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NEWS
April 16, 1987
Shuttle commander John W. Young, who has been highly critical of NASA safety policies, stepped down as chief astronaut at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida for a management post at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, officials said. Young, 56, America's most experienced astronaut with a record six flights, will serve as special assistant for engineering, operations and safety.
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NEWS
July 30, 1987 | United Press International
Astronaut John W. Young, a frequent critic of shuttle safety policies, says he was forced to give up his job as chief astronaut, but a top NASA official Wednesday defended the management change. In his first public comment on the issue since his transfer to a new post in April, Young told the Orlando Sentinel in Florida that he suspects his removal as chief of the astronaut office was triggered in part by his sharp public criticism of NASA safety policies after the Challenger disaster.
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NEWS
July 30, 1987 | United Press International
Astronaut John W. Young, a frequent critic of shuttle safety policies, says he was forced to give up his job as chief astronaut, but a top NASA official Wednesday defended the management change. In his first public comment on the issue since his transfer to a new post in April, Young told the Orlando Sentinel in Florida that he suspects his removal as chief of the astronaut office was triggered in part by his sharp public criticism of NASA safety policies after the Challenger disaster.
NEWS
April 16, 1987
Shuttle commander John W. Young, who has been highly critical of NASA safety policies, stepped down as chief astronaut at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida for a management post at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, officials said. Young, 56, America's most experienced astronaut with a record six flights, will serve as special assistant for engineering, operations and safety.
NEWS
March 20, 1987 | United Press International
Astronaut John W. Young, contradicting a top NASA official who said Thursday that he remains optimistic, said the planned Feb. 18, 1988, launching date for the first post-Challenger flight will be impossible to meet. "It sure ain't gonna be in February," the outspoken watchdog of NASA's recovery from the Challenger explosion told the Houston Chronicle in a report published Thursday. "If it were to be in February, we'd leave a lot of things out."
NEWS
March 28, 1988 | JAMES MARNELL, JAMES MARNELL,
--Former White House spokesman Larry Speakes will likely raise more than a few eyebrows with his soon-to-be published book, "Speaking Out." Excerpts of the book, which was co-authored by Washington writer Robert Pack, were published over the weekend in U.S. News & World Report. Although he calls President Reagan a super guy, Speakes heaps harsh words on other Administration officials--including members of the First Family.
NEWS
January 9, 1987 | United Press International
Veteran astronaut Frederick H. Hauck and four other experienced space fliers were named today to blast off aboard Discovery in 1988 for the first shuttle mission since the Challenger disaster, NASA announced. Discovery is tentatively scheduled for launch Feb. 18, 1988.
NEWS
April 3, 1986 | RUDY ABRAMSON, Times Staff Writer
The loss of the shuttle Challenger has further threatened the United States' already-endangered leadership in space research and technology, a panel of educators and industry executives reported Wednesday. Reporting on a yearlong study, the panel called for the United States to press forward with exploration and the commercial development of space. The task force, which wrote its report four days before the Jan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1986
The National Aeronautics and Space Administration, reeling from the loss of the space shuttle Challenger and its crew, now says that it wants to use unmanned rockets to loft some satellites into orbit. Better late than never. It has been clear for more than a year that old-fashioned expendable rockets offer a cheaper, more reliable way of putting commercial and military satellites into orbit than the complicated and finicky shuttles do.
NEWS
March 14, 1986 | RUDY ABRAMSON, Times Staff Writer
A Florida congressman who flew aboard the space shuttle Columbia two months ago announced plans Thursday for a "fair but tough" investigation of shuttle flight safety, focusing on the Columbia launch that took place only 16 days before the Challenger disaster. Rep. Bill Nelson (D-Fla.
NEWS
March 9, 1986 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, Times Staff Writer
Pressure to meet space shuttle launching schedules seriously compromised safety even before the Challenger disaster and endangered the lives of "some very lucky" flight crews, chief astronaut John W. Young charged in an internal memo released Saturday. In the memo, dated last Tuesday, Young, chief of the astronaut office at the Johnson Space Center here, warned that steps must be taken to ensure that "we do not lose any more space shuttles and flight crews."
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