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John Shelby

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2005 | Larry B. Stammer, Times Staff Writer
The protests started as soon as playwright Colin Cox e-mailed churches to announce the opening Sunday of his new play on the life of controversial Episcopal Bishop John Shelby Spong. "I can't tell you how excited I was to get your e-mail," went one sardonic reply. "I misread it and thought that Bishop Spong had died and was being memorialized in the play. Sadly, I was mistaken." At 74, Spong, the retired bishop of Newark, N.J.
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SPORTS
December 30, 1989
When Tommy Lasorda was confronted with the strikeout record of their new acquisition, Juan Samuel, he said, "We will help him make the necessary adjustments in that, too." If they can do that for Samuel, how come they never made the necessary adjustments for John Shelby? FREDERICK D. MULLEN Upland
SPORTS
February 25, 2002 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First base coach John Shelby, absent for the first week and a half of spring training, joined the Dodgers on Sunday, nine days after his 14-year-old son, Jeremy, was diagnosed with Hodgkin's disease. Shelby and his wife, Trina, who live in Lexington, Ky., became concerned when they found a lump on the side of Jeremy's neck and noticed he was experiencing a shortness of breath when he played basketball.
SPORTS
July 14, 1988 | Jim Murray
It was the eighth inning of a tie game. Two men were on, and two were out. Mike Marshall was at bat for the Dodgers. In the on-deck circle, John Shelby watched impassively as the St. Louis pitcher, John Tudor, intentionally walked Marshall to get at him. Shelby calmly walked up there and stroked the game-winning hit to left-center.
SPORTS
September 4, 1987 | Jim Murray
John Shelby knows that he isn't Babe Ruth. Knows, in fact, that he isn't even Babe Herman. If you don't think this is unusual, you don't know ballplayers. All golfers think they are two to five shots better than they are. And all ballplayers think they're 20 percentage points better than the book shows.
SPORTS
April 23, 1989 | Jim Murray
It was the bottom of the second inning of a scoreless game. Two were out, nobody was on and the Cincinnati Reds' no-hit pitcher, Tom Browning, was throwing strikes. He got two of them to the Dodger batter, John Shelby, but then, Shelby hit what appeared to be a routine ground ball down the third-base line. Protocol calls for the batter in this situation to throw his bat in disgust and lope down to first base in a symbolic trot, gnashing his teeth. But Shelby took off as if a posse were chasing him. He crossed the bag a split second before the throw.
SPORTS
July 21, 1988 | SAM McMANIS
Dodger center fielder John Shelby was put on the 15-day disabled list Wednesday after being hit in the right eye by a foul ball ricocheting off the plate during the fourth inning of the Dodgers' 8-7 loss to the St. Louis Cardinals. Shelby, scheduled to return to Los Angeles from Pittsburgh today for another examination, has been told by local doctors not to play for at least 3 to 5 days. Shelby suffered a scratch of the right eyeball, and he said his vision was slightly impaired.
SPORTS
December 20, 1989 | BILL PLASCHKE
Two players who once thought their Dodger days were over returned to the team Tuesday when backup catcher Rick Dempsey was sent a non-guaranteed contract and free-agent outfielder John Shelby signed a similar deal. In another expected move, the Dodgers did not offer a contract to outfielder Mike Davis. Dempsey's return, which was in doubt because of his .179 batting average last season, was a tribute to the veteran's influence and defense.
SPORTS
January 15, 1988 | ROSS NEWHAN
With 13 Dodgers eligible for salary arbitration, Executive Vice President Fred Claire Thursday came to terms with three, center fielder John Shelby, pitcher Tim Leary and infielder Mariano Duncan. Shelby agreed to a one-year contract that gives the club an option on a second year. He will earn $465,000, compared to the $300,000 he made last year, when he was acquired from the Baltimore Orioles and batted .277 with 21 homers and 69 runs batted in, his best season.
SPORTS
April 16, 2000 | TIM BROWN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his last at-bat on the day he turned 18, Cal Ripken singled to right field. It wasn't much of a hit, as John Shelby recalled. It fluttered over the head of a second baseman, then dropped at the feet of a right fielder. But, a run scored, the game-winner for the Bluefield Orioles, a rookie-league team that played in West Virginia's Appalachian Mountains. Ripken didn't find it at all routine. When he came off the field, his gray-blue eyes were wide and proud, his face alight in joy.
SPORTS
September 30, 1998 | JASON REID, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The reorganization of the Dodgers continued Tuesday when Manager Glenn Hoffman and his coaching staff were removed by General Manager Kevin Malone, club sources said. Hoffman and coaches Manny Mota, Joe Amalfitano, Mike Scioscia, Charlie Hough, Mickey Hatcher and John Shelby will be offered positions in the organization. The move, which had been expected since Malone assumed control of baseball operations three weeks ago, paves the way for the Dodgers to pursue Felipe Alou of the Montreal Expos.
SPORTS
June 25, 1998 | JASON REID, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The rapid-fire change that has marked the Dodgers' disappointing season continued Wednesday night when new Manager Glenn Hoffman made several changes in his coaching staff. Hoffman dramatically reconfigured the on-field management team he inherited Monday from fired manager Bill Russell when he replaced three-fifths of his coaching staff after the Dodgers' interleague game with the Angels at Dodger Stadium, the third of four between the teams this season.
SPORTS
August 12, 1997 | BILL PLASCHKE
Shoulders of black, white and brown brush in a cramped clubhouse that, on this syrupy August night, is the color of contentment. The tattooed Texan hugs a black man from Kansas City. A Puerto Rican clutches the hands of a Tennessean. The Mexican-American trainer is howling at a joke told by the black manager. Whether they know it or not, the Savannah Sand Gnats are fixin' to have a party. Through the door rush five women. "Cover up! Cover up!" the players shout. "Relax!"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1996 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Even in his own church there are those who call the bishop a heretic. He has questioned the virginity of Mary, denied the bodily resurrection of Jesus, and heaped scorn on a literal reading of the Bible. Now the Rt. Rev.
SPORTS
April 16, 2000 | TIM BROWN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his last at-bat on the day he turned 18, Cal Ripken singled to right field. It wasn't much of a hit, as John Shelby recalled. It fluttered over the head of a second baseman, then dropped at the feet of a right fielder. But, a run scored, the game-winner for the Bluefield Orioles, a rookie-league team that played in West Virginia's Appalachian Mountains. Ripken didn't find it at all routine. When he came off the field, his gray-blue eyes were wide and proud, his face alight in joy.
SPORTS
September 3, 1989 | ROSS NEWHAN, Times Staff Writer
The final month of a forgettable season is nothing more than a salary and/or survival drive for many Dodgers. For John Shelby, with his contract up and his career threatened by a strikeout siege that resulted in his midseason exile to Albuquerque, it is a little of both. In Saturday night's second game of September, a still sputtering Shelby put the drive in gear.
SPORTS
December 30, 1989
When Tommy Lasorda was confronted with the strikeout record of their new acquisition, Juan Samuel, he said, "We will help him make the necessary adjustments in that, too." If they can do that for Samuel, how come they never made the necessary adjustments for John Shelby? FREDERICK D. MULLEN Upland
SPORTS
December 20, 1989 | BILL PLASCHKE
Two players who once thought their Dodger days were over returned to the team Tuesday when backup catcher Rick Dempsey was sent a non-guaranteed contract and free-agent outfielder John Shelby signed a similar deal. In another expected move, the Dodgers did not offer a contract to outfielder Mike Davis. Dempsey's return, which was in doubt because of his .179 batting average last season, was a tribute to the veteran's influence and defense.
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