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John Spider Salley

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June 14, 1988 | Mike Downey
I suppose the exact moment that John (Spider) Salley of the Detroit Pistons snatched the lead from Mychal Thompson of the Lakers in the National Basketball Assn.'s funniest man competition occurred between practice sessions Monday, when Salley sneaked up from behind and pulled down Magic Johnson's trunks. It had style. It had substance. It had verve, and it took nerve. As goofy gags go, it had just the right texture--part "Animal House," part Soupy Sales. It also could have consequences.
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SPORTS
June 16, 2000 | J.A. ADANDE
Sure, there are legacies to be secured as the Lakers stand one victory away from winning the NBA championship. With a championship, Shaquille O'Neal can take a rightful place at the table with the great centers in NBA lore. With a championship, Phil Jackson can become only the second coach to win a title with two different teams, joining Alex Hannum (Philadelphia and St. Louis). But only John Salley has the opportunity to make history.
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SPORTS
January 27, 1993 | From Associated Press
John Salley of the Miami Heat was fined $5,000 by the NBA for a flagrant foul against Anthony Bowie of the Orlando Magic.
SPORTS
January 27, 1993 | From Associated Press
John Salley of the Miami Heat was fined $5,000 by the NBA for a flagrant foul against Anthony Bowie of the Orlando Magic.
SPORTS
June 16, 2000 | J.A. ADANDE
Sure, there are legacies to be secured as the Lakers stand one victory away from winning the NBA championship. With a championship, Shaquille O'Neal can take a rightful place at the table with the great centers in NBA lore. With a championship, Phil Jackson can become only the second coach to win a title with two different teams, joining Alex Hannum (Philadelphia and St. Louis). But only John Salley has the opportunity to make history.
SPORTS
May 24, 1991
A waitress' $600,000 claim against John Salley, whom she accuses of fondling her, was reduced to $3,500 by a mediation panel. Karen Pewtress, filed a suit last year, accusing the Detroit Piston forward of touching her when he put a $5 tip in her blouse pocket.
SPORTS
June 17, 1988 | Mike Downey
Who wanted it more? That's what this thing was supposed to be about. Who wanted it more? That's what Pat Riley, Chuck Daly and basket cases everywhere wanted to know. Needed to know. Demanded to know. Who wanted it more? The princes or the paupers? The monarchs from Los Angeles, proud keepers of the castle? Or the revolutionaries from Detroit, eager to enter the magic kingdom at last? Well, we sure did find out who wanted Game 5 of the National Basketball Assn.
SPORTS
June 5, 1988 | Mike Downey
Bill Davidson and son found a neutral corner and just watched. There were tall men everywhere, surrounded by shorter people who suddenly had another reason to live. Every square foot of floor space was occupied in the Detroit Pistons' locker room--guests and press and wives and kiddies packing the place like the Marx Brothers' stateroom--but you could easily pick out the basketball players as they squeezed by, because their heads bobbed above the mob. It was party time, Piston style.
SPORTS
May 31, 1989 | Mike Downey
The Worm drives to work in a vintage Mustang. The car is equipped with wall-to-wall, state-of-the-art stereo components--and, for good measure, a portable television. If you like to shake, rattle and roll while you ride, if you like to feel your seat vibrate beneath you, then come on, says the Worm, you are invited to be his passenger. The Worm once worked at the Dallas-Ft. Worth airport, handling baggage. One day he was accused of stealing stolen wristwatches. Another employee swiped a pocketful of jewelry from the airport gift shop, and, for lack of a safer hiding place, stashed it in the Worm's private cubicle.
SPORTS
May 24, 1991
A waitress' $600,000 claim against John Salley, whom she accuses of fondling her, was reduced to $3,500 by a mediation panel. Karen Pewtress, filed a suit last year, accusing the Detroit Piston forward of touching her when he put a $5 tip in her blouse pocket.
SPORTS
June 14, 1988 | Mike Downey
I suppose the exact moment that John (Spider) Salley of the Detroit Pistons snatched the lead from Mychal Thompson of the Lakers in the National Basketball Assn.'s funniest man competition occurred between practice sessions Monday, when Salley sneaked up from behind and pulled down Magic Johnson's trunks. It had style. It had substance. It had verve, and it took nerve. As goofy gags go, it had just the right texture--part "Animal House," part Soupy Sales. It also could have consequences.
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