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John Tanton

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NATIONAL
July 25, 2013 | By Joseph Tanfani
WASHINGTON - In a gilded but often lonely life, Cordelia Scaife May, heiress to one of America's most storied fortunes, had a few cherished passions. Protecting birds was one. Keeping immigrants out was another. An ardent environmentalist more comfortable with books and birds than with high-society galas, May believed nature was under siege from runaway population growth. Before her death in 2005, she devoted much of her wealth to rolling back the tide - backing birth control and curbing immigration, both legal and illegal.
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NATIONAL
July 25, 2013 | By Joseph Tanfani
WASHINGTON - In a gilded but often lonely life, Cordelia Scaife May, heiress to one of America's most storied fortunes, had a few cherished passions. Protecting birds was one. Keeping immigrants out was another. An ardent environmentalist more comfortable with books and birds than with high-society galas, May believed nature was under siege from runaway population growth. Before her death in 2005, she devoted much of her wealth to rolling back the tide - backing birth control and curbing immigration, both legal and illegal.
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NEWS
October 28, 1988 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
Linda Chavez sighed deeply under the weight of her latest controversy and, perhaps, the greatest irony of her professional career. Here she was, the consummate planner who in an uncharacteristically hasty move had resigned as president of U.S. English, a group Latinos deplore, and the best thing her Latino critics had to say about her was that she may have made the right move for the wrong reasons and that she'd waited too long to make it anyway.
NEWS
October 28, 1988 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
Linda Chavez sighed deeply under the weight of her latest controversy and, perhaps, the greatest irony of her professional career. Here she was, the consummate planner who in an uncharacteristically hasty move had resigned as president of U.S. English, a group Latinos deplore, and the best thing her Latino critics had to say about her was that she may have made the right move for the wrong reasons and that she'd waited too long to make it anyway.
NEWS
October 14, 1988 | Associated Press
Walter Cronkite resigned from the advisory board of a group that promotes government use of English only, and the former White House aide who is the organization's president says she may follow suit. In a letter to U.S. English president Linda Chavez, the CBS newsman said he is afraid that an Arizona proposal the group supports could hurt minorities. The letter dated Oct. 6 was released by Cronkite's office in New York on Thursday. Chavez, a former aide to President Reagan and U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1997
As president of the Sierra Club, I feel compelled to respond to Alexander Cockburn's latest work of fiction disguised as journalism, "A Big Green Bomb Aimed at Immigration" (Column Left, Oct. 2). Sadly, it's hard to know where to begin. Through a combination of innuendo and flagrant misstatements of fact, Cockburn creates the impression that the Sierra Club has embraced an anti-immigration policy. This is not true and Cockburn knows it. The current policy--adopted unanimously by the board of directors--states that the club will take no position on immigration levels or policies governing immigration to the United States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1997 | ALEXANDER COCKBURN, Alexander Cockburn writes for the Nation and other publications
One of the dirty semisecrets of American environmentalism has been its century-long obsession with population control and racial eugenics. Today, the obsession is alive and malign as ever. In the next few months, the Sierra Club, which advertises itself as the nation's most progressive and high-minded environmental group, may very well commit itself to public advocacy of severe restrictions on immigration.
NEWS
November 6, 1986 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, Times Staff Writer
One of the principal backers of Proposition 63--the English-only initiative that won overwhelming approval in Tuesday's election--said Wednesday that he will ask the Legislature to require that driver's tests, welfare applications, state university student aid forms and a variety of other state services be made available only in English.
NEWS
October 16, 1986 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, Times Staff Writer
Author and editor Norman Cousins resigned Wednesday from the advisory board of U.S. English, the national organization that is sponsoring Proposition 63 on the Nov. 4 ballot. He said that "there is a very real danger" that passage of the measure would cause Latinos and other racial minorities to be "disadvantaged, denigrated and demeaned."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 2003 | Greg Krikorian and Joe Mathews, Times Staff Writers
Arnold Schwarzenegger is coming under growing criticism from civil rights groups and immigrants' advocates for his 16-year membership on the advisory board of U.S. English, a Washington-based organization that bills itself as the nation's largest group dedicated to preserving English as America's official language. For much of Schwarzenegger's tenure on the board, U.S. English Inc.
NEWS
September 29, 1997 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a departure from its usual fare of public lands, pollution and endangered species, the Sierra Club is about to enter a potentially divisive debate about immigration, the outcome of which could alter the way people think and talk about the issue. Members of America's largest and most prestigious environmental organization will vote in March whether to reverse the club's neutral policy and endorse a drastic reduction in immigration as a way to slow U.S. population growth.
NATIONAL
July 13, 2013 | By Brian Bennett and Joseph Tanfani
WASHINGTON - The day after the Senate passed its immigration overhaul in June, leading opponent Roy H. Beck convened his top strategists at a corner table of a pricey restaurant to discuss what went wrong and to plan ways to stop the bill from becoming law. They brainstormed over rockfish and steak for 2 1/2 hours on how to derail any talk in the House of legalizing millions of undocumented immigrants - which Beck and his supporters view as unacceptable...
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