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December 21, 1986
I visited the new Museum of Contemporary Art. The paintings are obviously there to make one think. I thunk the following: Titian, John Singer Sargent, or Gully Jimson could do 8 or 10 paintings with the canvas used for each of many of them. Most of the exhibit is an argument for poverty: an artist who can't afford canvas is naturally more selective. I memorized some of them in five minutes. The Temporary Contemporary building is excellent. Only paintings sprinkled by Peggy Guggenheim with water from the canals of Venice should be admitted until some improvement is shown.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2003 | Ann Conway, Times Staff Writer
Looking every inch like the society women John Singer Sargent painted, philanthropist Iris Cantor was feted at the preview of an exhibition of the late 19th century artist's work at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Sporting an intricately beaded vintage jacket by designer James Galanos, a glittering floral necklace by Van Cleef & Arpels and a Bob Mackie gown, Cantor greeted well-wishers who had come to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the Iris and B.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2003 | Ann Conway, Times Staff Writer
Looking every inch like the society women John Singer Sargent painted, philanthropist Iris Cantor was feted at the preview of an exhibition of the late 19th century artist's work at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Sporting an intricately beaded vintage jacket by designer James Galanos, a glittering floral necklace by Van Cleef & Arpels and a Bob Mackie gown, Cantor greeted well-wishers who had come to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the Iris and B.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1998 | Suzanne Muchnic, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
If there's a single artist whose work connects the Huntington's collections of British and American art, it must be John Singer Sargent. An American, born to expatriates in Florence in 1856, he studied in Florence and Paris, and achieved enormous success in London as a portrait painter in the aristocratic style known as the Grand Manner.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1998 | Suzanne Muchnic, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
If there's a single artist whose work connects the Huntington's collections of British and American art, it must be John Singer Sargent. An American, born to expatriates in Florence in 1856, he studied in Florence and Paris, and achieved enormous success in London as a portrait painter in the aristocratic style known as the Grand Manner.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2004 | From Reuters
A portrait of Scottish author Robert Louis Stevenson by U.S. painter John Singer Sargent sold Wednesday for $8.8 million. Auction house Sotheby's said the 1885 painting, the top lot in the sale, was bought by casino owner Steve Wynn and would be included in his collection of art at Wynn's Las Vegas Resort and Country Club next year.
NEWS
September 13, 1999 | Associated Press
Frederick Law Olmsted, one of the founders of American landscape architecture and the designer of New York's Central Park, was honored Sunday with a 33-cent stamp from the U.S. Postal Service. Olmsted, who lived in Brookline, Mass., designed several parks in the Boston area, including the "Emerald Necklace," a ring of parks around the city. The stamp is a montage that includes a John Singer Sargent portrait of Olmsted, a photograph of Central Park and two of his landscape plans.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1996
A Southern California preview of the fall season at Sotheby's New York will be held today through Friday at the auction house's showroom in Beverly Hills. Highlights from Impressionist, modern and American art sales include paintings by Edvard Munch, Claude Monet, Pablo Picasso, Alfred Sisley, Childe Hassam and John Singer Sargent.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2005 | From Associated Press
The Virginia Museum of Fine Arts will display a portion of more than $100 million in 19th and 20th century oil paintings, pastels and sculptures, a gift from James W. and Frances G. McGlothlin. James McGlothlin is chairman and chief executive officer of United Co., a privately held conglomerate whose businesses range from coal, oil and gas to financial services, industrial-supply distribution and golf courses. He founded the firm as United Coal Co. in 1970.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1995
A Park La Brea art collector has offered to donate his collection of paintings, which he estimates is worth $8 million, to Culver City, including originals by Norman Rockwell, John Singer Sargent, Aguste Rodin and Jose Clemente Orozco. But 1930s tennis star Gene Mako, 79, has attached a couple of conditions.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 1986
I visited the new Museum of Contemporary Art. The paintings are obviously there to make one think. I thunk the following: Titian, John Singer Sargent, or Gully Jimson could do 8 or 10 paintings with the canvas used for each of many of them. Most of the exhibit is an argument for poverty: an artist who can't afford canvas is naturally more selective. I memorized some of them in five minutes. The Temporary Contemporary building is excellent. Only paintings sprinkled by Peggy Guggenheim with water from the canals of Venice should be admitted until some improvement is shown.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2001
What's happening the next few weeks: * "Crumbs From the Table of Joy," about a widower and his daughters who move from Florida to Brooklyn in the 1950s, opens Feb. 10 at the Old Globe Theatre's Cassius Carter Centre Stage, Balboa Park. (619) 239-2255. * Eighteen-year-old award-winning concert pianist Lang Lang will perform a recital of music by Handel, Brahms, Scriabin, Tchaikovsky and Balakirev on Feb. 7 at 4 p.m. at the California Center for the Arts, 340 N. Escondido Blvd., Escondido.
BOOKS
May 12, 1991 | Sonja Bolle
EMINENT GARDENERS: Some People of Influence and Their Gardens, 1880-1980 by Jane Brown (Viking: $22.95; 183 pp.). "Brilliance in gardening is the most intangible aspect of an ephemeral art," writes Jane Brown, whose book intends to preserve as inspiration to other gardeners the genius of such legends as the Lords Fairhaven, Huttleston and Henry, fraternal creators of, respectively, grand and exquisite English gardens.
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