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John Sonsini

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October 17, 1986
An art-world Rambo has been shaping up in various guises for the last four years in John Sonsini's paintings. He has been a cartoon character, a fallen hero and an anxious youth trying to get tough enough to meet all comers. In a show of recent paintings, Sonsini now gives us a full-blown muscle man with bulging thighs and pulsing pectorals. You don't always see him clearly; his contours tend to emerge slowly from the dark, crusty impasto of acrylics on canvas.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2005 | Allan M. Jalon, Special to The Times
When he paints, when he talks about painting, John Sonsini gives himself most completely to one subject: guys. He's explored it in his work for more than 30 years: gay guys, not-gay guys, working-class guys, Latino guys, the Mexican guy he lives with, the Latino immigrant guys he hires from L.A. street corners and whom he's painted to increasing acclaim these past four years -- about 250 of them so far.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2005 | Allan M. Jalon, Special to The Times
When he paints, when he talks about painting, John Sonsini gives himself most completely to one subject: guys. He's explored it in his work for more than 30 years: gay guys, not-gay guys, working-class guys, Latino guys, the Mexican guy he lives with, the Latino immigrant guys he hires from L.A. street corners and whom he's painted to increasing acclaim these past four years -- about 250 of them so far.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1986
An art-world Rambo has been shaping up in various guises for the last four years in John Sonsini's paintings. He has been a cartoon character, a fallen hero and an anxious youth trying to get tough enough to meet all comers. In a show of recent paintings, Sonsini now gives us a full-blown muscle man with bulging thighs and pulsing pectorals. You don't always see him clearly; his contours tend to emerge slowly from the dark, crusty impasto of acrylics on canvas.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2009 | Liesl Bradner
Audiences have always been fascinated with the art of portraiture, whether it's Leonardo's "Mona Lisa" or Andy Warhol's turquoise painting of Marilyn Monroe. It's a staple in most museums' exhibition schedules. The Hammer Museum has dug into its own collections for an interesting view of the art in "Other People," 75 works drawn from the historical collections of the UCLA Grunwald Center for the Graphic Arts and the Hammer Contemporary Collection.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1996
We the undersigned, as participants in and supporters of the Los Angeles arts community, wish to register our strong objection to the William Wilson review of the show "Lari Pittman Drawings," currently at the Armand Hammer Museum ("The Decadent Decor of Pittman's 'Drawings,' " Calendar, Feb. 7). Besides being naive about contemporary art ("works on paper in various media" have been considered drawings since the onset of the 20th century, e.g.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2000
Museums, galleries and murals mentioned in Christopher Knight's roundup (Page 10) of the top art attractions in Southern California. MURALS Willie Herron's "The Wall That Cracked Open" (4125 City Terrace Drive, near Carmelita Avenue, City Terrace). The 1972 mural is painted at the site where Herron's younger brother was stabbed by local gang members. Judy Baca's "The Great Wall of Los Angeles" (Coldwater Canyon Avenue between Burbank Boulevard and Oxnard Street, Van Nuys).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Joni Gordon, an art world novice who bought a failing Melrose Avenue gallery, Newspace, 37 years ago and turned it into an incubator for Los Angeles' contemporary art scene, has died. She was 75. Gordon died Sept. 11 in Bend, Ore., 10 days after a massive brain hemorrhage at her central Oregon vacation home, said her son, John. Under Gordon, Newspace, which she ran from 1975 to 2006, became known for nurturing emerging local talent, including early shows for photographer Judy Fiskin, conceptual artist Robert Cumming, and painters Martha Alf, Jeff Price , John Sonsini, Lisa Adams and Dan McCleary.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 1994 | CATHY CURTIS
"Nasty," a show at Stuart Katz's Loft (through May 11) is supposed to be about sex--or rather, "gender issues," the contemporary lingo that emphasizes the conflictive aspects of carnal impulse. But for some reason, guest curator Dorrit Fitzgerald Rawlins (curator of the Irvine Fine Arts Center) shies away from the darker implications of her subject.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 1995 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The razor sharpness that has given Larry Johnson's slick, Ektacolor prints their edge for almost 10 years goes dull in his new exhibition at Margo Leavin Gallery. Missing from these large, sumptuously colored pictures is the tension between urgency and restraint that fueled his earlier work.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2004 | Holly Myers, Special to The Times
L.A.'s Cultural Affairs Department has had a rocky spring. In March, word got out that the mayor's budget team had slated the department for possible extinction -- a sacrifice on the altar of the city's $300-million budget deficit. Public outcry ensued, and the mayor quickly recanted, pledging to preserve the department but calling for a change of direction, namely a greater emphasis on the promotion of cultural tourism.
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