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OPINION
March 24, 2011
Liz: A March 24 editorial on the death of Elizabeth Taylor mentioned her marriage to "then-Sen. John Warner of Virginia. " He was not yet a senator when they married.
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OPINION
March 24, 2011
Liz: A March 24 editorial on the death of Elizabeth Taylor mentioned her marriage to "then-Sen. John Warner of Virginia. " He was not yet a senator when they married.
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NEWS
October 10, 1996 | From The Washington Post
An increasingly nasty Virginia Senate race took a bizarre turn Wednesday, as Sen. John W. Warner's campaign acknowledged that its new ad contains a picture altered to make it appear that Democratic challenger Mark R. Warner is shaking hands with former Gov. L. Douglas Wilder and President Clinton. The picture--in a commercial that casts Mark Warner as a liberal "political insider"--is similar to one that appeared in the Washington Post and several other newspapers on Oct.
NATIONAL
November 1, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Republican Sen. John W. Warner was hospitalized for the third time in a month for what his office called a "low-grade infection" related to his treatment for a minor heart problem. Doctors discovered an infection in the 80-year-old senator's thigh during a follow-up appointment at Inova Fairfax Hospital, according to a statement from Warner's office. He was admitted for treatment and observation.
NATIONAL
November 1, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Republican Sen. John W. Warner was hospitalized for the third time in a month for what his office called a "low-grade infection" related to his treatment for a minor heart problem. Doctors discovered an infection in the 80-year-old senator's thigh during a follow-up appointment at Inova Fairfax Hospital, according to a statement from Warner's office. He was admitted for treatment and observation.
NATIONAL
September 1, 2007 | Richard Simon, Times Staff Writer
Sen. John W. Warner (R-Va.), one of the most respected voices in Congress on military affairs, announced his retirement on Friday, delivering another blow to a GOP shaken by a spate of troubles and boosting Democratic hopes of increasing their slim Senate majority. "My work and service to Virginia as a senator will conclude on the 6th of January, 2009," the 80-year-old senator said at a news conference at the University of Virginia, with his wife, Jeanne, at his side.
NEWS
June 11, 1996 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. John W. Warner has won more statewide elections in Virginia than any Republican in the 20th century. He was seen as so invulnerable in 1990 that the Democrats didn't even field a candidate against him.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1992 | TED JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For many Orange County executives, 1991 was a year when their pay packages came under greater shareholder scrutiny and corporate boards were cautious in handing out cash bonuses and perks. It mirrored a trend statewide of keeping executive compensation in line with a company's financial performance. Of the top 100 county executives on the list of publicly traded companies, one-third of the officers saw their cash compensation remain unchanged or had it reduced.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1996 | MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After Elizabeth Taylor and Welsh actor Richard Burton divorced in 1973, she offered a lofty explanation for the breakup: "We have loved each other too much." After she filed for divorce Monday from her seventh husband, construction worker Larry Fortensky, her explanation was prosaic: "irreconcilable differences." "The whole thing will be worked out amicably between Elizabeth and Larry," said Taylor's attorney, Neil Papiano.
OPINION
January 28, 2007
SEN. RICHARD G. LUGAR (R-Ind.) was once considered one of the Senate's foremost foreign policy experts, while Sen. John W. Warner (R-Va.) was, well, not. Now, if you believe the Beltway buzz, their reputations have been reversed. Even if that reversal were justified -- and it isn't -- it shows that the president isn't the only politician in Washington whose career has been hobbled by Iraq.
NATIONAL
September 1, 2007 | Richard Simon, Times Staff Writer
Sen. John W. Warner (R-Va.), one of the most respected voices in Congress on military affairs, announced his retirement on Friday, delivering another blow to a GOP shaken by a spate of troubles and boosting Democratic hopes of increasing their slim Senate majority. "My work and service to Virginia as a senator will conclude on the 6th of January, 2009," the 80-year-old senator said at a news conference at the University of Virginia, with his wife, Jeanne, at his side.
OPINION
January 28, 2007
SEN. RICHARD G. LUGAR (R-Ind.) was once considered one of the Senate's foremost foreign policy experts, while Sen. John W. Warner (R-Va.) was, well, not. Now, if you believe the Beltway buzz, their reputations have been reversed. Even if that reversal were justified -- and it isn't -- it shows that the president isn't the only politician in Washington whose career has been hobbled by Iraq.
NEWS
October 10, 1996 | From The Washington Post
An increasingly nasty Virginia Senate race took a bizarre turn Wednesday, as Sen. John W. Warner's campaign acknowledged that its new ad contains a picture altered to make it appear that Democratic challenger Mark R. Warner is shaking hands with former Gov. L. Douglas Wilder and President Clinton. The picture--in a commercial that casts Mark Warner as a liberal "political insider"--is similar to one that appeared in the Washington Post and several other newspapers on Oct.
NEWS
June 11, 1996 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. John W. Warner has won more statewide elections in Virginia than any Republican in the 20th century. He was seen as so invulnerable in 1990 that the Democrats didn't even field a candidate against him.
BUSINESS
May 26, 1993 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Warner, the newly selected chief executive officer at Ocean Pacific Apparel Corp., knows that the surf-wear company's future will be determined by how well it blends the new and the old. "We have an opportunity to refocus a company . . . that has an overwhelmingly positive image among consumers," said Warner, 43. "But we have to get everyone in the organization heading in the same direction . . . concentrating on putting out the best product in the marketplace."
BUSINESS
July 2, 1991 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Quiksilver Inc., a leading maker of surf wear, said Monday that John C. Warner has stepped down as chairman and chief executive. He will be replaced by Robert B. McKnight, the company's president and founder. The change comes as Quiksilver is striving to improve earnings, which have been depressed by the recession and price-cutting in the apparel industry. But McKnight said Warner's departure is unrelated to the company's financial performance. "It's something we both wanted," McKnight said.
BUSINESS
July 2, 1991 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Quiksilver Inc., a leading maker of surf wear, said Monday that John C. Warner has stepped down as chairman and chief executive. He will be replaced by Robert B. McKnight, the company's president and founder. The change comes as Quiksilver is striving to improve earnings, which have been depressed by the recession and price-cutting in the apparel industry. But McKnight said Warner's departure is unrelated to the company's financial performance. "It's something we both wanted," McKnight said.
BUSINESS
May 26, 1993 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Warner, the newly selected chief executive officer at Ocean Pacific Apparel Corp., knows that the surf-wear company's future will be determined by how well it blends the new and the old. "We have an opportunity to refocus a company . . . that has an overwhelmingly positive image among consumers," said Warner, 43. "But we have to get everyone in the organization heading in the same direction . . . concentrating on putting out the best product in the marketplace."
BOOKS
June 3, 1990 | CHARLES SOLOMON
John Taylor chronicles and laments the elevation of greed from the status of Deadly Sin to national ideal during the 1980s in this brief social history. He recounts the fiscal shenanigans of investment banker Charlie Atkins (who spent an estimated $18 million a year on himself during the early '80s); watches artist Mark Kostabi grind out high-priced paintings in his loft-factory, and shares the gaucheries of billionairess Susan Gutfreund.
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