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John Sohl

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NEWS
December 10, 1989 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The commander of the San Diego-based submarine that snared a tugboat in June has been relieved of command because of the fatal accident and two other incidents, Navy officials said Saturday. Citing lack of confidence, Navy officials relieved Cmdr. John H. Sohl III of his command of the nuclear-powered Houston. The submarine was on standby during the filming of the movie "Hunt for Red October" when it snagged a 1,000-foot steel cable and sank the tugboat Barcona 10 miles southwest of Long Beach.
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NEWS
December 10, 1989 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The commander of the San Diego-based submarine that snared a tugboat in June has been relieved of command because of the fatal accident and two other incidents, Navy officials said Saturday. Citing lack of confidence, Navy officials relieved Cmdr. John H. Sohl III of his command of the nuclear-powered Houston. The submarine was on standby during the filming of the movie "Hunt for Red October" when it snagged a 1,000-foot steel cable and sank the tugboat Barcona 10 miles southwest of Long Beach.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1989 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The commander of the San Diego-based submarine that snared a tugboat in June has been relieved of his command because of the fatal accident and two other incidents, Navy officials said Saturday. Citing lack of confidence, Navy officials have relieved Cmdr. John H.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1989 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The commander of the San Diego-based submarine that snared a tugboat in June has been relieved of his command because of the fatal accident and two other incidents, Navy officials said Saturday. Citing lack of confidence, Navy officials have relieved Cmdr. John H.
NEWS
June 22, 1989 | BETTINA BOXALL and JACK JONES, Times Staff Writers
Electronic detection equipment apparently failed to tell the crew of the nuclear-powered Navy submarine Houston that it was near the tugboat it accidentally dragged under last week with the loss of one tug sailor, a federal investigator said Wednesday. National Transportation Safety Board investigator Donald J. Tyrrell said he believes that the Houston's crew acted as quickly as it could to help after the 360-foot sub snagged a cable between the tugboat Barcona and two barges south of Long Beach early on June 14. The tug was hauled down in 2,500 feet of water.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1991 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fans of Sherlock Holmes had a real mystery on their hands Saturday when they set out in Los Angeles to re-create the "death" 100 years ago of the fictional English sleuth in a plunge over a waterfall. Despite their best detective work, members of the Sherlock Holmes society could not track down a waterfall in drought-plagued Los Angeles.
NEWS
June 16, 1989 | SCOTT HARRIS and JANE FRITSCH, Times Staff Writers
Officials investigating a Navy submarine's sinking of a tugboat off Los Angeles--killing one crewman--are questioning how a submarine equipped with highly sophisticated listening devices failed to avoid the accident. The Houston, a nuclear-powered submarine based in San Diego, sank the tug Barcona before dawn Wednesday when it snagged a 1,000-foot steel cable connecting the tugboat to two empty barges. The sub yanked the tugboat backward and into the water about 10 miles southwest of Long Beach.
NEWS
June 20, 1989 | SHERYL STOLBERG and JACK JONES, Times Staff Writers
The nuclear-powered Navy submarine Houston, which in a freak accident Wednesday sank a tugboat off Long Beach and killed one of the tug's crewmen, cut through a San Pedro fishing boat's net just two nights later, the Navy reported Monday. The Friday night incident occurred several miles south of Los Angeles Harbor as the attack submarine, running on the surface, headed for its home port of San Diego after participating in the filming of "The Hunt for Red October." The submarine had been on standby for filming Wednesday when it snagged the barge tow cable of the tugboat Barcona, pulling it under in 2,500 feet of water.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1991 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Navy has rejected a trio of safety recommendations by the National Transportation Safety Board in the wake of a 1989 accident off the coast of California in which a submarine sunk a tugboat after snagging its towing cable, according to a letter released Tuesday by the NTSB. In an April 29 letter to Chief of Naval Operations Frank B. Kelso II, safety board Chairman James L.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1990 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Dan Rodriguez, the sea was a fabulous escape. "The ocean is different," he says. "You go out there, you were always breathing that sea breeze. Things are clearer. You could see the stars at night, different cloud formations, the wildlife, herds of sea lions. It's a different world." It's a world, however, that is now shut off to Rodriguez.
BUSINESS
April 28, 1988 | KEITH BRADSHER, Times Staff Writer
For a generation of young Americans with low incomes and no cars of their own, there was a legitimate way in the 1950s and '60s to drive around the country in the comfort of a stranger's car. You paid one of the so-called drive-away companies a deposit--perhaps $50 or $100--and received an often-spiffy set of wheels, a full tank of gas and directions to a distant destination. If you slept in the car, the only costs involved in getting from here to there were those of gasoline and food.
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