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John Van Hengel

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2005 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
John van Hengel, who founded what is widely regarded as the nation's first food bank in an abandoned Phoenix bakery in 1967 and helped cities around the world set up similar systems to feed the poor, has died. He was 83. Van Hengel, who had Parkinson's disease and had suffered several strokes, died Wednesday in a Phoenix hospice care facility, according to an announcement from America's Second Harvest, a national hunger-relief organization that grew out of his efforts.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2005 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
John van Hengel, who founded what is widely regarded as the nation's first food bank in an abandoned Phoenix bakery in 1967 and helped cities around the world set up similar systems to feed the poor, has died. He was 83. Van Hengel, who had Parkinson's disease and had suffered several strokes, died Wednesday in a Phoenix hospice care facility, according to an announcement from America's Second Harvest, a national hunger-relief organization that grew out of his efforts.
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NEWS
February 9, 1992
The story on John Van Hengel ("A Second Harvest," Jan. 12) does a good job of capturing his essence, and that of food banking. One added point may be of interest to your readers. The story mentions the Grandview Food Bank of Pasadena, the nation's second food bank. The story also mentions Los Angeles Regional Foodbank. Grandview became Los Angeles Regional Foodbank, now the largest food bank in the nation. All of us associated with Los Angeles Regional Foodbank thank the Grandview Foundation for helping Tony Collier (who worked at Grandview and had a special view of help for the needy)
NEWS
December 31, 1992 | PAUL DEAN
John Van Hengel held a single, brilliant ideal: Why not collect grocery store castoffs and harvest food industry leftovers to feed the hungry? That was 25 years ago in Phoenix. Since then, Van Hengel's vision and his St. Mary's Food Bank have inspired 5,000 similar banks in 200 American cities and a dozen nations from Canada to Sri Lanka. But his billion-dollar assault on the hunger of millions has not changed modest, unceremonious Van Hengel. He still wears donated clothes and lives in a $375-a-month apartment on an annual income of $12,000, mostly Social Security.
NEWS
December 31, 1992 | PAUL DEAN
John Van Hengel held a single, brilliant ideal: Why not collect grocery store castoffs and harvest food industry leftovers to feed the hungry? That was 25 years ago in Phoenix. Since then, Van Hengel's vision and his St. Mary's Food Bank have inspired 5,000 similar banks in 200 American cities and a dozen nations from Canada to Sri Lanka. But his billion-dollar assault on the hunger of millions has not changed modest, unceremonious Van Hengel. He still wears donated clothes and lives in a $375-a-month apartment on an annual income of $12,000, mostly Social Security.
NEWS
January 12, 1992 | PAUL DEAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Where there is John Van Hengel there is less hunger. Certainly in pinched, crowded corners of Los Angeles, New York and Detroit where volunteers inspired by his simple dream are offloading hundreds of tractor-trailers heavy with government groceries. Eventually, every brown pouch and tan can of the military's $300-million food surplus from Desert Storm will be piped through several hundred food banks to make 70 million meals for the homeless of 50 states.
NEWS
February 9, 1992
The story on John Van Hengel ("A Second Harvest," Jan. 12) does a good job of capturing his essence, and that of food banking. One added point may be of interest to your readers. The story mentions the Grandview Food Bank of Pasadena, the nation's second food bank. The story also mentions Los Angeles Regional Foodbank. Grandview became Los Angeles Regional Foodbank, now the largest food bank in the nation. All of us associated with Los Angeles Regional Foodbank thank the Grandview Foundation for helping Tony Collier (who worked at Grandview and had a special view of help for the needy)
NEWS
January 12, 1992 | PAUL DEAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Where there is John Van Hengel there is less hunger. Certainly in pinched, crowded corners of Los Angeles, New York and Detroit where volunteers inspired by his simple dream are offloading hundreds of tractor-trailers heavy with government groceries. Eventually, every brown pouch and tan can of the military's $300-million food surplus from Desert Storm will be piped through several hundred food banks to make 70 million meals for the homeless of 50 states.
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