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John W Snow

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NATIONAL
December 10, 2002 | James Gerstenzang, Times Staff Writer
President Bush said Monday that he would nominate the chairman and chief executive of CSX Corp., John W. Snow, as Treasury secretary, putting a corporate leader in charge of the struggling economy as the administration turns its attention toward the 2004 elections.
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BUSINESS
July 1, 2005 | From Reuters
Two U.S. senators said Thursday that they had agreed to delay a vote on a bill threatening China with steep tariffs after being convinced that China could revalue its currency soon. Sen. Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) and Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) told reporters that they had struck a deal with Treasury Secretary John W. Snow to put their bill on hold until later this year, giving China more time to act on its own to revalue the yuan.
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BUSINESS
March 25, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
CSX Corp., the third-largest U.S. railroad owner, paid John W. Snow $60.8 million in deferred pay, stock and pension when he resigned as chief executive in January to become U.S. Treasury secretary. Snow received $8.7 million in deferred cash compensation over 17 years, $18.9 million in stock that had been accrued over 10 years and $33.2 million in a lump sum pension payment, the company said in a statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission.
NATIONAL
May 2, 2005 | Warren Vieth, Times Staff Writer
When President Bush decided two months ago to step up his campaign for Social Security restructuring, he assembled his Cabinet. Everyone was expected to play a part, Bush said, but the principal pitch man would be Treasury Secretary John W. Snow. "You need to be the guy on the Hill.... You need to be the guy doing the private meetings.... You need to be the guy doing the media and traveling," Bush told Snow, according to one administration official's account of the session. And Snow has been.
BUSINESS
January 27, 2003 | From Reuters
Lawmakers will get their chance to put U.S. Treasury nominee John W. Snow on the hot seat Tuesday as President Bush seeks to rebuild his economic team in preparation for a tax-cut battle. The wealthy rail executive is assured a courteous, but not placid, question-and-answer session before the Senate Finance Committee, which must confirm Bush's choice before he can take up his post. Snow, 63, chairman of freight transportation giant CSX Corp.
BUSINESS
July 1, 2005 | From Reuters
Two U.S. senators said Thursday that they had agreed to delay a vote on a bill threatening China with steep tariffs after being convinced that China could revalue its currency soon. Sen. Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) and Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) told reporters that they had struck a deal with Treasury Secretary John W. Snow to put their bill on hold until later this year, giving China more time to act on its own to revalue the yuan.
BUSINESS
March 26, 2003 | From Reuters and Times Staff Reports
Treasury Secretary John W. Snow said Tuesday that soaring federal deficits would not cause a "significant" rise in long-term interest rates. But even as he spoke, the Senate was voting to slash President Bush's proposed $726-billion tax cut to around $350 billion, as opponents argued that the nation couldn't afford Bush's plan with federal borrowing already surging. Snow, speaking to the National Assn.
NATIONAL
January 31, 2003 | From Associated Press
The Senate approved President Bush's nomination of John W. Snow as Treasury secretary Thursday night after the railroad executive gave assurances he would review a department rule on pensions that opponents contend discriminates against older workers. The nomination of the administration's top economic spokesman was approved by voice vote after many senators had already left the Capitol to begin a three-day weekend. Snow, the head of railroad giant CSX Corp.
NATIONAL
May 12, 2003 | Peter G. Gosselin, Times Staff Writer
Warning that the U.S. economy is stuck in a "soggy" recovery, Treasury Secretary John W. Snow on Sunday brushed aside deficit worries and called on Congress to approve President Bush's tax-cutting "jobs and growth" plan -- or something close to it. Appearing on four television talk shows during the day, Snow asserted that the biggest economic problem facing the country is a "jobs deficit." "We need to get our priorities right.
NATIONAL
December 17, 2004 | Joel Havemann, Times Staff Writer
As opponents of the idea mobilized, Treasury Secretary John W. Snow predicted Thursday that Congress would approve President Bush's still-sketchy plan to let workers shift some of their Social Security payroll tax payments into private retirement accounts that they would invest, with what Snow said would be little risk to themselves.
