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NEWS
February 22, 1989
David Duke's opponent filed a court motion seeking to block the former Ku Klux Klan grand wizard from taking the Louisiana Legislature seat he won Saturday. The motion filed by home builder John Treen asks that Duke's candidacy be declared illegal because he lives outside the suburban New Orleans district that elected him. State law requires a one-year district residency by candidates. District Judge Clarence McManus said he was studying the request.
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NEWS
February 22, 1989
David Duke's opponent filed a court motion seeking to block the former Ku Klux Klan grand wizard from taking the Louisiana Legislature seat he won Saturday. The motion filed by home builder John Treen asks that Duke's candidacy be declared illegal because he lives outside the suburban New Orleans district that elected him. State law requires a one-year district residency by candidates. District Judge Clarence McManus said he was studying the request.
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NEWS
February 19, 1989 | RON HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
Former national Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke, running against a local businessman who received endorsements from President Bush and former President Ronald Reagan, captured a hotly contested seat in the Louisiana Legislature by 224 votes Saturday. Duke, 38, publisher of a newspaper for the National Assn. for the Advancement of White People and a proponent of relocating minorities to segregated sections of the country, ran as a newly registered Republican.
NEWS
February 19, 1989 | RON HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
Former national Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke, running against a local businessman who received endorsements from President Bush and former President Ronald Reagan, captured a hotly contested seat in the Louisiana Legislature by 224 votes Saturday. Duke, 38, publisher of a newspaper for the National Assn. for the Advancement of White People and a proponent of relocating minorities to segregated sections of the country, ran as a newly registered Republican.
NEWS
February 24, 1989 | From Reuters
The national Republican Party leadership, spurred by chairman Lee Atwater, today cut all ties to former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke, the newly elected Louisiana Republican state lawmaker. Party spokeswoman Leslie Goodman said 28 voting members of the party's executive committee unanimously repudiated during a telephone vote Duke's racist and anti-Semitic views and barred financial or other assistance for him.
NEWS
February 23, 1989
David Duke, a former grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan, overcame two last-minute challenges and was sworn into the Louisiana Legislature. Duke took the oath of office after surviving a lawsuit and an attempt by a lawmaker to deny him his House seat in a dispute over whether Duke was a legal resident of his suburban New Orleans district, which is 99.6% white. Duke, 38, smiled and waved before Speaker Jim Dimos administered the oath, which followed an attempt by Rep.
NEWS
February 22, 1989
Former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke overcame two last-minute efforts to block him from taking his newly won seat in the Legislature today and was sworn in as a member of the Louisiana House. Rep. Odon Bacquet objected to letting Republican Duke take his seat, claiming that he did not meet the residency requirement, but Bacquet's tactic failed when the House voted 69-33 to table his motion. Duke, who now heads the National Assn. for the Advancement of White People, then was sworn in.
NEWS
September 24, 1989 | From Associated Press
The state's Republican Committee on Saturday declined to censure state Rep. David Duke for his past as a leader of the Ku Klux Klan. The committee has no authority to kick Duke out of the party, but two committee members who worked on the censure said they had done so because of Duke's past of "promoting racial violence, his anti-Semitism and his neo-Nazi philosophies." Neil Curran and Elizabeth Rickey, both of New Orleans, tried to introduce the resolution at the party's quarterly meeting.
NEWS
February 17, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Republican Party rolled out its biggest guns Thursday--President Bush and former President Ronald Reagan--in an effort to keep a former Ku Klux Klan leader from being elected to the Legislature as a member of the GOP. Letters emphasizing Bush's endorsement of Republican businessman John Treen in his state House race against David Duke were circulated throughout the district, and radio commercials featuring Reagan's voice were broadcast throughout the day.
NEWS
February 16, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
President Bush and former President Ronald Reagan, afraid that a former Ku Klux Klan chief might be elected to a state legislature under the Republican banner, are going all-out to support his opponent, also a Republican. David Duke, who is running a white power campaign under the GOP standard, is the front-runner in Saturday's election for the Louisiana House of Representatives in a small white enclave near New Orleans.
NEWS
February 21, 1989 | From Associated Press
A freshman legislator said Monday he will challenge the seating of former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke when the Legislature convenes in a special session this week. In Metairie, the nearly all-white suburb of New Orleans where Duke was elected, David Sherman, a lawyer who convened a private meeting Monday night, said that a group of citizens would sue, questioning Duke's residency, if the legislator's challenge failed.
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