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John Singleton

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2014 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
The biopic of slain rapper Tupac Shakur finally has a director. John Singleton has signed on to rewrite, direct and produce the long-gestating film, according to Variety . Singleton was previously linked to the project years ago, but the deal fell through, adding to one of several hurdles that stalled the project. Last year, as fans were mourning the anniversary of Shakur's death at age 25 due to complications after a 1996 drive-by shooting in Las Vegas, news broke that the often-delayed project had gained new steam.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
Open Road Films will distribute "Tupac," a movie about the late rapper and actor Tupac Shakur to be directed by John Singleton ("Boyz N the Hood," "2 Fast 2 Furious"), the studio announced Wednesday. Written by Singleton with Jeremy Haft and Ed Gonzalez (the last two penned the 2011 direct-to-video crime drama "Street Kings 2"), "Tupac" will chronicle the life and legacy of the influential rapper, who has sold more than 75 million albums. Born in Harlem in 1971, Shakur moved to the San Francisco Bay Area in 1988 and eventually signed with Los Angeles-based Death Row Records, under which he became a lightning rod in the East Coast-West Coast hip-hop feud of the 1990s.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
Open Road Films will distribute "Tupac," a movie about the late rapper and actor Tupac Shakur to be directed by John Singleton ("Boyz N the Hood," "2 Fast 2 Furious"), the studio announced Wednesday. Written by Singleton with Jeremy Haft and Ed Gonzalez (the last two penned the 2011 direct-to-video crime drama "Street Kings 2"), "Tupac" will chronicle the life and legacy of the influential rapper, who has sold more than 75 million albums. Born in Harlem in 1971, Shakur moved to the San Francisco Bay Area in 1988 and eventually signed with Los Angeles-based Death Row Records, under which he became a lightning rod in the East Coast-West Coast hip-hop feud of the 1990s.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2014 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
The biopic of slain rapper Tupac Shakur finally has a director. John Singleton has signed on to rewrite, direct and produce the long-gestating film, according to Variety . Singleton was previously linked to the project years ago, but the deal fell through, adding to one of several hurdles that stalled the project. Last year, as fans were mourning the anniversary of Shakur's death at age 25 due to complications after a 1996 drive-by shooting in Las Vegas, news broke that the often-delayed project had gained new steam.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 1993 | EARL OFARI HUTCHINSON, Hutchinson, author of "Black Fatherhood: A Guide to Male Parenting," owns Middle Passage Press, which publishes a bimonthly newsletter on African-American issues
In Kenneth Turan's review of John Singleton's "Poetic Justice" ("Traveling on a Bumpy Road," Calendar, July 23), he writes: "When the film's liberal use of profanity is added in (plus enough presumably authentic slang to confuse anyone not raised in the 'hood), a good part of 'Poetic Justice' is more unpleasant than most romances want to be." Unpleasant isn't the word. Is it possible these days for young black filmmakers to make a movie without those words ?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 1992
I am sick and tired of hearing people blame Simi Valley for the riots after the King trial. Listen up, fools. There were only two, count 'em, two people from Simi Valley on that jury. The rest were pulled from other towns in Ventura County. So John Singleton and Ice Cube, if you want to lay blame, point your fingers at Dist. Atty. Ira Reiner and the inept prosecution. They had the most winnable case in history, and they blew it. Please lay off my hometown. JACKIE JOHNSON Buena Park
SPORTS
February 5, 1995 | LONNIE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The outspoken John Singleton, who became the youngest person nominated for an Academy Award as best director for his debut film, "Boyz N the Hood," has turned his camera toward college athletics in his latest movie. In "Higher Learning," Malik (Omar Epps), an African American freshman track star at a fictional, predominantly white Southern California university, is torn between the advice he receives from a political science professor and a fellow student.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 1991 | Nina J. Easton
Inside Columbia Pictures, it's already been dubbed "Girlz N the Hood." But the real title of John Singleton's probable next film project is "Poetic Justice." The project breaks fresh ground by telling a coming-of-age story from a young black woman's point of view--and one source describes it as "very different" from Singleton's critically acclaimed "Boyz N the Hood."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2013 | Elaine Woo
