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John V Coffield

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June 15, 1991 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Juan Carlos Cruz Martinez wasn't at all pleased when the lanky, gray-haired priest appeared at his bedside at Mission Hospital Regional Medical Center in Mission Viejo. But the Roman Catholic priest kept returning, doing his best to lift the spirits of the 18-year-old Mexican who had lost both legs when he slipped under the wheels of a train he was trying to board as it passed through the Capistrano Beach neighborhood of Dana Point.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2005 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Retired Msgr. John V. Coffield, who devoted his more than six decades as a priest to social activism on behalf of the poor and disenfranchised, even at the cost of alienating church superiors in the 1960s, has died. He was 91. Coffield died of heart failure Wednesday at the rectory of St. Edward the Confessor Catholic Church in Dana Point, said Ronaldo Tomas, a longtime friend.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2005 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Retired Msgr. John V. Coffield, who devoted his more than six decades as a priest to social activism on behalf of the poor and disenfranchised, even at the cost of alienating church superiors in the 1960s, has died. He was 91. Coffield died of heart failure Wednesday at the rectory of St. Edward the Confessor Catholic Church in Dana Point, said Ronaldo Tomas, a longtime friend.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1991 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Juan Carlos Cruz Martinez wasn't at all pleased when the lanky, gray-haired priest appeared at his bedside at Mission Hospital Regional Medical Center in Mission Viejo. But the Roman Catholic priest kept returning, doing his best to lift the spirits of the 18-year-old Mexican who had lost both legs when he slipped under the wheels of a train he was trying to board as it passed through the Capistrano Beach neighborhood of Dana Point.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1995 | Cecilia Rasmussen
There are two kinds of history: One is written; the other is lived. And while scholars only recently have begun to set down the long and complex story of Southern California's Latino people, one fascinating chapter of that tale was lived out in a now-forgotten El Monte barrio called Hicks Camp. For almost a century, El Monte basked in the bucolic prosperity created by thriving walnut groves, strawberry fields and dairy farms. It was renowned as "The Garden of Los Angeles County."
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