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John Swanbeck

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April 28, 2000 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Kevin Spacey, "The Big Kahuna" is far from an ideal commercial follow-up to "American Beauty" in reaffirming his new star status. It's a small picture, its stage roots all too evident, and the role Spacey plays is superficially so similar to the one that won him an Oscar it invites comparisons between the two films unfavorable to "The Big Kahuna."
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2008 | Charles McNulty, Times Theater Critic
A man and woman meet in a city park. Beautiful but disheveled and clearly not in her right mind, she cries out for him to take possession of her. Partly out of concern for her safety, partly out of a sense of fateful intrigue, he brings her back to his hotel room, where he's staying on a business trip. And with an inescapable emotional illogic that seems at once ordinary and extreme, the two pass through lust, jealousy, loss and that curious romantic cocktail of confusion and hope.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2000
Aficionados of idiosyncrasy and innovative pop-music craftsmanship should stake out the Wiltern Theatre on Friday and Saturday, not only for headliner Fiona Apple and her postmodern cabaret rock but for an opening solo set from E, the leader of the acclaimed L.A. band the Eels. * Fiona Apple, with E, at the Wiltern Theatre, 3790 Wilshire Blvd. Friday and Saturday, 8 p.m. $30 and $35. (213) 380-5005.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2000 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With stars the stature of Kevin Spacey and Danny DeVito in major roles, "The Big Kahuna" doesn't fit most people's idea of guerrilla filmmaking. This isn't, after all, the latest credit card-financed debut put together on the fly by kids who work day jobs at Kinko's--not by a long shot. On the other hand, how many movies do you know with a producer-star who committed larceny to get the picture made? OK, maybe we should rephrase that.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2006 | Philip Brandes; F. Kathleen Foley;
Illuminating the societal morass of present-day Northern Ireland from the insightful perspective of a native son, Gary Mitchell's "The Force of Change" is a grim testament to intractable divisions and blind allegiances that defy rational solution. It's also a first-rate crime drama a la "Homicide" or "Prime Suspect," set in a Belfast police station where the distinction between good guys and villains becomes increasingly blurred in the course of two interrelated interrogations.
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