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John Tuite

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1991 | BILL BOYARSKY
Los Angeles redevelopment boss John Tuite's $1.54-million golden parachute is based on a concept that's proved disastrous for the sports world, the no-cut contract. For those of you who don't read the sports pages, it works like this: A weak-minded baseball team owner, hungry for victory, offers a pitcher a few million for five years or so. The athlete gets paid whether or not he plays well.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1993
The Los Angeles Community Redevelopment Agency ended a long-running dispute with its former director Thursday when it approved a legal settlement that reduces John J. Tuite's retirement package by $295,000. Tuite's controversial $1.7-million retirement agreement caused an uproar in 1991 among City Council members, who called the deal excessive and accused the CRA of trying to slip the matter through during the holidays.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1986 | SAM HALL KAPLAN, Times Design Critic
The new head of the Los Angeles Community Redevelopment Agency will be John Tuite, a former top official of the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development, The Times has learned. Although the agency declined to confirm or deny the appointment, others involved in the selection process said Tuite had been chosen for the job and was offered a two-year contract. Another source said he had accepted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1992
A controversial retirement package for former Community Redevelopment Agency chief John Tuite was reduced by $195,000 under a legal settlement approved Wednesday by the Los Angeles City Council. The settlement ends a long-running dispute between Tuite and the council over the $1.7-million retirement agreement that the former redevelopment chief received from the agency nearly two years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1991 | NATE HOLDEN, Los Angeles City Councilman Nate Holden represents the 10th District
The Community Redevelopment Agency's Board of Commissioners has once again ignored public opinion and continues to give away our hard-earned tax dollars in a reckless fashion. The commissioners gave John Tuite, its general manager, a record holiday gift--$1.54 million to walk away from his job. Why? Tuite has 19 months remaining on his city employment contract, and neither I nor the public understand why that much money should be paid to him or to anybody without his working for it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1991 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Still smarting over December's $1.7-million deal to gain the retirement of former Community Redevelopment Agency Administrator John Tuite, the Los Angeles City Council on Wednesday refused to approve a final $400,000 payment and voted to renegotiate terms of the controversial manager's ouster. Meeting first in a closed session and later in public, council members reopened the issue by using a quirk in the law that gives them oversight of some CRA budget matters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1990 | PENELOPE McMILLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Tuite, executive director of the Community Redevelopment Agency, did not misuse public funds in hiring two public relations consultants, but his agency failed to follow proper procedures in awarding the contracts, a city review has concluded. "In our opinion, allegations that the administrator contracted with public relations consultants for personal gain are unfounded," City Administrative Officer Keith Comrie wrote in a report Wednesday to Mayor Tom Bradley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 1991 | JANE FRITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Strong opposition has erupted to the $765,325 severance package approved for John Tuite, departing director of the Community Redevelopment Agency, and some City Hall officials were predicting this week that the huge payout will provoke the Los Angeles City Council to take over the agency. The deal, approved Friday by the CRA board, has prompted unusually harsh denunciations in city politics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1990 | FRANK CLIFFORD and JANE FRITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
At Mayor Tom Bradley's request, city officials are exploring allegations that John Tuite, executive director of the Community Redevelopment Agency, mishandled two public relations contracts, it was learned Wednesday. A question of bid-rigging has been raised in connection with one contract, officials said, adding that they also are attempting to determine whether Tuite paid a consultant public funds to promote his own image and that of his family.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1991 | JANE FRITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fight over the $1.7-million retirement package promised to John Tuite, the former head of the Community Redevelopment Agency, erupted in dueling press conferences Tuesday, with Tuite saying he deserves the money and Los Angeles City Councilman Zev Yaroslavsky vowing to fight the payout in the council today. Both said they were prepared to go to court over the matter. "A commitment is a commitment," Tuite said. "The money at issue is my pension.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1991 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Community Redevelopment Agency chief John Tuite, whose pension benefit payments were blocked by the Los Angeles City Council, filed a $1.5-million claim Thursday against the city and the CRA for breach of contract, "great emotional distress," attorney fees and interest on the unpaid $335,000 portion of his pension. Council members Wednesday had expressed anger that Tuite had negotiated a lucrative buyout deal before resigning under pressure last April.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1991 | JANET RAE-DUPREE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles City Council members, angered that former Community Redevelopment Agency chief John Tuite negotiated a lucrative buyout deal before stepping down last April, blocked payment Wednesday of his pension benefits. Tuite, in a tense confrontation with the council, defended his contract and threatened to sue the city for emotional distress, attorney's fees and interest for the unpaid pension, which was due on June 28. "You may not like the terms of my contract," said Tuite, 58.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1991 | JANE FRITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fight over the $1.7-million retirement package promised to John Tuite, the former head of the Community Redevelopment Agency, erupted in dueling press conferences Tuesday, with Tuite saying he deserves the money and Los Angeles City Councilman Zev Yaroslavsky vowing to fight the payout in the council today. Both said they were prepared to go to court over the matter. "A commitment is a commitment," Tuite said. "The money at issue is my pension.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1991 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Still smarting over December's $1.7-million deal to gain the retirement of former Community Redevelopment Agency Administrator John Tuite, the Los Angeles City Council on Wednesday refused to approve a final $400,000 payment and voted to renegotiate terms of the controversial manager's ouster. Meeting first in a closed session and later in public, council members reopened the issue by using a quirk in the law that gives them oversight of some CRA budget matters.
NEWS
March 18, 1991 | RICH CONNELL and JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley has repeatedly intervened with city and federal agencies to help a campaign fund-raiser whose housing developments figure prominently in an expanding political corruption probe, records and interviews show. Bradley's efforts on behalf of developer Harold R. Washington, The Times found, have spanned at least the last seven years and primarily involved city-subsidized, low-income housing projects proposed or built by Washington and his associates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1991 | JANE FRITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Tuite, the departing head of the Community Redevelopment Agency, said Wednesday that there was no conflict of interest in his sending letters to the City Council and the mayor's office on behalf of a CRA project for which he had once been a lobbyist. Tuite said he removed himself from any involvement in decisions on the project "in order to make sure there wasn't a hint of favoritism." "It was all out on the table," he added.
REAL ESTATE
July 16, 1989
Rather than gentrify South Park to the detriment of low-income residents of the blighted area southwest of the Civic Center, the Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) has taken pains to preserve and expand low- and moderate-income housing there. To date, the agency has helped rehabilitate more than 700 such units. Property owners who take advantage of CRA's help must guarantee low rents for their tenants, thereby stabilizing the community. New apartment buildings such as The Metropolitan today must earmark at least 15% to 20% of the units for low-income renters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1990
The Community Redevelopment Agency averted a showdown with the Los Angeles City Council on Wednesday by agreeing to present a compensation and benefit package for CRA chief John Tuite to a council panel for review. The council had been scheduled to consider ordering the CRA to abstain from acting on Tuite's pay until the city lawmakers could review the proposal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1991 | JANE FRITSCH and JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
During his tenure as head of the Community Redevelopment Agency, John Tuite sent letters to the Los Angeles City Council and the mayor's office urging approval of a CRA project for which he had once been a paid lobbyist, The Times has learned. The two letters, written in April, 1988, recommend council approval of a $600,000 CRA loan for the Sheridan Manor housing project, now the subject of a Los Angeles Police Department corruption investigation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1991 | JANE FRITSCH and JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
At least a dozen investigators searched the Baldwin Hills apartment of a real estate entrepreneur for six hours two weeks ago and questioned him repeatedly about possible financial dealings with Mayor Tom Bradley and other Los Angeles city officials, according to interviews and documents obtained Wednesday.
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