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John W Amerman

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BUSINESS
December 18, 1987 | DENISE GELLENE
Raymond W. Ferris, 56, has left his job as executive vice president for strategic planning at Mattel in what the toy company described as a "mutual decision." Ferris, a 15-year veteran of Mattel's executive ranks, also resigned from the company's board . A Mattel spokesman said Ferris "planned himself out of a job." The spokesman, Shel Holtz, said Ferris came up with a plan for Hawthorne-based Mattel that called for the elimination of his own job and that the plan was accepted.
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BUSINESS
September 13, 1991 | TOM PETRUNO
Mattel Inc. CEO John Amerman is on a roadshow for big investors this week, talking up the toy giant's prospects. He's promising double-digit earnings growth in the third and fourth quarters, and the message is falling on receptive ears in this still-lousy economy. Mattel stock rose $1 on Wednesday and $1.625 on Thursday, closing at $27.50--just shy of its 1991 peak of $27.625 reached earlier this year.
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BUSINESS
May 12, 1989 | DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writer
Barbie, Mattel Inc.'s 30-year-old teen-ager, is expected to lead the Hawthorne toy maker to improved profits this year, the company said Thursday. John W. Amerman, chairman and chief executive, said at the company's annual meeting in Manhattan Beach that he expects sales of the best-selling doll to increase by $45 million to about $500 million this year. Each year, Barbie accounts for one-third to one-half of Mattel's $1 billion of sales. Amerman said he expected significant sales gains from the company's line of Disney preschool toys, which brought in about $55 million in 1988, its introductory year.
BUSINESS
July 3, 1989 | DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writer
Toy soldiers are made to be shot at, and that's just what Mattel Inc. did to its Men of Medal army. As the Hawthorne-based toy company readied to ship thousands of soldiers to eager customers last winter, a last-minute market survey predicted that the toy wouldn't sell. Fearing disaster, Mattel sold only those on hand and stopped making the toy. "We caught it in time," says Mattel President Robert Sansone, who shot down the toy army. If Mattel's action seems unduly cautious, it has good reason.
BUSINESS
November 6, 1987 | JIM SCHACHTER, Times Staff Writer
Mattel said Thursday that continuing weakness in the worldwide toy market contributed to a $14.2-million net loss and an 8% drop in sales for the quarter ending Sept. 26. The Hawthorne-based toy maker reported the third-quarter loss was also due to a charge against earnings of $19.6 million, associated primarily with the refinancing of notes due in 1989. The nation's No. 2 toy manufacturer recorded net income of $16.3 million for the same period in 1986. The company had a net loss of $12.
BUSINESS
May 8, 1987 | DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writer
The new chairman of troubled Mattel Toys said Thursday a major effort is under way to streamline the company, slash costs and make it more responsive to the changing tastes of children. More layoffs are possible at the company's headquarters in Hawthorne, where 150 managers were laid off last March, said John W. Amerman, chairman and chief executive of the company that makes Barbie dolls and Masters of the Universe.
BUSINESS
June 5, 1987 | DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writer
Mattel, the troubled toy maker, has laid off more than 70 administrative employees over the last few weeks as part of an effort to streamline the company and reduce costs. Spencer Boise, a Mattel vice president, said Thursday that seven officers and 65 other administrative employees were laid off. Boise wouldn't identify the officers but said they were vice presidents or higher.
BUSINESS
July 3, 1989 | DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writer
Toy soldiers are made to be shot at, and that's just what Mattel Inc. did to its Men of Medal army. As the Hawthorne-based toy company readied to ship thousands of soldiers to eager customers last winter, a last-minute market survey predicted that the toy wouldn't sell. Fearing disaster, Mattel sold only those on hand and stopped making the toy. "We caught it in time," says Mattel President Robert Sansone, who shot down the toy army. If Mattel's action seems unduly cautious, it has good reason.
BUSINESS
September 13, 1991 | TOM PETRUNO
Mattel Inc. CEO John Amerman is on a roadshow for big investors this week, talking up the toy giant's prospects. He's promising double-digit earnings growth in the third and fourth quarters, and the message is falling on receptive ears in this still-lousy economy. Mattel stock rose $1 on Wednesday and $1.625 on Thursday, closing at $27.50--just shy of its 1991 peak of $27.625 reached earlier this year.
BUSINESS
September 17, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Mattel Reports Surge in Orders: Mattel Inc. said retail orders for its toys have risen about 20% compared to the same period a year ago. Mattel Chairman John W. Amerman said the company may have difficulty filling all orders from retailers because of strong worldwide demand. The El Segundo-based toy maker said August, September and October are traditionally the peak shipping months for holiday toys.
BUSINESS
May 12, 1989 | DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writer
Barbie, Mattel Inc.'s 30-year-old teen-ager, is expected to lead the Hawthorne toy maker to improved profits this year, the company said Thursday. John W. Amerman, chairman and chief executive, said at the company's annual meeting in Manhattan Beach that he expects sales of the best-selling doll to increase by $45 million to about $500 million this year. Each year, Barbie accounts for one-third to one-half of Mattel's $1 billion of sales. Amerman said he expected significant sales gains from the company's line of Disney preschool toys, which brought in about $55 million in 1988, its introductory year.
BUSINESS
December 18, 1987 | DENISE GELLENE
Raymond W. Ferris, 56, has left his job as executive vice president for strategic planning at Mattel in what the toy company described as a "mutual decision." Ferris, a 15-year veteran of Mattel's executive ranks, also resigned from the company's board . A Mattel spokesman said Ferris "planned himself out of a job." The spokesman, Shel Holtz, said Ferris came up with a plan for Hawthorne-based Mattel that called for the elimination of his own job and that the plan was accepted.
BUSINESS
November 6, 1987 | JIM SCHACHTER, Times Staff Writer
Mattel said Thursday that continuing weakness in the worldwide toy market contributed to a $14.2-million net loss and an 8% drop in sales for the quarter ending Sept. 26. The Hawthorne-based toy maker reported the third-quarter loss was also due to a charge against earnings of $19.6 million, associated primarily with the refinancing of notes due in 1989. The nation's No. 2 toy manufacturer recorded net income of $16.3 million for the same period in 1986. The company had a net loss of $12.
BUSINESS
June 5, 1987 | DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writer
Mattel, the troubled toy maker, has laid off more than 70 administrative employees over the last few weeks as part of an effort to streamline the company and reduce costs. Spencer Boise, a Mattel vice president, said Thursday that seven officers and 65 other administrative employees were laid off. Boise wouldn't identify the officers but said they were vice presidents or higher.
BUSINESS
May 8, 1987 | DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writer
The new chairman of troubled Mattel Toys said Thursday a major effort is under way to streamline the company, slash costs and make it more responsive to the changing tastes of children. More layoffs are possible at the company's headquarters in Hawthorne, where 150 managers were laid off last March, said John W. Amerman, chairman and chief executive of the company that makes Barbie dolls and Masters of the Universe.
BUSINESS
February 7, 1992 | From Times Wire Services
Toy maker Mattel Inc. said Thursday that earnings soared to record highs for the fourth quarter and the year on the strength of Barbie dolls and other toys. Earnings from the quarter ending Dec. 31, 1991, were $29.3 million, or 45 cents a share, double the previous year's $14.7 million, or 23 cents a share. For all of 1991, income rose 20% to $112.8 million, or $1.73 a share, from 1990's $91.21 million, or $1.44 per share.
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