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John Voland

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1988 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
It's not like studio executives and independent producers have a lot of down time, but those who aspire to such lofty positions might learn a thing or two from "Goin' Hollywood." It's a new board game that pretty faithfully re-enacts the grief and paranoia involved in getting your pet project off the ground and into production. You can buy and sell talent, writers and packages, but--as in real life--the deal's the thing. The game, created by Greg Johnson and Michael Wiese, goes for $34.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1988 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
It's not like studio executives and independent producers have a lot of down time, but those who aspire to such lofty positions might learn a thing or two from "Goin' Hollywood." It's a new board game that pretty faithfully re-enacts the grief and paranoia involved in getting your pet project off the ground and into production. You can buy and sell talent, writers and packages, but--as in real life--the deal's the thing. The game, created by Greg Johnson and Michael Wiese, goes for $34.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 1987 | JOHN VOLAND, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
A black woman could soon appear as one of the high-kicking Rockettes at Radio City Music Hall in New York. In what would be a first in the troupe's 62-year history, a black woman--one of 23 women selected at an audition to be on-call for vacancies in the New York production of the world-famous chorus line--could likely be invited to join, the New York Times reported Saturday. The woman, who wasn't named, has already agreed to appear with the Rockettes Jan.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 1987 | JOHN VOLAND, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
A black woman could soon appear as one of the high-kicking Rockettes at Radio City Music Hall in New York. In what would be a first in the troupe's 62-year history, a black woman--one of 23 women selected at an audition to be on-call for vacancies in the New York production of the world-famous chorus line--could likely be invited to join, the New York Times reported Saturday. The woman, who wasn't named, has already agreed to appear with the Rockettes Jan.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1987 | JOHN VOLAND
Following are some of the prominent private institutions that maintain you can teach rock 'n' roll. All require some sort of audition before accepting students. --Musicians Institute, 6757 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood. The one-year program is divided into three disciplines: GIT (Guitar Institute of Technology), BIT (for bassists) and PIT (for percussionists).
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 1987 | JOHN VOLAND
* * 1/2 "BACK FOR THE ATTACK." Dokken. Elektra. This quasi-lyrical metal band's been pumping it out consistently for seven years now, and it's crunch time again for singer Don Dokken and his playmates, who give us about 63 minutes' (!) worth of buzz-saw rock within the supposedly antiquated vinyl grooves, and it all sounds just fine.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1987
Who cares what Valerie Harper is paid per episode ("Harper Plans to Sue Over 'Valerie' Ouster," by John Voland, Sept. 2)? It appears she asked to play hard ball and lost. I'm suspicious of any sob scene for sympathy where the lawyer holds the hanky, thank you. DON WREGE Santa Monica
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1987
A cringe of anxiety crept over my body as I read John Voland's indulgence , which masqueraded as a record review of Rush's new LP (Record Rack, Sept. 20). Incorporating such drivel as, "Oh, those lyrics!," "Oh, those orchestrations!" and "ought-to-be-illegal rhyme schemes," Voland's review of "Hold Your Fire"--the finest Rush album to date--was nothing more than an arena for a personal attack against the band. Shame on him. STEVE CANTOS West Hills
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1988 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Perhaps it was inevitable. Certainly it's understandable. Regardless, triple-gold medalist Florence Griffith Joyner will make what's being called her "television acting debut" in a guest-starring spot on NBC's series "227." Griffith Joyner, who won three gold medals in track events at the Seoul Olympics, will play herself as she pays a visit on series character Brenda, an aspiring track star, and tells her that there's more than one way to be a winner.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1988
Please, please, please set the record straight. In the article on the Independent Spirit Awards ("Independent Feature Project Bestows Its Spirit Awards," by John Voland, April 11), it was implied that in my acceptance speech I predicted (and perhaps desired) a "landslide victory for George Bush in the fall." What I actually said, after charting my consistently thwarted low expectations for "River's Edge" (I never thought the screenplay would be bought, and it was bought; I never thought it would be made, and then actually distributed, etc . . . )
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 1987 | JOHN VOLAND
* * 1/2 "BACK FOR THE ATTACK." Dokken. Elektra. This quasi-lyrical metal band's been pumping it out consistently for seven years now, and it's crunch time again for singer Don Dokken and his playmates, who give us about 63 minutes' (!) worth of buzz-saw rock within the supposedly antiquated vinyl grooves, and it all sounds just fine.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1987 | JOHN VOLAND
Following are some of the prominent private institutions that maintain you can teach rock 'n' roll. All require some sort of audition before accepting students. --Musicians Institute, 6757 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood. The one-year program is divided into three disciplines: GIT (Guitar Institute of Technology), BIT (for bassists) and PIT (for percussionists).
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