In the 1970s, Syd Field's job in Hollywood was reading scripts all day and picking out the gems that might make it to the screen. In one two-year period he figured he read 2,000 screenplays - and turned down 1,960 of them. The rejects were an "amorphous goo" of confusing plot lines and poorly developed characters that often caused him to close his office door at 2 or 3 in the afternoon and go to sleep. But eventually he figured out what distinguished the winners from the losers. The answer was crystallized in "Screenplay, The Foundations of Screenwriting," Field's 1979 bestseller that today remains the bible of scriptwriters.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2012 | By Richard Verrier
Writer-director Ava DuVernay stands outside a well-maintained Spanish mission-style duplex in South-Central Los Angeles, home to the heroine of her story, a hardworking nurse who works the night shift and struggles to maintain a relationship with a husband serving a prison sentence. “When people think South-Central or Compton, it's all 'Boyz n the Hood,"' said DuVernay, referring to the 1991 saga directed by John Singleton. “It's never a house like this. It becomes an assumption that people who live in these communities don't care about their home, don't work as hard for them and don't own their homes.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2012 | By Randy O. Williams, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Training camps regularly prepare football players for their roles on the field, so why not one to help them prepare for their post-gridiron roles — in this case, a career in Hollywood? That's the idea behind the inaugural NFL Hollywood Boot Camp that kicks off (so to speak) Monday on the back lots of Universal Studios. Born out of a meeting between Film Life Chief Executive Jeff Friday and Baltimore Ravens linebacker Terrell Suggs, the new program is funded by the Player Engagement division of the NFL, an educational arm that also offers programs in broadcasting, business and music for current and former NFL players.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2011 | By Glenn Whipp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Not long into the so-so action thriller "Abduction," Lily Collins is living every teen girl's dream, hanging out in Taylor Lautner's bedroom. No … it's not like that . They're two high-school seniors, sitting on opposite ends of the bed while researching a class project on missing children. They're scrolling through pictures of kids on their laptops, guessing what the children might look like today. For the Record, 7:26 a.m. Sept. 23: The headline on an earlier version of this online article incorrectly referred to Taylor Lautner as Tyler.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2011
In the 20 years since the release of "Boyz N the Hood," the film's principals have all gone on to solid acting careers, including an Academy Award: John Singleton: The director is preparing to release his eighth film since "Boyz. " Following a "Shaft" sequel starring Samuel L. Jackson, and "2 Fast 2 Furious," the second installment of the car racing franchise, Singleton's "Abduction," a thriller starring "Twilight's" Taylor Lautner, will open nationwide on Sept. 23. Laurence Fishburne: With a steady stream of film and television projects to his credit — perhaps most notably his roles as Ike Turner in "What's Love Got to Do With It" (which reunited him with "Boyz" costar Angela Bassett)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2011 | Tim Swanson
Twenty years ago this month, a small, hip-hop infused coming-of-age drama set in South-Central Los Angeles called "Boyz N the Hood" was causing extreme reactions from two very different audiences. Written and directed by John Singleton, a brash 23-year-old just months out of USC's film school, and made for a mere $5.7 million, largely with an unknown and untested cast of African American actors, the film had just played May's prestigious Cannes Film Festival where it received a 20-minute standing ovation.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2010 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Out of all the athletes caught doping in recent years, the one who suffered some of the harshest consequences was track and field star Marion Jones. After lying repeatedly to officials, to the public and, most important, to a federal grand jury about her use of steroids before and during the 2000 Summer Olympics, Jones finally confessed. She lost her five Olympic medals and her records, left track and field and was sentenced to six months in prison for perjury. Although the first part of this narrative resembles that of other (usually male)
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