Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJohn W Jr Hinckley
IN THE NEWS

John W Jr Hinckley

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 15, 1992 | From Associated Press
John W. Hinckley Jr., who tried to assassinate President Ronald Reagan in 1981, is liable for damages to three men he wounded in the shooting, a federal judge ruled Friday. U.S. District Court Judge John Garrett Penn said the fact that Hinckley was found innocent by reason of insanity in Reagan's shooting does not absolve him of liability for damages to former presidential Press Secretary James Brady and two security officers, Thomas K. Delahanty and Timothy J. McCarthy.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
October 18, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
The parents of presidential assailant John Hinckley are having health problems, calling into question their ability to supervise their son on his visits home, the government says. U.S. District Judge Paul Friedman loosened the restrictions on Hinckley, 51, in December, allowing the man who shot President Reagan to leave a mental hospital in Washington, D.C., to spend seven overnight visits, each of several days' duration, with his parents in Williamsburg, Va.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 10, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
John W. Hinckley Jr., who shot President Reagan in 1981, appeared in court seeking permission to visit his parents away from the mental hospital where he was been confined since 1982. Under the proposal, Hinckley, 42, would be released to his parents for monthly 12-hour visits. Psychologist Kirk Heilbrun said he is ready for the visits. However, Assistant U.S. Atty. Thomas Zeno questioned his progress and argued that Hinckley's past behavior was too erratic.
NATIONAL
December 31, 2005 | From Associated Press
A federal judge loosened the restrictions on John W. Hinckley Jr. on Friday, allowing the man who attacked President Reagan to leave his hospital for seven overnight visits with his parents in Williamsburg, Va. Hinckley, who shot Reagan in 1981, had been permitted to leave St. Elizabeths Hospital in Washington for outings around the nation's capital. He wanted to make longer trips and travel outside the area to his parents' community in southeastern Virginia. U.S. District Judge Paul L.
NEWS
November 20, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Faced with an unfavorable psychiatric evaluation, John W. Hinckley Jr. withdrew a request for monthly family visits away from a mental hospital where he was sent after trying to kill President Reagan in 1991. A court-appointed psychiatrist and psychologist rejected Hinckley's claim that he had regained his mental health, defense attorney Barry Levine acknowledged. But Levine argued that government prosecutors had "handpicked" the two therapists for the examination.
NEWS
December 4, 1992 | From Associated Press
Presidential assailant John W. Hinckley Jr. wants to take holiday leaves from a mental hospital where he was sent after shooting President Ronald Reagan, but the government says he is still a security threat. Hinckley's petition for court permission to leave the grounds of St. Elizabeths Hospital with his parents on legal holidays cites "great progress in his treatment" that has resulted in "greater privileges and liberties."
NEWS
August 13, 1988 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, Times Staff Writer
The discovery of new letters involving John W. Hinckley Jr. prompted a Washington psychiatric hospital on Friday to cancel its request to allow the presidential assailant to make a supervised field trip outside the hospital. At a hearing in U.S. District Court, administrators at St.
NEWS
April 12, 1988
A federal judge in Washington ordered presidential assailant John W. Hinckley Jr. to be questioned in a deposition prior to a civil trial arising from the 1981 shooting of President Reagan. U.S. District Judge John Garrett Penn approved a motion by lawyers representing White House Press Secretary James S. Brady and two others wounded in the March 30, 1981, shooting to question Hinckley before the case goes to trial.
NEWS
July 24, 1988
The Secret Service vowed to block any plan to grant presidential assailant John W. Hinckley Jr. a supervised day's outing from the psychiatric hospital where he has lived for the last six years. St. Elizabeths Hospital proposed a recreational day trip for Hinckley, 33, in a letter dated July 19.
NEWS
March 2, 1999 | Associated Press
The man who tried to kill Ronald Reagan 18 years ago may still pose a threat to the public and should not be allowed day trips away from a mental hospital, a federal prosecutor argued Monday. John W. Hinckley Jr. recently won court permission for supervised trips away from St. Elizabeth's Hospital despite federal prosecutors who say Hinckley remains disturbed and unpredictable. U.S. Atty.
NATIONAL
September 20, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
John W. Hinckley Jr., who tried to assassinate President Reagan, wants a girlfriend and his father wants him to marry. Hinckley's desires, along with his thwarted efforts to woo women, were revealed during a federal court hearing into his bid for visits to his parents' Virginia home, a three-hour drive from the Washington hospital where he has spent more than two decades since shooting Reagan and four other people. Hinckley was found not guilty by reason of insanity in 1982. Asst. U.S. Atty.
NATIONAL
January 17, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The Justice Department will not appeal a judge's decision allowing John W. Hinckley Jr., the man who shot President Reagan, to visit his parents without the presence of staff from a mental hospital. In a 50-page ruling Dec. 17, U.S. District Judge Paul L. Friedman granted Hinckley, 48, six unsupervised visits in the Washington area. However, he attached some strict conditions and rejected Hinckley's request to travel to his parents' home in Williamsburg, Va.
NATIONAL
November 20, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
John Hinckley Jr.'s bid for unsupervised visits with his parents got a boost as two psychiatrists testifying for the government said the request from the man who shot President Reagan in 1981 should be approved but only under more restrictions. Psychiatrists Robert Phillips and Raymond Patterson were the only witnesses called by the government as it concluded its presentation in the hearing to decide whether an unescorted Hinckley could leave St. Elizabeths Hospital to visit with his parents. U.
NATIONAL
November 18, 2003 | Faye Fiore and Shweta Govindarajan, Times Staff Writers
A federal judge heard testimony Monday asking that John W. Hinckley Jr., the man who tried to assassinate President Reagan, be permitted to leave the psychiatric hospital where he has been held for 21 years for unsupervised visits with his parents. "The unanimous opinion of the experts is that he's not dangerous," attorney Barry Levine told U.S. District Judge Paul Friedman, arguing that Hinckley's mental illness is largely in remission.
NEWS
August 14, 2000 | From the Washington Post
A psychologist at St. Elizabeths Hospital alleges she was transferred and punished after recommending that presidential assailant John W. Hinckley Jr. be permitted to leave the grounds for unsupervised visits with his parents. "My career was fine, no problems--until I wrote the recommendation in 1996," said Susan Lerner, a 15-year employee who said she has clashed with officials at the psychiatric hospital ever since. "Had it been any other patient, this never would have happened."
NEWS
July 28, 1999 | From Associated Press
The government has decided not to appeal a court ruling that allows John W. Hinckley Jr., the man who tried to kill President Reagan, to take supervised day trips from the mental hospital where he has been confined since 1982. Justice Department spokesman Myron Marlin confirmed Tuesday that the government let Monday's deadline pass without appealing to the Supreme Court for review of a federal appeals court decision. He declined to give a reason.
NEWS
April 28, 1999 | From Associated Press
John W. Hinckley Jr., the man who tried to kill President Reagan, may begin to take supervised day trips from the mental hospital where he has been confined since 1982. A federal appeals court refused Tuesday to reconsider approval of the trips. Over opposition from federal prosecutors, Hinckley won court permission in January for supervised trips away from St. Elizabeth's Hospital.
NEWS
March 2, 1999 | Associated Press
The man who tried to kill Ronald Reagan 18 years ago may still pose a threat to the public and should not be allowed day trips away from a mental hospital, a federal prosecutor argued Monday. John W. Hinckley Jr. recently won court permission for supervised trips away from St. Elizabeth's Hospital despite federal prosecutors who say Hinckley remains disturbed and unpredictable. U.S. Atty.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|