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John Templeton Foundation

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1992 | MARY HELEN BERG
Chapman University has been named to the 1992 John Templeton Foundation Honor Roll for Free Enterprise Teaching, which recognizes the schools with curricula in two particular fields. Each year, the John Templeton Foundation polls the presidents and academic deans of more than 1,300 accredited institutions nationwide. The respondents are asked to name schools that exemplify teaching the values of Western civilization and a free-market economy.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2010 | By Mitchell Landsberg
As a young doctoral student in the 1960s, Francisco J. Ayala was surprised to learn that Darwin's theory of evolution appeared to be less widely accepted in the United States than in his native Spain, then a profoundly conservative and religious country. Ayala brought a unique sensibility to the topic, because he had been ordained as a Catholic priest before undertaking graduate studies in evolution and genetics. What he believed then, and has spent his career espousing, is that evolution is consistent with the Christian faith.
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BUSINESS
February 4, 2007
"Testing the role of trust and values in financial decisions" (Jan. 21) incorrectly describes the John Templeton Foundation as having been an early supporter of the political movement known as "intelligent design." We do not believe that the science underpinning the intelligent-design movement is sound, we do not support research or programs that deny large areas of well-documented scientific knowledge, and the foundation is a nonpolitical entity and does not engage in or support political movements.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2007
"Testing the role of trust and values in financial decisions" (Jan. 21) incorrectly describes the John Templeton Foundation as having been an early supporter of the political movement known as "intelligent design." We do not believe that the science underpinning the intelligent-design movement is sound, we do not support research or programs that deny large areas of well-documented scientific knowledge, and the foundation is a nonpolitical entity and does not engage in or support political movements.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2010 | By Mitchell Landsberg
As a young doctoral student in the 1960s, Francisco J. Ayala was surprised to learn that Darwin's theory of evolution appeared to be less widely accepted in the United States than in his native Spain, then a profoundly conservative and religious country. Ayala brought a unique sensibility to the topic, because he had been ordained as a Catholic priest before undertaking graduate studies in evolution and genetics. What he believed then, and has spent his career espousing, is that evolution is consistent with the Christian faith.
NEWS
April 26, 1998 | Associated Press
Psychiatric students at Harvard Medical School will be required to take an expanded course in spirituality. The National Institute for Healthcare Research has awarded a grant of $15,000 from the John Templeton Foundation to the two doctors who now offer a spirituality course on a limited basis to fourth-year psychiatric students. Second- and third-year students will be required to take the expanded, 10-session course. Next year, it will teach the traditions of different religions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
A handful of medical schools will get a financial boost to offer students classes on the role of spirituality and religion in health care. The National Institute for Healthcare Research and the John Templeton Foundation announced $25,000 grants to eight medical schools. The money will fund courses on such things as religious beliefs and the role of faith among the terminally ill.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2012 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
Biola University, an evangelical Christian school in La Mirada, has received a $3-million grant to run a think tank on contemporary Christian perspectives on such topics as neuroscience, psychology and politics. The grant comes from the Pennsylvania-based John Templeton Foundation, which was founded by its namesake, the late Wall Street mutual funds pioneer, to help explore spirituality and links to other areas of scholarship. The award, the largest academic grant in Biola's history, will help its new Center for Christian Thought bring together eight scholars each semester — four from its faculty and four from elsewhere — over three years to research and debate "important questions facing our culture," said center Director Gregg Ten Elshof.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1997 | DAVID GREENBERG
Cal Lutheran University has been named to the John Templeton Foundation's 1997-98 Honor Roll for Character-Building Colleges, a designation that recognizes character building as an integral part of the college experience. "We're quite pleased with receiving this recognition," CLU spokeswoman Lynda Fulford said. "Our mission statement certainly matches with being a character-building university."
HEALTH
December 15, 1997 | MARTIN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a finding that could have implications for health care coverage, more than 90% of HMO executives believe that personal prayer, meditation or religious practices can aid in medical treatment or expedite the healing process. A survey of HMO executives, which will be released today at a meeting in Boston--co-sponsored by Harvard Medical School's Department of Continuing Education--also reported that nearly three-fourths of HMO professionals believe spirituality can reduce health care costs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1992 | MARY HELEN BERG
Chapman University has been named to the 1992 John Templeton Foundation Honor Roll for Free Enterprise Teaching, which recognizes the schools with curricula in two particular fields. Each year, the John Templeton Foundation polls the presidents and academic deans of more than 1,300 accredited institutions nationwide. The respondents are asked to name schools that exemplify teaching the values of Western civilization and a free-market economy.
MAGAZINE
August 5, 2001
Thank you for the thought-provoking article on spirituality and the mind ("The Biology of Belief," by Vince Rause, July 15). Usually journalists are cynical about spirituality, so I was surprised and pleased to see Rause conclude that faith remains a mystery worth pursuing and that the task is "to just shut up and listen for a while." I have found similar scientific results in my own research over the past 20 years. My research supports Rause's conclusions that the role of science is not to prove or disprove spiritual ideas, but rather to help us understand how to use this untapped part of our minds more effectively.
NEWS
July 27, 2008 | Marc Kaufman, Washington Post
In 1996, a meteorite from Mars found in Antarctica was reported to contain what could be fossilized remains of living organisms. That led then-Vice President Al Gore to convene a meeting of scientists, religious leaders and journalists to discuss the implications of a possible discovery of extraterrestrial life. Gore walked into the room armed with questions on notecards but, according to MIT physicist and associate provost Claude R. Canizares, he put them down and asked this first question: What would such a discovery mean to people of faith?
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