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John Walker Lindh

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OPINION
June 10, 2002
Re "Lindh Knew of Attack Plans Worse Than 9/11, Prosecutors Say," June 5: Earlier reports by The Times and other U.S. media indicated that the terrorists who carry out terrorist activities--including 9/11--are customarily not informed of their missions or targets in advance. How come prosecutors in John Walker Lindh's case are now saying that Lindh knew of an alleged 20 suicide operations involving 50 operatives? What is Lindh's real rank in the Taliban or Al Qaeda network? It just doesn't add up that he wields this much power.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2013 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO - John Walker Lindh, the Marin County man imprisoned for fighting with the Taliban, has won the right to have daily communal Muslim prayer in the U.S. prison unit where he is incarcerated. An Indiana judge, ruling in a lawsuit brought by Lindh, ordered a Terre Haute prison warden to end a ban on daily group prayer for Lindh and more than 40 other Muslim inmates. The judge said the ban violated a federal law that protects the religious rights of prison inmates. Lindh, who converted to Islam while living with his family in San Anselmo, is serving a 20-year prison sentence.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2013 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO - John Walker Lindh, the Marin County man imprisoned for fighting with the Taliban, has won the right to have daily communal Muslim prayer in the U.S. prison unit where he is incarcerated. An Indiana judge, ruling in a lawsuit brought by Lindh, ordered a Terre Haute prison warden to end a ban on daily group prayer for Lindh and more than 40 other Muslim inmates. The judge said the ban violated a federal law that protects the religious rights of prison inmates. Lindh, who converted to Islam while living with his family in San Anselmo, is serving a 20-year prison sentence.
OPINION
August 30, 2012
More than a decade after he was captured in Afghanistan, John Walker Lindh, the so-called "American Taliban," was in a federal court in Indiana this week seeking not his release from a federal prison in Terre Haute but the right to pray with fellow Muslim inmates several times a day. Lindh makes a plausible case that the facility is needlessly restricting his rights under federal law. Lindh, a teenage convert to Islam who joined the Taliban before...
OPINION
August 30, 2012
More than a decade after he was captured in Afghanistan, John Walker Lindh, the so-called "American Taliban," was in a federal court in Indiana this week seeking not his release from a federal prison in Terre Haute but the right to pray with fellow Muslim inmates several times a day. Lindh makes a plausible case that the facility is needlessly restricting his rights under federal law. Lindh, a teenage convert to Islam who joined the Taliban before...
NATIONAL
July 6, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
A Cable News Network reporter asked a federal judge to reject a subpoena from American Taliban fighter John Walker Lindh that seeks his testimony at Lindh's trial. The request was filed by attorneys for Robert Pelton, who interviewed Lindh in Afghanistan. Pelton's lawyers said requiring him to testify would intrude on his "safety and rights independently to gather news."
OPINION
January 25, 2002
Jonathan Chase thinks John Walker Lindh was "looking for religion" with the Taliban (letter, Jan. 21). He had already found his religion here in the U.S., and there wasn't a better place for him to practice it. He didn't need to go to Afghanistan and take terrorist training to find it. Just who did he think this terrorist training would be used against, other than the "Great Satan"--the U.S.? Glenn Turner Woodland Hills
OPINION
July 25, 2002
Does anyone but me see the irony in the cases of the idealistic but clueless 21-year-old John Walker Lindh, who just got a stiff federal prison sentence for fighting for the Taliban, and the equally idealistic and clueless 16-year-old Bahram Rahman, who left his home in Pakistan to fight for the Taliban and is now being held indefinitely in appalling conditions in Dasht-i-Shardian by Afghan warlords (July 21)? It would seem that their grieving parents have a good deal in common. Georgiana F. Coughlan Gardena
OPINION
February 10, 2002
I highly approve of the decision made by U.S. Magistrate W. Curtis Sewell in not allowing John Walker Lindh to be placed in the custody of his father ("Lindh E-Mails Unsympathetic," Feb. 7). The father has shown that he did a lousy job of parenting leading up to this; why should he be trusted now? The father claims his son was just a teenage kid trying to find himself. Well, he found himself in the wrong place. Erwin Blake Palm Desert Why should the American people have to pay to support Lindh in comfort in prison?
