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John Tuite

NEWS
January 8, 1991 | RICH CONNELL and FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In buying out the contract of Los Angeles' redevelopment chief, city officials offered $375,000 more than required by contract, and the controversial settlement will amount to $1.54 million over 30 years, according to City Council calculations disclosed Monday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 1991 | FRANK CLIFFORD and RICH CONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
They paid Los Angeles redevelopment chief John Tuite a small fortune to get rid of him. In the two weeks after the disclosure of Tuite's $1.7-million retirement package, the richest ever received by a city official, the furor over the buyout has not died and important questions have remained unanswered.
NEWS
December 26, 1990 | DAVID FERRELL and JANE FRITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
To some he appears arrogant: slicked-back hair, a cool gaze, a smile that sometimes becomes a smirk. On top of that, Los Angeles Deputy Mayor Mark D. Fabiani combines youth--he is 33--with brass. The No. 2 man in Tom Bradley's Administration is a Harvard Law School graduate who has forged a reputation at City Hall as an achiever and hard-nosed political infighter. Admirers regard him as a "Boy Wonder"--the "smartest person in the building," according to one staff member.
NEWS
November 28, 1988 | JILL STEWART, Times Staff Writer
If the question were put to Los Angeles taxpayers, would they approve spending almost $2 billion in property taxes to finance downtown luxury condos, glittering night-time plazas and multimillion-dollar face lifts for private industries like the garment district? Or would taxpayers approve such a spending plan downtown if it were paired with $2.1 billion for low-cost rental housing citywide, plus several hundred million for child care? Many city leaders, led by Mayor Tom Bradley, say yes.
NEWS
March 18, 1991 | RICH CONNELL and JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley has repeatedly intervened with city and federal agencies to help a campaign fund-raiser whose housing developments figure prominently in an expanding political corruption probe, records and interviews show. Bradley's efforts on behalf of developer Harold R. Washington, The Times found, have spanned at least the last seven years and primarily involved city-subsidized, low-income housing projects proposed or built by Washington and his associates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1990
The Los Angeles Community Redevelopment Agency announced a proposed $267.5-million budget Thursday for the coming fiscal year, with more than a third of the spending earmarked for housing and human services. The proposed 1990-91 budget would be a 45% drop from the current $480.6-million spending program, a dip attributed to completion of major public works projects and financial obligations this year, CRA Administrator John Tuite said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1990
The Los Angeles Community Redevelopment Agency on Thursday approved spending $6.7 million to develop 272 units of affordable rental housing citywide, including a number of units for large families. The CRA will provide loans to five nonprofit developers to build six separate apartment complexes worth almost $34 million. Other funding will come from state, federal and private sources. The action is expected to receive City Council approval.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1991
In another step to increase its oversight of the Community Redevelopment Agency, the Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday ordered an audit of the agency that controls millions of dollars in rehabilitation projects. "It's been 10 years since the last audit of the agency was conducted," said Councilman Zev Yaroslavsky, acting chairman of the Community Redevelopment and Housing Committee, which directly oversees the CRA. "This is something that's long overdue," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1991
The Los Angeles Community Redevelopment Agency's Board of Commissioners on Thursday elected Edward J. Avila to be permanent administrator of the nation's largest urban renewal agency. Avila, 48, who had served as interim administrator for the past six months, was chosen after a three-month nationwide search by the city's personnel department, city officials said.
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