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NEWS
September 15, 2002
Two points about Tim Rutten's story ("McPaper at 20: A Brief List of Successes," Sept. 6) on USA Today's 20th anniversary: In identifying the paper's audience as "laptop-toting business travelers," Rutten has failed to check the coffee shops and convenience stores in his own neighborhood. Smart circulation directors know--and should worry-- that a great unrecognized story of USA Today's success is in the ordinary, nontraveling folks--especially young people, women of all ages, and just-moved families--who prefer it to the local daily.
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BUSINESS
October 9, 2010 | By E. Scott Reckard, Los Angeles Times
Jurors in the fraud trial of former Countrywide Financial Corp. executives will be allowed to see e-mails and a handwritten note from the lender's former chief financial officer, who said he feared becoming a "magnet [for] prosecution" and told his father, "I can lose my net worth or go to jail for things I don't even know," a judge ruled Friday. The documents "go to the heart of the issues in this case" by shedding light on the thinking of former CFO Eric P. Sieracki, U.S. District Judge John J. Walter said in making his decision.
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NEWS
March 11, 2004 | Steven Rosen, Special to The Times
Suicide is always a tragedy. Yet in the mysterious case of artist Ray Johnson, who jumped off a bridge into Long Island's Sag Harbor on Friday the 13th in January 1995, the act also was a final performance piece. It was filled with references to the unlucky number 13, including his age, 67 (6+7=13). And at his home in Locust Valley, Long Island, police found stacks of Johnson's artworks facing the wall. Only a small portrait of him faced outward -- as if he were staring at them.
NEWS
March 11, 2004 | Steven Rosen, Special to The Times
Suicide is always a tragedy. Yet in the mysterious case of artist Ray Johnson, who jumped off a bridge into Long Island's Sag Harbor on Friday the 13th in January 1995, the act also was a final performance piece. It was filled with references to the unlucky number 13, including his age, 67 (6+7=13). And at his home in Locust Valley, Long Island, police found stacks of Johnson's artworks facing the wall. Only a small portrait of him faced outward -- as if he were staring at them.
BUSINESS
December 23, 1996 | From Associated Press
Putting his first major stamp on AT&T Corp., new President John R. Walter has replaced the head of the company's ailing consumer unit with one of its top marketing managers. Gail J. McGovern, executive vice president of AT&T's business markets division, succeeds Joseph P. Nacchio in running the consumer and small business unit.
NATIONAL
July 13, 2003 | From Associated Press
The nation's drug czar began calling on local religious leaders Saturday to help in the war on drugs. John P. Walters, director of National Drug Control Policy, announced last week his national drive to enlist faith-based youth groups in anti-drug programs. The drive is the Bush administration's latest effort to expand the role of religious organizations in government services.
BUSINESS
February 28, 1997 | From Times Wires Services
AT&T Corp. President John R. Walter on Thursday pushed ahead with a much-awaited overhaul of the company, centralizing control of its disparate businesses and cutting hundreds of management jobs. The action, just four months after Walter was hired as the future replacement for Chairman and Chief Executive Robert E. Allen, is intended to revitalize core businesses, cut costs and make management more accountable to Walter.
BUSINESS
October 24, 1996 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tapping a relative unknown to solve its high-profile problems, AT&T Corp. surprised the business world Wednesday by naming John R. Walter, 49-year-old chairman of commercial printer R.R. Donnelley & Sons Co., as the telephone giant's new president, chief operating officer and heir to Chairman and Chief Executive Robert E. Allen.
BUSINESS
October 9, 2010 | By E. Scott Reckard, Los Angeles Times
Jurors in the fraud trial of former Countrywide Financial Corp. executives will be allowed to see e-mails and a handwritten note from the lender's former chief financial officer, who said he feared becoming a "magnet [for] prosecution" and told his father, "I can lose my net worth or go to jail for things I don't even know," a judge ruled Friday. The documents "go to the heart of the issues in this case" by shedding light on the thinking of former CFO Eric P. Sieracki, U.S. District Judge John J. Walter said in making his decision.
NATIONAL
July 13, 2003 | From Associated Press
The nation's drug czar began calling on local religious leaders Saturday to help in the war on drugs. John P. Walters, director of National Drug Control Policy, announced last week his national drive to enlist faith-based youth groups in anti-drug programs. The drive is the Bush administration's latest effort to expand the role of religious organizations in government services.
NEWS
September 15, 2002
Two points about Tim Rutten's story ("McPaper at 20: A Brief List of Successes," Sept. 6) on USA Today's 20th anniversary: In identifying the paper's audience as "laptop-toting business travelers," Rutten has failed to check the coffee shops and convenience stores in his own neighborhood. Smart circulation directors know--and should worry-- that a great unrecognized story of USA Today's success is in the ordinary, nontraveling folks--especially young people, women of all ages, and just-moved families--who prefer it to the local daily.
BUSINESS
February 28, 1997 | From Times Wires Services
AT&T Corp. President John R. Walter on Thursday pushed ahead with a much-awaited overhaul of the company, centralizing control of its disparate businesses and cutting hundreds of management jobs. The action, just four months after Walter was hired as the future replacement for Chairman and Chief Executive Robert E. Allen, is intended to revitalize core businesses, cut costs and make management more accountable to Walter.
BUSINESS
December 23, 1996 | From Associated Press
Putting his first major stamp on AT&T Corp., new President John R. Walter has replaced the head of the company's ailing consumer unit with one of its top marketing managers. Gail J. McGovern, executive vice president of AT&T's business markets division, succeeds Joseph P. Nacchio in running the consumer and small business unit.
BUSINESS
October 24, 1996 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tapping a relative unknown to solve its high-profile problems, AT&T Corp. surprised the business world Wednesday by naming John R. Walter, 49-year-old chairman of commercial printer R.R. Donnelley & Sons Co., as the telephone giant's new president, chief operating officer and heir to Chairman and Chief Executive Robert E. Allen.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2010 | By Sarah Weinman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It was an improbable Cinderella story. "The Shack," William Paul Young's novel about a man rediscovering lost faith after the murder of his 5-year-old daughter, started out as a manuscript no one would touch. Finally, pastors Wayne Jacobsen and Brad Cummings discovered the book and created a start-up, Windblown Media, to publish it. The novel sold a million copies for them in the first year, eventually ending up at No. 1 on the New York Times' trade paperback bestseller list. Then Hachette Book Group got involved.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1985
A 35-year-old man was killed almost instantly early Wednesday after his car crashed into the rear of a legally parked truck-and-trailer rig in Stanton, police said. John Walter Buse, who most recently lived in Whittier, suffered head and neck injuries and was pronounced dead at the scene, according to Stanton police Sgt. Dan Amon. No one was in the truck, which was parked on Garden Grove Boulevard near Sycamore Street.
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