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John Tu

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BUSINESS
February 23, 1998 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yet another reason why employees at Kingston Technology Corp. like working for John Tu: He rocks. By day, the chief executive presides over the highly successful Fountain Valley company, which makes memory upgrades for PCs, workstations and printers. But by night, the quiet executive breaks out his drumsticks--or occasionally his guitar--and jams to the rock classics. A tiny silver drum kit is perched on one corner of his cubicle. Once a week, Tu takes drumming lessons.
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BUSINESS
June 12, 2000 | KAREN ALEXANDER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kingston Technology Co. will unveil a $105-million plant in Orange County today, the company's largest investment in manufacturing ever and one that will transform the way the company prepares and delivers memory chips. The investment marks a bold reemergence by Kingston's multimillionaire founders David Sun and John Tu, who last summer bought back the company they founded in 1988 and have made famous with their generous employee bonuses.
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NEWS
July 15, 1999 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER and JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The founders of Kingston Technology Corp., who became multimillionaires when they sold a large chunk of the Fountain Valley memory chip maker and shared the windfall with workers, said Wednesday that they are using cash proceeds from the 1996 sale to buy back their company--for a third of the original price. John Tu and David Sun said they will repurchase the 80% of Kingston from Japanese conglomerate Softbank Corp. for $450 million.
NEWS
July 15, 1999 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER and JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The founders of Kingston Technology Corp., who became multimillionaires when they sold a large chunk of the Fountain Valley memory chip maker and shared the windfall with workers, said Wednesday that they are using cash proceeds from the 1996 sale to buy back their company--for a third of the original price. John Tu and David Sun said they will repurchase the 80% of Kingston from Japanese conglomerate Softbank Corp. for $450 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1996
Re "Holiday Bonus for Workers: $100 Million," Dec. 15: I just want to say thank you to David Sun and John Tu, founders of Kingston Technology, for giving this corporate cynic a glimmer of hope. It's funny how two businessmen from Taiwan taught all of us a lesson in what is supposed to be the American way. Since the early 1980s, American business has come to view its employees as if they were a liability to the company's bottom line. Management has always been more than willing to take all the credit for a company's success, but none of the responsibility for its failures.
BUSINESS
December 17, 1996 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Resumes flowed from fax machines, TV news camera crews scurried about the building, and telephones rang incessantly Monday at Kingston Technology Corp. as news spread about the company's unprecedented $100-million bonus package for its employees. "We've been swamped all day since 7 in the morning," said Catalina Perry, one of three receptionists at Kingston. "We've received hundreds of calls. It's overwhelming."
BUSINESS
December 18, 1996 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Resumes flowed from fax machines and telephones rang incessantly Monday and Tuesday at Kingston Technology Corp. as news spread about the company's unprecedented $100-million bonus package for its employees. "We've been swamped all day since 7 in the morning," Catalina Perry, one of three receptionists at Kingston, said Monday. "We've received hundreds of calls. It's overwhelming."
BUSINESS
September 22, 1998 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Continuing to set the corporate standard for generosity to employees, Kingston Technology Corp. has handed out $20 million in bonuses at a time when the memory-chip industry is hitting an all-time low. The payouts--$10 million in both July and August to nearly 700 employees--is the second round of bonuses that Kingston founders David Sun and John Tu have bestowed on workers since selling 80% of the Fountain Valley memory-chip-products maker to Softbank Corp. of Japan for $1.5 billion in 1996.
BUSINESS
August 16, 1996 | MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an industry that worships technology and burns people out like fuses, David Sun and John Tu made a fortune by doing something truly unconventional: treating their Fountain Valley-based Kingston Technology Corp. employees like family. Perhaps it's the free Friday lunches and company-subsidized golf outings. Or the fact that Sun and Tu eschew fancy titles, and their "offices" are plain-vanilla cubicles alongside those of employees.
BUSINESS
September 22, 1998 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Continuing to set a stratospheric standard for generosity to employees, Kingston Technology Corp. has handed out $20 million in bonuses at a time when the memory-chip industry is hitting an all-time low. The payouts--$10 million each in July and August, to nearly 700 employees--is the second round of bonuses that Kingston founders David Sun and John Tu have bestowed since selling 80% of the Fountain Valley computer memory product maker to Softbank Corp. of Japan for $1.5 billion in 1996.
