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John Szarkowski

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2007 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
John Szarkowski, the longtime director of photography at the Museum of Modern Art in New York and a dominant figure in the establishment of photography as an art form, has died. He was 81. Szarkowski, who began his career as a photographer and returned to his camera in recent years, died Saturday in Pittsfield, Mass., said Peter MacGill of the Pace/MacGill Gallery in New York. Szarkowski died of complications from a stroke he suffered in March.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times art critic
Artist Robert Heinecken (1931-2006) is best-known for cleverly manipulating found photographs plucked from mass media, which meant to undermine their authority in America's exploding image-culture. He's not included among the 36 artists in the historical group exhibition "Take It or Leave It" currently at the UCLA Hammer Museum, but he probably should be. A self-styled "para-photographer," Heinecken made pictures that crossed appropriation art with institutional critique, the Hammer show's theme.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2007 | Weston Naef, Special to The Times
When the news of John Szarkowski's death at 81 reached me on Sunday, my mind turned immediately to the first time we sat down together for a serious conversation, almost 40 years ago, and how his style of thinking and personal conduct still affect me. I was in my 20s, still in diapers as a museum curator.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2013 | By Karen Wada
Passionate and prolific, Garry Winogrand always had an eye out for the next picture, the next glimpse of life in the streets of his native New York and venues as varied as a Texas rodeo and Venice Beach. His subjects included protesters, partygoers and passersby. His seemingly haphazard images intrigued - and annoyed. He came to be seen as a singular observer of postwar America's hopes and anxieties, one the influential curator John Szarkowski called "the central photographer of his generation.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2001
Re "Ansel Adams, in Sharper Focus" (by Judith Coburn, Aug. 12): The article seems to be urging art lovers to view the centennial of Adams' craft because of his choice of landscapes, his decisions on composition, and the ability to capture a scene at the optimum time of day. If Coburn hadn't dropped the word "photography" in occasionally, you might think Adams worked in oils or watercolors. Photographers, working in black-and-white, know that anyone can travel to Yosemite and take the identical pictures he did. What makes him great, and is never mentioned in Coburn's and curator John Szarkowski's praise, is his mastery of the silver gelatin medium, his total control of the tonal scale and tonal separation.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times art critic
Artist Robert Heinecken (1931-2006) is best-known for cleverly manipulating found photographs plucked from mass media, which meant to undermine their authority in America's exploding image-culture. He's not included among the 36 artists in the historical group exhibition "Take It or Leave It" currently at the UCLA Hammer Museum, but he probably should be. A self-styled "para-photographer," Heinecken made pictures that crossed appropriation art with institutional critique, the Hammer show's theme.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2006 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
John Szarkowski put himself out to pasture in 1991, ending a 29-year career as director of photography at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. He returned to the art world 14 years later, but as an artist. A retrospective exhibition of his photographs opened at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art in 2005 and traveled to four other museums, including MoMA.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2013 | By Karen Wada
Passionate and prolific, Garry Winogrand always had an eye out for the next picture, the next glimpse of life in the streets of his native New York and venues as varied as a Texas rodeo and Venice Beach. His subjects included protesters, partygoers and passersby. His seemingly haphazard images intrigued - and annoyed. He came to be seen as a singular observer of postwar America's hopes and anxieties, one the influential curator John Szarkowski called "the central photographer of his generation.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2009 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, ART CRITIC
The landmark 2005 movie "Brokeback Mountain" is conventionally regarded as a romantic gay love story instead of what it really is -- a heartbreaking tragedy about the closet. Rarely does society want to admit its complicity in repression. But 40 years ago, the Stonewall Rebellion marked a sudden beginning of the protracted end of secrecy shrouding homosexuality in American life, which the closet still represents.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1987 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Times Art Writer
The charms of this town, compelling in any season, are irresistible in August. Or so it appears as traffic slows to a fitful crawl and one parking lot after another displays a full sign. Once those obstacles are surmounted, Santa Barbara opens its arms as seductively as ever. The aroma of hot cinnamon rolls wafts out of doorways while T-shirt shops flag tourists with the promise of comfort dressed up in a logo and a splash of color.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2009 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, ART CRITIC
The landmark 2005 movie "Brokeback Mountain" is conventionally regarded as a romantic gay love story instead of what it really is -- a heartbreaking tragedy about the closet. Rarely does society want to admit its complicity in repression. But 40 years ago, the Stonewall Rebellion marked a sudden beginning of the protracted end of secrecy shrouding homosexuality in American life, which the closet still represents.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2007 | Weston Naef, Special to The Times
When the news of John Szarkowski's death at 81 reached me on Sunday, my mind turned immediately to the first time we sat down together for a serious conversation, almost 40 years ago, and how his style of thinking and personal conduct still affect me. I was in my 20s, still in diapers as a museum curator.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2007 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
John Szarkowski, the longtime director of photography at the Museum of Modern Art in New York and a dominant figure in the establishment of photography as an art form, has died. He was 81. Szarkowski, who began his career as a photographer and returned to his camera in recent years, died Saturday in Pittsfield, Mass., said Peter MacGill of the Pace/MacGill Gallery in New York. Szarkowski died of complications from a stroke he suffered in March.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2006 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
John Szarkowski put himself out to pasture in 1991, ending a 29-year career as director of photography at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. He returned to the art world 14 years later, but as an artist. A retrospective exhibition of his photographs opened at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art in 2005 and traveled to four other museums, including MoMA.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2001
Re "Ansel Adams, in Sharper Focus" (by Judith Coburn, Aug. 12): The article seems to be urging art lovers to view the centennial of Adams' craft because of his choice of landscapes, his decisions on composition, and the ability to capture a scene at the optimum time of day. If Coburn hadn't dropped the word "photography" in occasionally, you might think Adams worked in oils or watercolors. Photographers, working in black-and-white, know that anyone can travel to Yosemite and take the identical pictures he did. What makes him great, and is never mentioned in Coburn's and curator John Szarkowski's praise, is his mastery of the silver gelatin medium, his total control of the tonal scale and tonal separation.
BOOKS
December 7, 1997 | LEONARD MICHAELS, Leonard Michaels is the author of several short story collections and a novel. His most recent book is "A Cat" (Riverhead Books)
The photographs in "A Maritime Album" are beautifully printed and compare well with fine reproductions of art. They were selected by John Szarkowski, a historian of photography formerly with the Museum of Modern Art in New York. The "stories," or commentaries, mentioned in the subtitle are by Richard Benson, dean of the Yale Art School. Benson's use of the word "stories" has a wide connotation.
BOOKS
December 7, 1997 | LEONARD MICHAELS, Leonard Michaels is the author of several short story collections and a novel. His most recent book is "A Cat" (Riverhead Books)
The photographs in "A Maritime Album" are beautifully printed and compare well with fine reproductions of art. They were selected by John Szarkowski, a historian of photography formerly with the Museum of Modern Art in New York. The "stories," or commentaries, mentioned in the subtitle are by Richard Benson, dean of the Yale Art School. Benson's use of the word "stories" has a wide connotation.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1987 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Times Art Writer
The charms of this town, compelling in any season, are irresistible in August. Or so it appears as traffic slows to a fitful crawl and one parking lot after another displays a full sign. Once those obstacles are surmounted, Santa Barbara opens its arms as seductively as ever. The aroma of hot cinnamon rolls wafts out of doorways while T-shirt shops flag tourists with the promise of comfort dressed up in a logo and a splash of color.
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