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John Vickery

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 1995 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Alceste, the misanthrope in Moliere's famous play, is actually too gregarious to be one. In the inventive new production of "The Misanthrope" at South Coast Repertory, John Vickery plunges into the role, making clear that, for Alceste, moral outrage is the most energizing tonic in the world. This Alceste absolutely requires an audience for his theatrical harangues against the insufficiently ethical behavior he sees everywhere. Performing his outrage is at least as important as feeling it.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2000 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Apparently the last thing John Vickery needs is another gadget. On a recent evening, the veteran stage actor was going through his eight-times-weekly ritual of having his face painted to play Scar, the villainous, cowardly usurper to the throne who drives the action in "The Lion King." This time, there was a new high-tech dimension to the procedure: A laptop computer had been set on his dressing room counter, with his Scar visage staring back at him from the screen.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1995 | Jan Breslauer, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
While John Vickery was playing Mowbray in "Richard II" at the Mark Taper Forum in 1992, the earth moved: 6.1 on the Richter scale, to be exact. Then, after the earthquake, the actors picked up where they had left off and finished out the press night performance. It was all in an evening's work for those who speak the speech in the land of palm trees and freeways. Vickery, for one, knows well that you have to take things as they come.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1995 | Jan Breslauer, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
While John Vickery was playing Mowbray in "Richard II" at the Mark Taper Forum in 1992, the earth moved: 6.1 on the Richter scale, to be exact. Then, after the earthquake, the actors picked up where they had left off and finished out the press night performance. It was all in an evening's work for those who speak the speech in the land of palm trees and freeways. Vickery, for one, knows well that you have to take things as they come.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2000 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Apparently the last thing John Vickery needs is another gadget. On a recent evening, the veteran stage actor was going through his eight-times-weekly ritual of having his face painted to play Scar, the villainous, cowardly usurper to the throne who drives the action in "The Lion King." This time, there was a new high-tech dimension to the procedure: A laptop computer had been set on his dressing room counter, with his Scar visage staring back at him from the screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 1985 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
Des McAnuff's staging of "The Sea Gull" at the La Jolla Playhouse proceeds from the assumption that it's necessary to divorce Chekhov from everything "Chekhovian" before we can see him clearly. You will recall that the play begins on the edge of a lake at dusk, with a little home-made stage in the foreground. Treplev, the boyish writer, is about to try (in vain) to impress his actress mother, Arkadina, with a new play, which will be lit by the rising moon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1987
A juror was excused from the Sagon Penn retrial Wednesday after she reported she had to care for her ailing husband. The 62-year-old woman was the first juror to be excused. Alternate juror John Vickery, a Mormon church leader, was selected to replace her. Jurors began hearing testimony Wednesday from an Encanto resident whose call to police about a man with a gun eventually led to the fatal March 31, 1985, encounter between officers and Sagon Penn.
NEWS
May 15, 2003 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
They could rename this year's Pacific Playwrights Festival at South Coast Repertory the Pulitzer Playwrights Festival. And the Pulitzer cachet appears to be enhanced by some notable Hollywood names participating in the readings at the Costa Mesa theater. This year's Pulitzer winner for drama, "Anna in the Tropics" by Nilo Cruz, will receive a staged reading, with Jimmy Smits and Tony Plana. South Coast will produce the West Coast premiere in October.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1995 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Vickery, one of America's best classical actors, recently appeared as "The Misanthrope" at South Coast Repertory. Jane Carr has a long list of classical credits from her eight years in the Royal Shakespeare Company and elsewhere. Now they're doing Bernard Slade's "Same Time, Next Year" in La Mirada. Let's not get snooty. Slade is no Moliere, but he knew how to put together a commercial Broadway comedy--for 1975 audiences. Yes, La Mirada is a long way from London.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 1995 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Alceste, the misanthrope in Moliere's famous play, is actually too gregarious to be one. In the inventive new production of "The Misanthrope" at South Coast Repertory, John Vickery plunges into the role, making clear that, for Alceste, moral outrage is the most energizing tonic in the world. This Alceste absolutely requires an audience for his theatrical harangues against the insufficiently ethical behavior he sees everywhere. Performing his outrage is at least as important as feeling it.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 1985 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
Des McAnuff's staging of "The Sea Gull" at the La Jolla Playhouse proceeds from the assumption that it's necessary to divorce Chekhov from everything "Chekhovian" before we can see him clearly. You will recall that the play begins on the edge of a lake at dusk, with a little home-made stage in the foreground. Treplev, the boyish writer, is about to try (in vain) to impress his actress mother, Arkadina, with a new play, which will be lit by the rising moon.
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