly urge them to the polls. That's what's happening now in the campaign to replace former Anaheim state Sen. John Seymour. Except for a few lawn signs, the race is almost invisible. But like miners digging for votes, the candidates are sending letters and making phone calls to the relative handful of voters most sympathetic to their issues.
NEWS
November 5, 1992 | DEAN E. MURPHY and TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A day after scoring stunning victories and establishing their unique place in history, the winners of California's dual U.S. Senate races, Democrats Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer, went their separate ways Wednesday. Feinstein assumed her official role while Boxer headed for a four-day vacation in Hawaii. Feinstein, basking in the glow of her 17-point drubbing of incumbent Republican Sen. John Seymour, was informed by the secretary to the Senate that she is to take office almost immediately.
NEWS
November 5, 1992 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Republican Bruce Herschensohn's final surrender in the U.S. Senate race came in the early morning Wednesday, when he phoned opponent Barbara Boxer and congratulated her on her win. By 2 a.m., late returns from heavily Democratic San Francisco had come in, and by then the man who was the Republicans' last chance to win one of California's two Senate seats was knocked out of the game.
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