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John Squire

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1997 | Sara Scribner
** 1/2 The Seahorses, "Do It Yourself," Geffen. John Squire, former guitarist for '80s-rock pioneers the Stone Roses, tosses the Roses' alternative stylishness for a practically stodgy classic-rock sound on this debut from his new band. Moving, tossed-off-feeling moments such as the silly "Happiness Is Eggshaped" and the extraterrestrial blast "Round the Universe" almost compensate for irritatingly beefy guitar solos and psychedelic mushiness. But not quite.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2013 | By Thomas Suh Lauder
The formula for a successful British band is simple: Grow up together in an industrial town (in this case, Manchester), wow 'em in London, win over Europe and Asia and then shred the music charts in America for the really big money. After getting tantalizingly close, the Stone Roses never made it in America, burning brightly across the pond in the late 1980s and early 1990s before famously flaming out. As the new documentary "The Stone Roses: Made of Stone" makes clear, the Roses were the Manchester band conquering Britain, Europe and Japan, more so than contemporaries Happy Mondays and the Charlatans and years before Oasis came along.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2013 | By Thomas Suh Lauder
The formula for a successful British band is simple: Grow up together in an industrial town (in this case, Manchester), wow 'em in London, win over Europe and Asia and then shred the music charts in America for the really big money. After getting tantalizingly close, the Stone Roses never made it in America, burning brightly across the pond in the late 1980s and early 1990s before famously flaming out. As the new documentary "The Stone Roses: Made of Stone" makes clear, the Roses were the Manchester band conquering Britain, Europe and Japan, more so than contemporaries Happy Mondays and the Charlatans and years before Oasis came along.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1997 | Sara Scribner
** 1/2 The Seahorses, "Do It Yourself," Geffen. John Squire, former guitarist for '80s-rock pioneers the Stone Roses, tosses the Roses' alternative stylishness for a practically stodgy classic-rock sound on this debut from his new band. Moving, tossed-off-feeling moments such as the silly "Happiness Is Eggshaped" and the extraterrestrial blast "Round the Universe" almost compensate for irritatingly beefy guitar solos and psychedelic mushiness. But not quite.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1997 | Robert Hilburn, Robert Hilburn is The Times' pop music critic
John Squire and the rest of the Stone Roses called their second--and final--album "Second Coming" in acknowledgment of the enormous expectations in England surrounding the work, which was five years in the making. The title could apply equally to the anticipation for the first album by Squire's new rock quartet, the Seahorses. It was the Roses' 1989 debut album, "The Stone Roses," that signaled the rebirth of melodic pop-rock in Britain.
NEWS
March 13, 2003
That was an enlightening critique of the new "24 Hour Party People" DVD in Thursday's Calendar section, particularly with your references to John Squire and the Stone Roses ("Crashing the '24 Hour Party'," March 6). Although the Roses did not play a prominent part in the movie, no one can doubt their absolute importance to the Manchester music scene and their influence on British music in general. It's a shame that their influence and genius were not widely felt here in the States.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1996 | Dave Jennings, from London
The three remaining members of the Stone Roses have vowed to soldier on despite the recent departure of primary writer and musical architect John Squire. In a bitter statement, the Roses say they feel "cheated" and "disgusted" about Squire's leaving in the middle of the recording of a new album. But with plans to recruit a new guitarist, they are "feeling stronger and more optimistic than ever."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1987
A veteran Los Angeles fireman accused of intentionally appearing nude in front of a woman firefighter was excused early from a Fire Department Board of Rights hearing Wednesday to seek stress counseling recommended by a departmental psychologist. Capt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1988
A Los Angeles fire captain accused of failing to show concern about so-called "girlie" magazines and the viewing of sexually explicit material on television at a Westchester fire station was found not guilty Friday by a three-member board of rights. The board, made up of three battalion chiefs, restored Capt. Arthur L. Suess, a 15-year veteran, to full duty without loss of pay after a hearing that lasted nearly a week.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 1996 | Dave Jennings, from London
What was meant as a coming-out party for the Stone Roses' new guitarist, Aziz Ibrahim, turned into a contentious battle between the band and media representatives attending a press conference held by the group before its headlining performance on the final day of the Reading Festival. The surprise session--the band had done only one U.K.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1997 | Robert Hilburn, Robert Hilburn is The Times' pop music critic
John Squire and the rest of the Stone Roses called their second--and final--album "Second Coming" in acknowledgment of the enormous expectations in England surrounding the work, which was five years in the making. The title could apply equally to the anticipation for the first album by Squire's new rock quartet, the Seahorses. It was the Roses' 1989 debut album, "The Stone Roses," that signaled the rebirth of melodic pop-rock in Britain.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 1997 | NATALIE NICHOLS
Once or twice during the Seahorses' concert at the Palace on Wednesday, a song would seem reminiscent of Oasis' melodic, acoustic-electric mix. More accurately, though, a tune such as "Blinded by the Sun" faintly echoed Seahorses guitarist John Squire's former band the Stone Roses, the erstwhile kings of Brit-pop who never quite managed to set the world on fire.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1988
A veteran woman paramedic testified Tuesday that when she worked at a Los Angeles Fire Department station in Westchester sexually explicit magazines were scattered around the firehouse and some male firefighters watched sex films on television. Lynn McKay Roth told members of a board of rights for Fire Capt. Arthur L. Suess that the magazines featured nudity and male and female sex acts and that the films ranged the sexual spectrum. The material offended her, she said.
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