BUSINESS
July 15, 1999 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER and JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The founders of Kingston Technology Corp., who became multimillionaires when they sold a large chunk of their Fountain Valley memory chip maker, and then shared the windfall with workers, said Wednesday they are using cash proceeds from the 1996 sale to buy back their company--for a third of the original price. John Tu and David Sun said they will repurchase the 80% of Kingston from Japanese conglomerate Softbank Corp. for $450 million.
BUSINESS
September 22, 1998 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Continuing to set a stratospheric standard for generosity to employees, Kingston Technology Corp. has handed out $20 million in bonuses at a time when the memory-chip industry is hitting an all-time low. The payouts--$10 million each in July and August, to nearly 700 employees--is the second round of bonuses that Kingston founders David Sun and John Tu have bestowed since selling 80% of the Fountain Valley computer memory product maker to Softbank Corp. of Japan for $1.5 billion in 1996.
BUSINESS
September 22, 1998 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Continuing to set the corporate standard for generosity to employees, Kingston Technology Corp. has handed out $20 million in bonuses at a time when the memory-chip industry is hitting an all-time low. The payouts--$10 million in both July and August to nearly 700 employees--is the second round of bonuses that Kingston founders David Sun and John Tu have bestowed on workers since selling 80% of the Fountain Valley memory-chip-products maker to Softbank Corp. of Japan for $1.5 billion in 1996.
BUSINESS
February 23, 1998 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yet another reason why employees at Kingston Technology Corp. like working for John Tu: He rocks. By day, the chief executive presides over the highly successful Fountain Valley company, which makes memory upgrades for PCs, workstations and printers. But by night, the quiet executive breaks out his drumsticks--or occasionally his guitar--and jams to the rock classics. A tiny silver drum kit is perched on one corner of his cubicle. Once a week, Tu takes drumming lessons.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1996
Re "Holiday Bonus for Workers: $100 Million," Dec. 15: I just want to say thank you to David Sun and John Tu, founders of Kingston Technology, for giving this corporate cynic a glimmer of hope. It's funny how two businessmen from Taiwan taught all of us a lesson in what is supposed to be the American way. Since the early 1980s, American business has come to view its employees as if they were a liability to the company's bottom line. Management has always been more than willing to take all the credit for a company's success, but none of the responsibility for its failures.
BUSINESS
December 18, 1996 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Resumes flowed from fax machines and telephones rang incessantly Monday and Tuesday at Kingston Technology Corp. as news spread about the company's unprecedented $100-million bonus package for its employees. "We've been swamped all day since 7 in the morning," Catalina Perry, one of three receptionists at Kingston, said Monday. "We've received hundreds of calls. It's overwhelming."
BUSINESS
July 15, 1999 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER and JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The founders of Kingston Technology Corp., who became multimillionaires when they sold a large chunk of their Fountain Valley memory chip maker, and then shared the windfall with workers, said Wednesday they are using cash proceeds from the 1996 sale to buy back their company--for a third of the original price. John Tu and David Sun said they will repurchase the 80% of Kingston from Japanese conglomerate Softbank Corp. for $450 million.
BUSINESS
May 7, 1992 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In October, 1987, David Sun made a bet with his partner, John Tu, that their start-up company would survive for a year. If he won the wager, Sun would get a Jaguar. In October, 1990, Tu handed Sun the keys to a new car. Kingston Technology Corp. had made it without a penny of venture capital. Last year its sales of add-on components for personal computers exceeded $140 million. "It was a foolish bet," Tu, president, said recently. "I didn't think we were going to last six months.
BUSINESS
December 17, 1996 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Resumes flowed from fax machines, TV news camera crews scurried about the building, and telephones rang incessantly Monday at Kingston Technology Corp. as news spread about the company's unprecedented $100-million bonus package for its employees. "We've been swamped all day since 7 in the morning," said Catalina Perry, one of three receptionists at Kingston. "We've received hundreds of calls. It's overwhelming."
NEWS
December 15, 1996 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Setting a staggering new standard for generosity to employees, the co-founders of an Orange County technology company unveiled a $100-million bonus package at the company's holiday party Saturday night, and will soon begin giving workers checks for up to three times their annual salaries. With payments averaging $75,000, the largess represents employees' share of the $1.5-billion windfall received by David Sun and John Tu when they sold 80% of Kingston Technology Corp.
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