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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1998 | From Associated Press
John Stanford, a former Army major general with no background in education who brought a no-nonsense approach to the job of Seattle's school superintendent, died of leukemia Saturday. He was 60. Stanford, who had been battling the disease for seven months, died at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, said Sue Edmonds, a spokeswoman for the facility in Seattle. "We have lost an incredible leader and a dear, dear friend," acting Supt. Joseph Olchefske said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1998 | DAVID FOSTER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
John Stanford loved to shake up the status quo, and when he signed on three years ago as superintendent of Seattle schools, he found he could do it with just a hallway greeting. "Hi, John, how are you?" people would say. "Perfect and improving," came his standard reply. He'd say it with a smile, and everyone would laugh--only to discover later, when they got to know him, that he wasn't joking at all. "He meant it," says Barbara Schaad-Lamphere, Seattle school board president.
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NEWS
October 6, 1996 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The general arrives to review his troops, and they are giggling behind their fists. The corridors of power are lined with wall lockers, and John Stanford strides by like a stiff breeze, grabbing outstretched adolescent hands and stooping to pick up potato chip bags along the way. There's one question he has for many of these young soldiers: "Do you have a hall pass?" This is the retired major general, a friend of Colin L.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1998 | From Associated Press
John Stanford, a former Army major general with no background in education who brought a no-nonsense approach to the job of Seattle's school superintendent, died of leukemia Saturday. He was 60. Stanford, who had been battling the disease for seven months, died at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, said Sue Edmonds, a spokeswoman for the facility in Seattle. "We have lost an incredible leader and a dear, dear friend," acting Supt. Joseph Olchefske said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1996
Re "General's Mission" (Oct. 6), about John Stanford, the superintendent of the Seattle school district: This man and his brilliant common-sense ideas are like a cool breeze in the desert. Exit exams, empowering school principals, uniforms, teachers judged on merit rather than tenure, harnessing peer pressure. As parents, we need to demand dramatic changes like this now, or we will never raise the standards or solve the problems with our public schools. CHERYL KOHR Redondo Beach
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1998 | DAVID FOSTER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
John Stanford loved to shake up the status quo, and when he signed on three years ago as superintendent of Seattle schools, he found he could do it with just a hallway greeting. "Hi, John, how are you?" people would say. "Perfect and improving," came his standard reply. He'd say it with a smile, and everyone would laugh--only to discover later, when they got to know him, that he wasn't joking at all. "He meant it," says Barbara Schaad-Lamphere, Seattle school board president.
NEWS
September 10, 1998 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The general appeared before his troops--skinny, hairless, straining to talk above a murmur--but it didn't matter. The troops exploded in cheers anyway, and the brass band played, and the choir sang, and more than a few wiped back tears. John Stanford, the former Army general whose three-year tenure as Seattle schools superintendent has helped renew this city's faith in urban schools, slipped out of the hospital last week where he has been fighting the battle of his life, with leukemia.
NEWS
February 23, 1992 | ALEX DOMINGUEZ, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Johns Hopkins institutions, which invented the way medicine is taught, are looking for ways to make big bucks from biotechnology. For example, when a researcher finds an enzyme in an organism in a hot spring and realizes it can withstand the heat in his washing machine and still get the dirt out, Johns Hopkins is no longer content simply to log the discovery in a journal. Its scientists are looking for ways to put that knowledge to work, to create products and, therefore, jobs.
NATIONAL
July 27, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
An 11-year-old boy was in guarded condition at a Houston hospital after a shark attacked him at Bryan Beach on the Gulf of Mexico. He had wounds to his right arm and leg. "It hit him and took a bite, swung around and attacked him again," said Freeport Fire Chief John Stanford.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2001 | DOMENICO MACERI, Domenico Maceri teaches foreign languages at Allan Hancock College in Santa Maria. E-mail: dmaceri@aol.com
The old joke goes something like this: What do you call a person who speaks three languages? Trilingual. A person who speaks two languages? Bilingual. And a person who speaks only one language? American. Americans may not be aware of their insularity, but there are signs of change. The John Stanford International School in the Seattle school district teaches two languages. Kindergartners and first-graders spend half the day being taught in English and the other half in Spanish.
NEWS
September 10, 1998 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The general appeared before his troops--skinny, hairless, straining to talk above a murmur--but it didn't matter. The troops exploded in cheers anyway, and the brass band played, and the choir sang, and more than a few wiped back tears. John Stanford, the former Army general whose three-year tenure as Seattle schools superintendent has helped renew this city's faith in urban schools, slipped out of the hospital last week where he has been fighting the battle of his life, with leukemia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1996
Re "General's Mission" (Oct. 6), about John Stanford, the superintendent of the Seattle school district: This man and his brilliant common-sense ideas are like a cool breeze in the desert. Exit exams, empowering school principals, uniforms, teachers judged on merit rather than tenure, harnessing peer pressure. As parents, we need to demand dramatic changes like this now, or we will never raise the standards or solve the problems with our public schools. CHERYL KOHR Redondo Beach
NEWS
October 6, 1996 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The general arrives to review his troops, and they are giggling behind their fists. The corridors of power are lined with wall lockers, and John Stanford strides by like a stiff breeze, grabbing outstretched adolescent hands and stooping to pick up potato chip bags along the way. There's one question he has for many of these young soldiers: "Do you have a hall pass?" This is the retired major general, a friend of Colin L.
NEWS
February 23, 1992 | ALEX DOMINGUEZ, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Johns Hopkins institutions, which invented the way medicine is taught, are looking for ways to make big bucks from biotechnology. For example, when a researcher finds an enzyme in an organism in a hot spring and realizes it can withstand the heat in his washing machine and still get the dirt out, Johns Hopkins is no longer content simply to log the discovery in a journal. Its scientists are looking for ways to put that knowledge to work, to create products and, therefore, jobs.
SPORTS
May 27, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Rusty Charpia singled home Dave Tripp with two out in the 19th inning to give Clemson to a 3-2 victory over Fordham in the longest National Collegiate Athletic Assn. playoff game ever played Thursday in the Northeast Regional at New Britain, Conn. The game broke the NCAA tournament record of 16 innings set in 1972 when Connecticut beat Harvard, 8-5, and equaled in 1979 when Miami (Fla.) beat The Citadel, 3-1. Because of the game's length, the game between St.
NEWS
October 11, 2009 | Eric Tucker, Tucker writes for the Associated Press
Scuba shop owner David Swain and his wife of six years, Shelley Tyre, traveled to Tortola in 1999 for what was to be a romantic Caribbean getaway. Swain came back alone. Tyre drowned while scuba diving in what authorities in the British Virgin Islands called an accident. They allowed Swain to take her body home. Her parents sued three years later, accusing Swain of killing their daughter, saying he was romancing another woman and that the couple's prenuptial agreement denied him money if they divorced.
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