Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJohn Simon
IN THE NEWS

John Simon

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1994 | STEVE HOCHMAN
As a record producer, John Simon is probably best known for nursing the American-baroque eccentricities of the Band's first albums. In his own charmingly eccentric solo show at the Largo on Tuesday, he showed in his own music an allegiance to that ultimate bastion of baroque Americana--Tin Pan Alley. Anyone expecting music like the Band's might have been disappointed.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
May 1, 2013 | By Stuart Pfeifer, Los Angeles Times
Herbalife Ltd. said it had to scale back plans to repurchase its shares after KPMG resigned in early April as its auditor and withdrew its review of the company's annual financial statements for the last three years. The Los Angeles nutritional products company canceled plans to borrow money that "would have been used to repurchase a meaningful amount of company stock," John DeSimone, Herbalife chief financial officer, told analysts Tuesday in a conference call. KPMG withdrew its approval of Herbalife's 2010, 2011 and 2012 financial statements after the accounting giant accused a senior partner of insider trading in the shares of Herbalife, footwear maker Skechers USA Inc. and other companies.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2005 | Christopher Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
Theater critic John Simon, famed and feared over four decades for his slashing pen, has been handed his walking papers by New York magazine -- three days shy of his 80th birthday -- amid a volley of kind words from the editor who let him go. "Great admirer ... courage as a critic ... powerful prose ... will be missed," said the statement of Adam Moss, New York magazine editor in chief since February 2004.
BOOKS
November 20, 2005 | Richard Schickel, Richard Schickel is a contributing writer to Book Review and film critic for Time. He is the author of many books, including, most recently, "Elia Kazan: A Biography."
----- On Film Criticism 1982-2001 John Simon Applause Books: 662 pp., $29.95 ----- On Theater Criticism 1974-2003 John Simon Applause Books: 838 pp., $32.95 ----- On Music Criticism 1979-2005 John Simon Applause Books: 504 pp., $27.95 ----- IT is now 32 years since actress Sylvia Miles permanently entered the lore of the literati by dumping a plate of pasta on the head of John Simon, who happened to be dining near her in a New York restaurant.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN and Claudia Puig, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
A top New York drama critic has received harsh notices after suggesting that actors in a new production of Shakespeare's "Winter's Tale" are too Jewish and too black for the bard. Colleen Dewhurst, Actors Equity president, and the play's producer, Joseph Papp, have both demanded that New York magazine critic John Simon be fired for his remarks.
BOOKS
November 20, 2005 | Richard Schickel, Richard Schickel is a contributing writer to Book Review and film critic for Time. He is the author of many books, including, most recently, "Elia Kazan: A Biography."
----- On Film Criticism 1982-2001 John Simon Applause Books: 662 pp., $29.95 ----- On Theater Criticism 1974-2003 John Simon Applause Books: 838 pp., $32.95 ----- On Music Criticism 1979-2005 John Simon Applause Books: 504 pp., $27.95 ----- IT is now 32 years since actress Sylvia Miles permanently entered the lore of the literati by dumping a plate of pasta on the head of John Simon, who happened to be dining near her in a New York restaurant.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1985
In Stage Wire (April 6), Dan Sullivan referred to Liz Smith's report in the New York Daily News of John Simon's "highly uncomplimentary remark regarding 'homosexuals in the theater.' " Sullivan was concerned with whether it is "cricket to report remarks made by exasperated theater critics in theater lobbies." I wish to applaud Sullivan's keen sense of priorities and sensitivity to important issues. Smith reported that Simon had said "Homosexuals in the theater! My God, I can't wait until AIDS gets all of them."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 1985 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
"Ho Hum, Another Simon Smash," says Variety this week, pretending not to care. Actually, Broadway has been praying for a hit this spring, and Neil Simon's "Biloxi Blues" seems to be it. To show you how enthusiastic the New York critics were about Simon's barracks comedy (seen at the Ahmanson this winter), even John Simon liked it, praising the way Simon had bonded the jokes to a thoughtful theme of self-discovery.
SPORTS
November 14, 1999
RUSHING *--* Player, Team No Yds TD THOMAS JONES, Virginia 32 221 1 JOHN MOSLEY, Tulsa 17 216 1 RON DAYNE, Wisconsin 27 216 1 MIKE ANDERSON, Utah 32 204 0 CEDRIC WASHINGTON, B.C.
