Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJohn Shearin
IN THE NEWS

John Shearin

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1989 | RAY LOYND
A female peace activist verbally attacked the playwright in the alley outside the theater. On another occasion, a Vietnam veteran remained in his seat after the performance, reduced to tears. Yet again, another patron followed the actors backstage, seeking out a confrontation with the cast. The circumstance triggering this behavior is a pair of haunting one acts about post-Vietnam stress, "Sleeping Dogs/Dinky Dau" at Theatre/Theater in Hollywood.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1989 | RAY LOYND
A female peace activist verbally attacked the playwright in the alley outside the theater. On another occasion, a Vietnam veteran remained in his seat after the performance, reduced to tears. Yet again, another patron followed the actors backstage, seeking out a confrontation with the cast. The circumstance triggering this behavior is a pair of haunting one acts about post-Vietnam stress, "Sleeping Dogs/Dinky Dau" at Theatre/Theater in Hollywood.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 1989 | RAY LOYND
The solo performance genre flowered in '89, particularly when the material created a dramatic world instead of a single personality. The best one-person production I saw was Chazz Palminteri's "A Bronx Tale," with Palminteri mercurially shifting guises among a dozen neighborhood characters in a tour de force that opened at the West Coast Ensemble and moved to Theatre West.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 1989 | RAY LOYND
Dinky Dau, in playwright John Shearin's one-act of the same title, is Vietnam War slang for going crazy in the heat and fear of battle. And don't say "'Nam" if you didn't fight there, if you never felt dinky dau, shouts an infuriated vet as he grabs the throat of an ex-Berkeley radical. "To you, it's Vietnam. Say it! Viet-nam!"
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1989 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
There are several factors that work against Doris Baizley's new play, "My Rebel." For one, the A Directors' Theatre production it receives at the Lex under the direction of Evelyn Purcell is competent, nothing more. For another, it is a play about events surrounding a group of friends, Vietnam-era peace activists. The Vietnam War left a tragic legacy among vets who returned to a country that was less than grateful for the pains they took, right or wrong.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 1989 | JANICE ARKATOV
"A few years ago I started thinking about Vietnam," recalled playwright Doris Baizley. "It was just before 'Platoon' came out; I don't know what precipitated it. I think it was just one of those things we haven't wanted to think about that suddenly starts appearing. For me, it was a very big thing that happened in my past. . . . The ramifications now are how it changed our lives." Baizley (author of the '50s-set comedy "Mrs.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 1989 | ROBERT KOEHLER
Just as "Chinatown" started out as a standard gumshoe yarn and resolved with a serious case of the Oedipal complex, so Quincy Long's "The Johnstown Vindicator," at Theatre/Theater, opens as a rough-and-ready newspaper room comedy and turns into . . . well, something else. Long has concocted a perverse, anti-whodunit, but not all the ingredients mix well. From the very first scene, for instance, anyone paying attention has to be suspicious of Eve Brenner's sicko mother.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|