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NEWS
April 18, 1994 | MICHAEL HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Historical fact: Los Angeles stole the Owens Valley's water. Nobody argues otherwise. Even Hollywood, one of the indirect beneficiaries of the crime, lifted it out of history and into the popular imagination with "Chinatown." Yet a crime so huge seems beyond rectifying. Who would dismantle the city to make the desert green again? We can't spit out what the L.A. oligarchy--including The Times--did in the 1920s, any more than we can swallow it. It sticks in our craw.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2007 | Josh Getlin, Times Staff Writer
Imagine a noir thriller where a cynical cop turns to a private eye and says: "Jake, it's Koreatown." Picture a Southern California mystery series where the hero chases intrigue not in Hollywood but in Glendale, in the Armenian community; in Orange County, among the Vietnamese; among satanic cults in Bakersfield; and surfers in Palos Verdes. In John Shannon's literary world, the neo-noir thriller is more than a lazy weekend read.
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BOOKS
June 2, 1996 | Michael Harris, Michael Harris is a regular columnist for Book Review
Call them whydunits--mystery novels with a progressive political slant. In "The Concrete River," John Shannon writes of a contemporary Los Angeles with rainy winter skies, "abandoned plants," idle fishing boats, "a slum that rivaled South Africa" and residents infected by a "grievance they can't put their finger on," a "disease of anger."
BOOKS
July 10, 2005 | Dick Lochte, Dick Lochte is a critic of crime fiction and author of the suspense thriller "Sleeping Dog."
John Shannon's "Dangerous Games" is that rara avis -- a beautifully plotted, character-rich crime novel, both hard-edged and humorous, that is as spot-on in portraying today's Southern California as Raymond Chandler's books were in his day, while paying considerably more attention to the area's ethnic neighborhoods.
OPINION
March 7, 1999
Re "The Second Coming of the L.A. River," by Robert Jones, Feb. 21: At last! The L.A. River may flow once again. Your story was encouraging. I just finished reading a mystery book by John Shannon, "The Concrete River," in which he accurately describes the dumping ground the river has become. BARBARA HADE KAPLAN, Los Angeles
BOOKS
July 10, 2005 | Dick Lochte, Dick Lochte is a critic of crime fiction and author of the suspense thriller "Sleeping Dog."
John Shannon's "Dangerous Games" is that rara avis -- a beautifully plotted, character-rich crime novel, both hard-edged and humorous, that is as spot-on in portraying today's Southern California as Raymond Chandler's books were in his day, while paying considerably more attention to the area's ethnic neighborhoods.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2007 | Josh Getlin, Times Staff Writer
Imagine a noir thriller where a cynical cop turns to a private eye and says: "Jake, it's Koreatown." Picture a Southern California mystery series where the hero chases intrigue not in Hollywood but in Glendale, in the Armenian community; in Orange County, among the Vietnamese; among satanic cults in Bakersfield; and surfers in Palos Verdes. In John Shannon's literary world, the neo-noir thriller is more than a lazy weekend read.
BOOKS
June 15, 2003 | Eugen Weber, Eugen Weber is a contributing writer to Book Review.
The visible body count in Denise Hamilton's "Sugar Skull" is relatively limited; the traditional unities of place, time and action are only slightly stretched; but the lust, greed and turmoil are exhilarating. Vincent Chevalier, a sound engineer, breaks through the security of the Los Angeles Times to seek reporter Eve Diamond's help in locating his 15-year-old daughter, Isabel, who has disappeared from home.
NATIONAL
October 25, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Discovery's astronauts used lasers and digital cameras to examine the space shuttle's wings for any signs of launch damage, officials said at Cape Canaveral. The inspection is standard procedure, but it's an even higher priority this time because of questions about possible flaws in three wing panels. John Shannon, head of the mission management team, said a preliminary look at the images revealed nothing of significance.
NEWS
May 3, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A crucial hydraulic system malfunctioned aboard space shuttle Columbia, leaving the astronauts with less power than they would like for their ride home. NASA said the problem would not jeopardize the safety of the seven-member crew during today's landing--unless another hydraulic system fails. "I don't consider it to be really any additional risk," flight director John Shannon said at Kennedy Space Center.
BOOKS
June 15, 2003 | Eugen Weber, Eugen Weber is a contributing writer to Book Review.
The visible body count in Denise Hamilton's "Sugar Skull" is relatively limited; the traditional unities of place, time and action are only slightly stretched; but the lust, greed and turmoil are exhilarating. Vincent Chevalier, a sound engineer, breaks through the security of the Los Angeles Times to seek reporter Eve Diamond's help in locating his 15-year-old daughter, Isabel, who has disappeared from home.
OPINION
March 7, 1999
Re "The Second Coming of the L.A. River," by Robert Jones, Feb. 21: At last! The L.A. River may flow once again. Your story was encouraging. I just finished reading a mystery book by John Shannon, "The Concrete River," in which he accurately describes the dumping ground the river has become. BARBARA HADE KAPLAN, Los Angeles
BOOKS
June 2, 1996 | Michael Harris, Michael Harris is a regular columnist for Book Review
Call them whydunits--mystery novels with a progressive political slant. In "The Concrete River," John Shannon writes of a contemporary Los Angeles with rainy winter skies, "abandoned plants," idle fishing boats, "a slum that rivaled South Africa" and residents infected by a "grievance they can't put their finger on," a "disease of anger."
NEWS
April 18, 1994 | MICHAEL HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Historical fact: Los Angeles stole the Owens Valley's water. Nobody argues otherwise. Even Hollywood, one of the indirect beneficiaries of the crime, lifted it out of history and into the popular imagination with "Chinatown." Yet a crime so huge seems beyond rectifying. Who would dismantle the city to make the desert green again? We can't spit out what the L.A. oligarchy--including The Times--did in the 1920s, any more than we can swallow it. It sticks in our craw.
NATIONAL
August 10, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Schoolteacher-turned-astronaut Barbara Morgan helped operate a 100-foot robot arm and extension boom in a hunt for damage on her first full day in orbit, as NASA officials at Cape Canaveral said foam insulation may have hit the shuttle at launch. Nine pieces of insulation broke off the fuel tank during liftoff Wednesday evening, and three pieces appeared to strike the shuttle, said John Shannon, chairman of the mission management team.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1998
The City Council has hired a consulting firm to help it find a replacement for City Manager Jim Morrison, who plans to go into semiretirement later this year. The city has hired Sacramento-based John Shannon & Associates to conduct the search. City officials anticipate that it will take about five months to fill the city's top job. Morrison has committed to staying with the city until the end of the fiscal year June 30.
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