BOOKS
November 12, 1989 | Michael Harris
One rainy Monday morning during the Reagan era, John Fairchild, publisher of Women's Wear Daily and W, had a doleful thought: "There's been a big change in society; today it's all money and power and greed." His response was typical. Having spotted a trend, he gave the Donald Trumps and their ilk a label, "Nouvelle Society," and soon exulted: "Before we knew it, people were secretly--and not so secretly--labeling their friends. It's moments like these that make it all worthwhile."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2005 | Christopher Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
Theater critic John Simon, famed and feared over four decades for his slashing pen, has been handed his walking papers by New York magazine -- three days shy of his 80th birthday -- amid a volley of kind words from the editor who let him go. "Great admirer ... courage as a critic ... powerful prose ... will be missed," said the statement of Adam Moss, New York magazine editor in chief since February 2004.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2004 | Merle Rubin, Special to The Times
The photograph on the cover of Maureen O'Hara's lively memoir summons up an era of movie stars that is light-years away from today's: an age of long, undulant red tresses, of swashbucklers and action heroines, above all of a particular brand of glamour. In the words of the great Irish poet, W.B. Yeats: "A thing never seen again."
SPORTS
November 14, 1999
RUSHING *--* Player, Team No Yds TD THOMAS JONES, Virginia 32 221 1 JOHN MOSLEY, Tulsa 17 216 1 RON DAYNE, Wisconsin 27 216 1 MIKE ANDERSON, Utah 32 204 0 CEDRIC WASHINGTON, B.C.
BOOKS
June 20, 1999 | EUGEN WEBER, Eugen Weber is the author, most recently, of "Apocalypses: Prophecies, Cults, and Millennial Beliefs through the Ages."
Born round the mid-19th century, detective stories replaced the deteriorating magic of the supernatural. Witchcraft, spells, ghosts and fairies were fading. Crime stories re-created mystery when mystery was waning: The dark forests of robbers and witches gave way to the somber thickets of criminal souls, the exoticism of unexplored wastes translated into the hunting grounds of native ogres. John Connolly provides ogres aplenty. And witches, too. Gripping is a word that should be used sparingly.
BOOKS
January 28, 1996 | Clay Morgan, Clay Morgan is author of the novel "Santiago and the Drinking Party." He is collaborating with artist Nick Bantock on a novel titled "Carta Rosa: A Love Story with Maps."
John Vernon's historical novel "All for Love: Baby Doe and Silver Dollar" could more aptly be titled "All for Naught," but that wouldn't sell many copies. For nothing were the motivations and maneuvers of the Colorado Cleopatra who went from rags to riches to rags. For nothing would have been her final mad musings if they had not been mined by Vernon. Author of the acclaimed "Peter Doyle," Vernon again displays his grasp of history and his talent for fiction.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1994 | STEVE HOCHMAN
As a record producer, John Simon is probably best known for nursing the American-baroque eccentricities of the Band's first albums. In his own charmingly eccentric solo show at the Largo on Tuesday, he showed in his own music an allegiance to that ultimate bastion of baroque Americana--Tin Pan Alley. Anyone expecting music like the Band's might have been disappointed.
BUSINESS
June 27, 1988 | Michael Flagg, Times Staff Writer
John R. Simon had never even worked on a city council race when he began organizing Citizens For Traffic Solutions, a political action committee that raised $2 million to beat Orange County's slow-growth initiative. Widely expected to pass because of voter frustration with the county's clogged roads, the initiative intimidated many of the builders and developers Simon tried to rally early this year.
BOOKS
August 17, 1986 | Donald Freed, Freed is a playwright and historian. and
John Ranelagh's study of the Central Intelligence Agency is the latest revision in the history of the problematic and secret mechanism that is once again looming behind the rhetoric of America's foreign policy and its war on terrorism. In its way, the work by London author Ranelagh is meticulous in research, detail and chronology. The documentation and range of interviews, together with a huge bibliography, appear to be exhaustive.
BOOKS
April 18, 1993 | Charles Marowitz, Marowitz is a director and author of "Recycling Shakespeare" (Applause Books)
There are only a handful of fictional characters who have managed to cut themselves loose from their original moorings and assume an independent existence in the literal, as opposed to the literary, world. Sherlock Holmes and Don Juan spring to mind, as do Simon Legree and Polyanna. In the theater, Romeo and Hamlet have come to embody universal types, and so has Lothario, a relatively minor character in an obscure drama by Nicholas Rowe.
NEWS
March 12, 1993 | CONSTANCE CASEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What a wonderful title. In a country where the poorest 70 million live on about $500 a year each, and where the police regularly knock off homeless children, what Brazilians really get excited about is the samba. The motive pushing John Krich's book along is to use music as the key for understanding Brazilian society--specifically, how music works "to beautify, distract, console, or entrance a modern melting-pot nation of 150 million."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|