OPINION
October 10, 2002
Re "20-Year Sentence for Lindh," Oct. 5: John Walker Lindh was clearly misguided in joining the Taliban prior to 9/11 and taking up its cause. He may have unintentionally violated U.S. law, which might warrant punishment, but the 20-year sentence handed down was unfortunately wrapped in the hysteria and politics of revenge. Bringing in the murder of CIA agent Johnny "Mike" Spann and 9/11, which Lindh had no part in, during sentencing was meant to help justify this to the public. It should be noted that almost all of the original Afghan Taliban soldiers, who were clearly more culpable that Lindh, were released by the new government back to their villages.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2009 | Associated Press
Federal prison officials are easing restrictions on American-born Taliban soldier John Walker Lindh, moves that his attorney said Wednesday will allow Lindh to tell his story for the first time. U.S. Department of Justice spokesman Dean Boyd said the restrictions on Lindh, 28, will expire Friday. He said the limits are not public and he cannot discuss them.
NATIONAL
January 28, 2009 | Josh Meyer
On his last full day in office, President Bush formally struck down the clemency petitions of junk-bond financier Michael Milken and some high-profile former politicians, including Randy "Duke" Cunningham and Edwin Edwards, the Justice Department said Tuesday. The former president also denied petitions for two men who became polarizing symbols of their eras.
WORLD
June 3, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
A British human rights organization says the U.S. used military ships to secretly detain and interrogate terrorism suspects. U.S. officials denied using ships as prisons. The group Reprieve alleged that high-profile detainees, including American-born Taliban soldier John Walker Lindh and Australian Taliban supporter David Hicks, were imprisoned on the vessels. Reprieve says the U.S. has used ships stationed off the Somali coast and the Indian Ocean island of Diego Garcia to detain suspects.
OPINION
July 31, 2007
Re "Free our Talib," editorial, July 29 Your editorial advocating the freeing of John Walker Lindh was disgusting. Lindh chose his fate when he refused to identify himself to his American captors, and then when he refused to warn his American interrogators of the impending prisoner attack in the Afghan prison. He is as responsible for the death of CIA operative Johnny "Mike" Spann as the terrorists who shot Spann. Lindh should have been sentenced to death for that.
OPINION
July 29, 2007
The president's power to grant clemency -- in the form of either a pardon or a commutation -- is much maligned and occasionally abused, as was the case when President Bush used it to keep his colleague, I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby, from facing even a day in prison for lying and obstructing justice. But the power has its appropriate uses as well, and the case of John Walker Lindh calls out for it.
NATIONAL
April 5, 2007 | Richard A. Serrano, Times Staff Writer
The parents of "American Taliban" John Walker Lindh, who is serving a 20-year sentence in the country's toughest federal prison, stepped up their request for his release Wednesday by noting that the first U.S. war crimes tribunal in Guantanamo Bay recently resulted in a sentence of nine months for an Australian detainee held in U.S. custody since late 2001. "John has been in prison for more than five years," said his mother, Marilyn Walker. "It's time for him to come home."
WORLD
June 3, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
A British human rights organization says the U.S. used military ships to secretly detain and interrogate terrorism suspects. U.S. officials denied using ships as prisons. The group Reprieve alleged that high-profile detainees, including American-born Taliban soldier John Walker Lindh and Australian Taliban supporter David Hicks, were imprisoned on the vessels. Reprieve says the U.S. has used ships stationed off the Somali coast and the Indian Ocean island of Diego Garcia to detain suspects.
OPINION
April 18, 2002
Either those criticizing the Special Forces concerning the picture of Taliban fighter John Walker Lindh naked and trussed up have short memories or are hypocrites ("U.S. Soldiers Posed for Photos With Lindh," April 13). Show us again the pictures of airplanes hitting the World Trade Center and of the twin towers crumpling on Sept. 11 as a result of the terrorism of Lindh's compatriots in the Taliban. Then maybe the critics will remember what it's all about. Then let them admit who among them wouldn't be wary of a captured traitor; who among them wouldn't want to record the triumph of capturing and, yes, humiliating a supporter of Arab terrorism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2006 | Rone Tempest, Times Staff Writer
His son is serving time in a Mojave Desert federal prison. But Frank Lindh, the ever-loyal father of the young Marin County native the tabloids dubbed "the American Taliban" has not given up trying to get John Walker Lindh out of jail. Last month, defense attorneys petitioned President Bush for commutation of the 20-year, no-parole term the son, a devout Muslim convert, received from a U.S. district judge in Virginia in 2002. The request is pending.
OPINION
October 2, 2004
Re "Prisoner's Release Spurs Lindh to Ask for Clemency," Sept. 29: Immediately after 9/11, Americans were in a hysterical and vengeful state. Someone had to be blamed, and John Walker Lindh was an easy target, as he was portrayed as a supporter of terrorism and Al Qaeda. The political climate at the time would not have afforded him a fair trial, so he was advised to plead guilty to lesser charges and be sentenced to 20 years in federal prison. The reality is this was a very young man in a misguided personal journey who had, before 9/11, joined the Taliban to fight for an idealized Islamic state.
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