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John Tracy Clinic

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 2007 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
John Tracy, the deaf son of actor Spencer Tracy who inspired his parents to establish the pioneering John Tracy Clinic in Los Angeles to help young hearing-impaired children and their families, has died. He was 82. Tracy died Friday night at his son's ranch in Acton, where he had lived for the past five years, said his sister, Susie Tracy. The cause of death was not specified. He was 17 when his mother, Louise Treadwell Tracy, first spoke publicly about rearing a deaf child.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 2007 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
John Tracy, the deaf son of actor Spencer Tracy who inspired his parents to establish the pioneering John Tracy Clinic in Los Angeles to help young hearing-impaired children and their families, has died. He was 82. Tracy died Friday night at his son's ranch in Acton, where he had lived for the past five years, said his sister, Susie Tracy. The cause of death was not specified. He was 17 when his mother, Louise Treadwell Tracy, first spoke publicly about rearing a deaf child.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1988
The deaf can learn to speak. Marlee Matlin--a deaf girl--proved it on the Academy Awards show. Perhaps the program that reaches millions gave viewers a new perspective of the deaf. But, especially, it gave parents of deaf children a terrific boost in their morale. So to the John Tracy Clinic and other institutions that work with the deaf--many thanks. And to the teachers of the deaf for their patience and dedication that makes it possible for a little deaf child to learn to speak--our heartfelt thanks.
NEWS
May 16, 1991 | R. DANIEL FOSTER
It's a little-known fact--the largest private deaf education organizations in Los Angeles are really twins, oddly separated at birth. Although the John Tracy Clinic, founded in 1942, is certainly older than TRIPOD, both organizations were founded to educate the deaf, but they part ways on how best to do that. Both have courted and won the hearts of Hollywood in terms of monetary support.
NEWS
May 16, 1991 | R. DANIEL FOSTER
It's a little-known fact--the largest private deaf education organizations in Los Angeles are really twins, oddly separated at birth. Although the John Tracy Clinic, founded in 1942, is certainly older than TRIPOD, both organizations were founded to educate the deaf, but they part ways on how best to do that. Both have courted and won the hearts of Hollywood in terms of monetary support.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1989 | ELIZABETH J. MANN, Times Staff Writer
For six weeks every summer, families from around the world descend on a Los Angeles nursery school to make new friends, sing songs and share picnic lunches. But this is no ordinary summer camp. It is the John Tracy Clinic, a school for hearing-impaired preschoolers and their parents, and it offers its services free of charge.
NEWS
March 1, 1990 | JAN HOFMANN, Jan Hofmann is a regular contributor to Orange County Life
Tell a child--even a very young child--that he's going to have a test and you've got yourself a nervous child. Take him into an unfamiliar room and sit him in front of an equally unfamiliar, beeping electronic gadget and the problem just gets worse. That's why Andrea Joyce carries teddy bears along with her audiometer. Joyce, hearing-screening coordinator for the John Tracy Clinic in Los Angeles, brought both bears and devices last week to the Fluor Corp.'
NEWS
November 30, 1988
Audry R. Caldwell, 91, the last surviving member of the John Tracy Clinic's board of directors. In 1942, Mrs. Caldwell, Mr. and Mrs. Spencer Tracy, Walt Disney and sportsman and attorney Neil S. McCarthy started the Los Angeles-based clinic to serve families with young deaf children. Her husband, Orville, who died in 1967, was deputy mayor of Los Angeles. In Santa Barbara on Nov. 2.
NEWS
October 26, 1989 | ANN CONWAY
How does a football hero hang onto his drop-dead gorgeous frame? Feasting with his eyes, that's how. Striding up to the dessert bar at John Dominis restaurant on Newport Bay, Jack Youngblood eyed the macadamia-nut-coated nougats, the chocolate mousse piled in praline cups, the chocolate truffles laced with Chambord--and that's all he did. Figures.
NEWS
March 1, 1990 | JAN HOFMANN, Jan Hofmann is a regular contributor to Orange County Life
Tell a child--even a very young child--that he's going to have a test and you've got yourself a nervous child. Take him into an unfamiliar room and sit him in front of an equally unfamiliar, beeping electronic gadget and the problem just gets worse. That's why Andrea Joyce carries teddy bears along with her audiometer. Joyce, hearing-screening coordinator for the John Tracy Clinic in Los Angeles, brought both bears and devices last week to the Fluor Corp.'
NEWS
October 26, 1989 | ANN CONWAY
How does a football hero hang onto his drop-dead gorgeous frame? Feasting with his eyes, that's how. Striding up to the dessert bar at John Dominis restaurant on Newport Bay, Jack Youngblood eyed the macadamia-nut-coated nougats, the chocolate mousse piled in praline cups, the chocolate truffles laced with Chambord--and that's all he did. Figures.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1989 | ELIZABETH J. MANN, Times Staff Writer
For six weeks every summer, families from around the world descend on a Los Angeles nursery school to make new friends, sing songs and share picnic lunches. But this is no ordinary summer camp. It is the John Tracy Clinic, a school for hearing-impaired preschoolers and their parents, and it offers its services free of charge.
NEWS
November 30, 1988
Audry R. Caldwell, 91, the last surviving member of the John Tracy Clinic's board of directors. In 1942, Mrs. Caldwell, Mr. and Mrs. Spencer Tracy, Walt Disney and sportsman and attorney Neil S. McCarthy started the Los Angeles-based clinic to serve families with young deaf children. Her husband, Orville, who died in 1967, was deputy mayor of Los Angeles. In Santa Barbara on Nov. 2.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1988
The deaf can learn to speak. Marlee Matlin--a deaf girl--proved it on the Academy Awards show. Perhaps the program that reaches millions gave viewers a new perspective of the deaf. But, especially, it gave parents of deaf children a terrific boost in their morale. So to the John Tracy Clinic and other institutions that work with the deaf--many thanks. And to the teachers of the deaf for their patience and dedication that makes it possible for a little deaf child to learn to speak--our heartfelt thanks.
NEWS
October 14, 1985
James H. Garrity has been appointed director of the John Tracy Clinic. The appointment, made by the board of directors, was effective Sept. 1. Garrity succeeds Edgar L. Lowell who recently retired after 31 years of service to the deaf community. The Los Angeles-based clinic, founded in 1942 by Mrs. Spencer Tracy, is a private, nonprofit educational center that serves deaf preschool children and their parents. Information about clinic services is available by calling (213) 748-5481.
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