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BUSINESS
December 27, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Tyson Foods Inc. slashed the pay of Chairman John Tyson and Chief Executive Richard Bond by withholding bonuses after the meat company suffered its first full-year loss in 12 years. John Tyson, 53, who stepped down as CEO in May after serving in that position since 2001, was paid $2.1 million for the year ended Sept. 30. That was down 62% from the previous year when the company had net income of $372 million and Tyson received a $3.2-million bonus. Bond's pay was cut 68% to $1.
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BUSINESS
December 27, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Tyson Foods Inc. slashed the pay of Chairman John Tyson and Chief Executive Richard Bond by withholding bonuses after the meat company suffered its first full-year loss in 12 years. John Tyson, 53, who stepped down as CEO in May after serving in that position since 2001, was paid $2.1 million for the year ended Sept. 30. That was down 62% from the previous year when the company had net income of $372 million and Tyson received a $3.2-million bonus. Bond's pay was cut 68% to $1.
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BUSINESS
April 13, 2000 | Bloomberg News
Tyson Foods Inc. said Chief Executive Wayne Britt stepped down as head of the nation's top chicken producer and was replaced by Chairman John Tyson, grandson of the company's founder. The 50-year-old Britt held the top job at the Springdale, Ark.-based company for 1 1/2 years, during which Tyson's stock plunged 50%. Like other U.S. chicken producers, Tyson was hurt by a poultry glut and low prices.
BUSINESS
January 1, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Tyson Foods Inc. more than doubled the compensation for Chairman and Chief Executive John Tyson in fiscal 2003 to about $20.9 million as profit fell. The increase mainly resulted from $16.9 million in restricted stock, six times more than Tyson received a year earlier. Tyson's salary and bonus fell 22% to $3.49 million, the Springdale, Ark.-based company said in a Securities and Exchange Commission filing.
BUSINESS
January 1, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Tyson Foods Inc. more than doubled the compensation for Chairman and Chief Executive John Tyson in fiscal 2003 to about $20.9 million as profit fell. The increase mainly resulted from $16.9 million in restricted stock, six times more than Tyson received a year earlier. Tyson's salary and bonus fell 22% to $3.49 million, the Springdale, Ark.-based company said in a Securities and Exchange Commission filing.
BUSINESS
January 2, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Offering up a New Year's Day repast of chicken and steak, poultry king Tyson Foods Inc. has agreed to buy No. 1 U.S. beef processor IBP Inc. for $3.2 billion in cash and stock, the companies announced Monday. The deal, under which Tyson would also assume $1.5 billion in debt, was reached during the weekend and approved by a special committee of IBP directors who were examining bids for the company. Tyson, the biggest U.S.
NEWS
November 9, 1988
Vice President George Bush won Alabama's nine electoral votes, but Republicans had little hope of making substantial gains in state and local races. With 91% of the precincts counted, Bush had 751,892 or 60% of the votes, to Michael S. Dukakis' 507,501 votes, or 40%. A record 274 Republican nominees were running for office in Alabama, but state GOP political director Steve French predicted only modest coattails from the national ticket, even in a landslide.
BUSINESS
August 31, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Tyson Foods Inc., the world's largest meat processor, reduced its full-year profit forecast because of higher costs for feed grain and a drop in beef and chicken prices. Profit will be $1.08 to $1.15 a share in the year ending Oct. 2, down from last month's forecast of $1.20 to $1.30, the Springdale, Ark.-based company said. Chief Executive John Tyson cited "unfavorable results" in hedging the cost of corn, a feed ingredient, after the price of the grain plunged from a seven-year high.
NEWS
March 30, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The state has decided not to seek the return of a pig thief who fled prison in 1957--only to be turned in 44 years later by his girlfriend's son. Robert Clarence Cobb, 72, who spent three years behind bars before escaping, was released. Alabama Gov. Donald Siegelman refused to seek extradition. "We are more than satisfied with the number of years this man served for 13 pigs," Dist. Atty. John M. Tyson Jr. said in Mobile.
BUSINESS
January 31, 2006 | From Associated Press
Tyson Foods Inc., the world's largest meat processor, said Monday that its first-quarter profit fell 19% on weaker operating results in its pork and beef businesses, and projected fiscal 2006 earnings below Wall Street expectations. The Springdale, Ark.-based company's shares fell $1.10, or 7.2%, to $13.85, after being down almost 11% earlier in the day. Earnings declined to $39 million, or 11 cents a share, from $48 million, or 14 cents, a year earlier.
BUSINESS
January 2, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Offering up a New Year's Day repast of chicken and steak, poultry king Tyson Foods Inc. has agreed to buy No. 1 U.S. beef processor IBP Inc. for $3.2 billion in cash and stock, the companies announced Monday. The deal, under which Tyson would also assume $1.5 billion in debt, was reached during the weekend and approved by a special committee of IBP directors who were examining bids for the company. Tyson, the biggest U.S.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2000 | Bloomberg News
Tyson Foods Inc. said Chief Executive Wayne Britt stepped down as head of the nation's top chicken producer and was replaced by Chairman John Tyson, grandson of the company's founder. The 50-year-old Britt held the top job at the Springdale, Ark.-based company for 1 1/2 years, during which Tyson's stock plunged 50%. Like other U.S. chicken producers, Tyson was hurt by a poultry glut and low prices.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2004 | From Associated Press
Tyson Foods Inc., the world's largest meat producer, said Monday that regulators were conducting a formal investigation of benefits received by some board members and company executives. The Securities and Exchange Commission was "seeking information primarily with respect to the disclosure of perquisites provided to certain directors and officers of the company," including former Senior Chairman Don Tyson and current Chairman and Chief Executive John Tyson, Springdale, Ark.
NATIONAL
July 15, 2004 | From Associated Press
Several firefighters were injured Wednesday in a wildfire just west of the capital. The fire also damaged or destroyed a dozen structures and threatened at least 300 houses, officials said. Gusty winds pushed the out-of-control blaze to 600 acres in an area of upscale homes that dot the hills surrounding the city.
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