NATIONAL
December 17, 2004 | Joel Havemann, Times Staff Writer
As opponents of the idea mobilized, Treasury Secretary John W. Snow predicted Thursday that Congress would approve President Bush's still-sketchy plan to let workers shift some of their Social Security payroll tax payments into private retirement accounts that they would invest, with what Snow said would be little risk to themselves.
NATIONAL
December 9, 2004 | Warren Vieth and Edwin Chen, Times Staff Writers
President Bush on Wednesday asked Treasury Secretary John W. Snow to stay on the job during his second term, ending more than a week of rampant speculation and high-level leaks that suggested the White House was ready to sack him. Snow, 65, will continue to serve as the nation's chief financial officer and leader of the president's economic team, making him the point man for selling Bush's ambitious plans to restructure Social Security and revamp the U.S. tax code.
NATIONAL
May 12, 2003 | Peter G. Gosselin, Times Staff Writer
Warning that the U.S. economy is stuck in a "soggy" recovery, Treasury Secretary John W. Snow on Sunday brushed aside deficit worries and called on Congress to approve President Bush's tax-cutting "jobs and growth" plan -- or something close to it. Appearing on four television talk shows during the day, Snow asserted that the biggest economic problem facing the country is a "jobs deficit." "We need to get our priorities right.
BUSINESS
March 26, 2003 | From Reuters and Times Staff Reports
Treasury Secretary John W. Snow said Tuesday that soaring federal deficits would not cause a "significant" rise in long-term interest rates. But even as he spoke, the Senate was voting to slash President Bush's proposed $726-billion tax cut to around $350 billion, as opponents argued that the nation couldn't afford Bush's plan with federal borrowing already surging. Snow, speaking to the National Assn.
BUSINESS
March 25, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
CSX Corp., the third-largest U.S. railroad owner, paid John W. Snow $60.8 million in deferred pay, stock and pension when he resigned as chief executive in January to become U.S. Treasury secretary. Snow received $8.7 million in deferred cash compensation over 17 years, $18.9 million in stock that had been accrued over 10 years and $33.2 million in a lump sum pension payment, the company said in a statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission.
NATIONAL
January 31, 2003 | From Associated Press
The Senate approved President Bush's nomination of John W. Snow as Treasury secretary Thursday night after the railroad executive gave assurances he would review a department rule on pensions that opponents contend discriminates against older workers. The nomination of the administration's top economic spokesman was approved by voice vote after many senators had already left the Capitol to begin a three-day weekend. Snow, the head of railroad giant CSX Corp.
NATIONAL
December 9, 2004 | Warren Vieth and Edwin Chen, Times Staff Writers
President Bush on Wednesday asked Treasury Secretary John W. Snow to stay on the job during his second term, ending more than a week of rampant speculation and high-level leaks that suggested the White House was ready to sack him. Snow, 65, will continue to serve as the nation's chief financial officer and leader of the president's economic team, making him the point man for selling Bush's ambitious plans to restructure Social Security and revamp the U.S. tax code.
NATIONAL
January 29, 2003 | Warren Vieth, Times Staff Writer
Treasury Secretary-designate John W. Snow expressed concern Tuesday about the long-term consequences of rising deficits but insisted that President Bush's tax cuts would not push the nation into the danger zone. During a four-hour confirmation hearing before the Senate Finance Committee, Snow parried questions about the economy, the dollar and his own compensation as a corporate chief executive.
NATIONAL
January 29, 2003 | Warren Vieth, Times Staff Writer
Treasury Secretary-designate John W. Snow expressed concern Tuesday about the long-term consequences of rising deficits but insisted that President Bush's tax cuts would not push the nation into the danger zone. During a four-hour confirmation hearing before the Senate Finance Committee, Snow parried questions about the economy, the dollar and his own compensation as a corporate chief executive.
BUSINESS
January 27, 2003 | From Reuters
Lawmakers will get their chance to put U.S. Treasury nominee John W. Snow on the hot seat Tuesday as President Bush seeks to rebuild his economic team in preparation for a tax-cut battle. The wealthy rail executive is assured a courteous, but not placid, question-and-answer session before the Senate Finance Committee, which must confirm Bush's choice before he can take up his post. Snow, 63, chairman of freight transportation giant CSX Corp.
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