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John W Teets

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NEWS
September 15, 1987 | PAUL RICHTER, Times Staff Writer
Arizonans do not always look fondly on The Greyhound Corp. It has battled unions, sold off its bus lines and 18 other businesses and has been criticized for skimping on charitable contributions. Yet, when John W. Teets, Greyhound's tough-talking chief executive, in July asked the state's lawmakers to enact emergency measures to protect the Phoenix company from takeovers, the Arizona Legislature fairly snapped to attention.
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NEWS
September 15, 1987 | PAUL RICHTER, Times Staff Writer
Arizonans do not always look fondly on The Greyhound Corp. It has battled unions, sold off its bus lines and 18 other businesses and has been criticized for skimping on charitable contributions. Yet, when John W. Teets, Greyhound's tough-talking chief executive, in July asked the state's lawmakers to enact emergency measures to protect the Phoenix company from takeovers, the Arizona Legislature fairly snapped to attention.
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BUSINESS
January 13, 1987
General Motors manufactures the RTS transit bus in Pontiac, Mich., and the Classic in St. Eustache, Canada, Phoenix-based Greyhound Corp. said. John W. Teets, Greyhound chairman and chief executive, said the acquisition of GM's transit bus facilities represent an "excellent fit" with Greyhound's current bus-building operations. Terms of the deal were not disclosed.
BUSINESS
January 8, 1985
John W. Teets, chairman and chief executive of Phoenix-based Greyhound Corp., said the plan involves Greyhound Lines' inter-city bus operations. He said the arrangement will allow an operator to provide a variety of bus services, including interline passenger and package express services linking with Greyhound Lines routes. The licensing and franchising opportunities will apply not only to regular routes but also to charter service and to express bus service to airports, spokesmen said.
BUSINESS
July 17, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Dial to Pursue Split; Teets to Retire: Despite opposition by a major stockholder, Dial Corp. said it plans to proceed with the previously announced spinoff of its services lines--which include one of the nation's largest airline food operations--into a new company called Viad Corp. Phoenix-based Dial, which will keep its consumer-goods units that include its namesake soap, also said Chairman John W. Teets, 62, plans to retire early next year.
BUSINESS
May 16, 1985
The Phoenix-based company said it has decided to focus the resources of its bus subsidiary on trips of less than five hours because the long-haul business has been taken over by the airlines, a company executive said. Greyhound Chairman John W. Teets said he blamed a "bad marketing strategy" for the $1.3-million loss in 1984 by its Greyhound Lines unit. He said Greyhound Lines, which accounts for about 31% of the company's revenue, "failed to recognize that long-haul business is dead."
BUSINESS
May 2, 1986
Greyhound Corp. reported net income of $10.3 million on combined revenue of $751 million for the quarter ended March 31, down sharply from the $19.1-million profit on revenue of $680 million reported in the first quarter of 1985. John W. Teets, chairman and chief executive of the Phoenix-based company, attributed the decline to gains from 1985 real estate transactions involving Greyhound Lines and to high claim losses by a mortgage insurance unit, Verex. Greyhound Corp.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1986 | Associated Press
About 3,000 employees will lose their jobs as Greyhound Corp. turns over 96 bus stations to independent operators who will receive a percentage of terminal business, company officials announced Monday. Severance pay and other expenses related to the move will cost Greyhound about $15 million, to be taken out of Greyhound's second-quarter after-tax earnings, John W. Teets, Greyhound chairman and chief executive, said in a statement.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1986 | Associated Press
About 3,000 employees will lose their jobs as Greyhound Corp. turns over 96 bus stations to independent operators who will receive a percentage of terminal business, company officials announced Monday. Severance pay and other expenses related to the move will cost Greyhound about $15 million, to be taken out of Greyhound's second-quarter after-tax earnings, John W. Teets, Greyhound chairman and chief executive, said in a statement.
NEWS
August 15, 1985
Greyhound Lines, which lost $1.3 million in 1984, announced today that it will abolish 400 management jobs and lay off 1,500 rank-and-file workers to reflect the declining number of travelers using intercity bus service. John W. Teets, chairman of the board and chief executive officer of parent Greyhound Corp., said the moves will reduce the subsidiary's facilities, fleet and personnel "to a level consistent with the current competitive and economic climate in the intercity bus industry."
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