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July 28, 2011 | By John Horn, Los Angeles Times
It's hard enough to get into the Sundance Film Festival — more than 10,000 features, documentaries and shorts were submitted for just a few dozen slots in this year's festival. But it's almost equally hard to leave the nation's top gathering for independent film with a distribution deal. Only a handful of Sundance titles receive a meaningful theatrical release. Determined to break that distribution bottleneck, the Sundance Institute on Wednesday launched an initiative that for the first time packages festival films under the Sundance name and offers them for simultaneous viewing on six of the Internet's biggest video platforms — Apple Inc.'s iTunes, Amazon.com, Hulu, Netflix Inc., Google Inc.'s YouTube and Rainbow Media's SundanceNow.
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BUSINESS
July 28, 2011 | By John Horn, Los Angeles Times
It's hard enough to get into the Sundance Film Festival — more than 10,000 features, documentaries and shorts were submitted for just a few dozen slots in this year's festival. But it's almost equally hard to leave the nation's top gathering for independent film with a distribution deal. Only a handful of Sundance titles receive a meaningful theatrical release. Determined to break that distribution bottleneck, the Sundance Institute on Wednesday launched an initiative that for the first time packages festival films under the Sundance name and offers them for simultaneous viewing on six of the Internet's biggest video platforms — Apple Inc.'s iTunes, Amazon.com, Hulu, Netflix Inc., Google Inc.'s YouTube and Rainbow Media's SundanceNow.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 1999 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He has a boyish face and a skinny, 6-foot-4-inch frame, and when he walks down Main Street here at the Sundance Film Festival, a knapsack on his shoulder and an orange T-shirt peeking out from under a woolly gray sweater, he looks less like a deal-maker than a sophomore in the middle of final exams. But the single, sibilant syllable of this lawyer's last name has power in the independent film community. It can open doors.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 1999 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He has a boyish face and a skinny, 6-foot-4-inch frame, and when he walks down Main Street here at the Sundance Film Festival, a knapsack on his shoulder and an orange T-shirt peeking out from under a woolly gray sweater, he looks less like a deal-maker than a sophomore in the middle of final exams. But the single, sibilant syllable of this lawyer's last name has power in the independent film community. It can open doors.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2007 | John Horn
Outbidding several companies that specialize in independent films, Sony's Columbia Pictures has plunked down a hefty $11.5 million for North American rights to James Gray's "We Own the Night," a gritty crime drama that made its debut at the festival. In topping bids from Fox Searchlight, Miramax, Lionsgate and Summit Entertainment, Columbia also committed to an expansive theatrical release this fall and a rich video deal for Gray's movie, the first since his 2000 work, "The Yards."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2011
"Senna," a documentary about Brazilian race-car driver Ayrton Senna, has gotten off to a speedy start at the box office. The film, which opened in one theater in Los Angeles and another in New York this past weekend, collected $66,075 for a solid per-theater average of $33,038, according to an estimate from distributor Producers Distribution Agency. "Senna" is the second release for the company founded by John Sloss' Cinetic Media last year when it distributed the Oscar-nominated documentary "Exit Through the Gift Shop" from the street artist Banksy.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2007 | John Horn, Times Staff Writer
It took four days, but the first Sundance Film Festival feature finally has been sold -- with Harvey Weinstein's purchase of the Iraq war bereavement drama "Grace Is Gone" for $4 million. Thanks to a consistently grim slate of films, acquisitions this year have been slow, especially compared to last year, when "Little Miss Sunshine" sold soon after its screening on the first full day for a record $10.5 million.
BUSINESS
March 23, 2000 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pop.com, an Internet entertainment site backed by Imagine Entertainment and DreamWorks SKG, on Wednesday unveiled a division to solicit and acquire the rights to short films and animation for online distribution. The move marks the company's first invitation to filmmakers and animators to submit works that--if selected--would be shown on the Pop.com site alongside programming the company is producing itself, including expected contributions from co-founders Steven Spielberg and Ron Howard.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1993 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"The Ballad of Little Jo" (selected theaters) is a severely de-romanticized view of the Old West and the women who labored--in more ways than one--on its frontiers. At two hours, "Little Jo" is a long slog of revisionism, and by the end it doesn't necessarily seem any closer to the truth than the standard Hollywood Westerns. It's just bleaker. Revisionist Westerns, like, most recently, Eastwood's "Unforgiven," usually explore the consequences of violence in a male-dominated society.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Few studios have ever released a film like Richard Linklater's "Waking Life," but then there's never been another film quite like this adventurous yet problematic undertaking. The Austin, Texas, filmmaker who came to renown with "Slacker," "Dazed and Confused" and "Before Sunrise" has experimented with a new animation technique, which involved shooting and editing the film as a live-action work and then having a team of more than 30 graphic artists "paint" each frame via computer.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1999 | GENE SEYMOUR, FOR THE TIMES
To those with a fervent belief in the positive energy of cultural crossover, "Whiteboys" offers a stern test--if not a hesitant leap--of faith. The movie documents accurately the capacity of pop culture to make mongrels of its consumers. But it doesn't quite know (or want to know) what to make of it.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With "Tape," Richard Linklater moves from his venturesome but problematic recent work to a traditional but more rewarding chamber drama, a deft and engaging adaptation of Stephen Belber's three-character play set in a Lansing, Mich., motel room. Shrewdly, Linklater doesn't try to play against the inherent theatricality of the material, but trusts in its power and in the talent and skill of Ethan Hawke, Robert Sean Leonard and Uma Thurman to draw us into the drama.
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