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John Wasmuth

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1996 | MARTIN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A team of UC Irvine and British researchers have discovered the gene for a hereditary disorder that can cause severe facial anomalies and hearing loss, UCI officials announced Friday. Chromosome research led by UCI biochemist John Wasmuth, who died in December, contributed to isolating the Treacher Collins gene, officials said. In his final complete work to be published, Wasmuth's findings appear in the February issue of the science journal Nature Genetics.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1996 | MARTIN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A team of UC Irvine and British researchers have discovered the gene for a hereditary disorder that can cause severe facial anomalies and hearing loss, UCI officials announced Friday. Chromosome research led by UCI biochemist John Wasmuth, who died in December, contributed to isolating the Treacher Collins gene, officials said. In his final complete work to be published, Wasmuth's findings appear in the February issue of the science journal Nature Genetics.
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NEWS
March 24, 1993 | JOHN NEEDHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
UC Irvine Prof. John Wasmuth once described his eight-year search for the gene that causes Huntington's disease as a fascinating "detective story," one that would some day end in success. "Oh sure," he said, the gene "will be found. I used to say, in a year, in a year. . . . I thought it would be found by now." Tuesday he was finally proved right. Wasmuth joined colleagues from around the country who had cooperated in an extraordinary collaborative effort to locate the gene.
NEWS
March 24, 1993 | JOHN NEEDHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
UC Irvine Prof. John Wasmuth once described his eight-year search for the gene that causes Huntington's disease as a fascinating "detective story," one that would some day end in success. "Oh sure," he said, the gene "will be found. I used to say, in a year, in a year. . . . I thought it would be found by now." Tuesday he was finally proved right. Wasmuth joined colleagues from around the country who had cooperated in an extraordinary collaborative effort to locate the gene.
NEWS
January 31, 1993 | JOHN NEEDHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Inside the cells are the chromosomes, and inside the chromosomes are the genes and inside the genes are the problems. Sometimes you can miss one, nick another and nothing happens. But sometimes you break one gene or two and tragedy strikes: cystic fibrosis, Down's syndrome, Huntington's disease. Why? How?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1993
A UC Irvine biological chemistry professor is a member of an international research team that on Wednesday won the National Medical Research Award. Prof. John Wasmuth will share the prestigious award with six other scientists. The seven make up the Huntington's Disease Collaborative Research Group. The group was honored for discovering the gene responsible for Huntington's disease. The award was presented by the National Health Council.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1988 | Compiled by staff and wire reports
The discovery of a new genetic marker "very closely linked" to Huntington's disease should improve the reliability of tests to predict the inherited, degenerative disorder, researchers said last week. Although the Huntington's gene, itself, has yet to be isolated, a study published in the British journal Nature reports the discovery of a marker that lies so close to the disease gene that the two are almost always inherited together. "It is very closely linked to the disease gene.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1993 | BILL BILLITER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
UC Irvine announced Wednesday that it has been picked as a national site for research into genes that cause certain inherited disorders and has been awarded a $3.7-million grant. The National Institutes of Health has designated UCI as the 16th National Center for Human Genome Science and Technology. John Wasmuth, a UCI professor of biological chemistry and one of the discoverers of the gene for Huntington's disease, will direct the new center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1996 | RENE TAWA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John J. Wasmuth, a UC Irvine biochemist who helped discover the genes that cause dwarfism and other diseases, has died at age 49, university officials announced Tuesday. His family requested that the cause of his death on Friday be withheld, said UCI spokeswoman Susan Menning. Wasmuth, who was raised in a small Illinois farming community, became one of the world's most prominent genetic researchers. For more than a decade, he worked to discover genetic defects and the tests to diagnose them.
NEWS
January 12, 1989 | PAMELA MARIN, Pamela Marin is a regular contributor to Orange County Life
"To good genes," toasted John Wasmuth, Ph.D., as he lifted a glass of wine at dinner Tuesday in UC Irvine's University Club. Unbeknown to Wasmuth, a genetic researcher and professor of biochemistry, the highlight of the evening would be when he stepped up to the podium to accept the Research Associates' annual achievement award--a Baccarat vase and $5,500 grant to further his work in molecular genetics. At the time of his toast, the good doctor was still in the dark.
NEWS
January 31, 1993 | JOHN NEEDHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Inside the cells are the chromosomes, and inside the chromosomes are the genes and inside the genes are the problems. Sometimes you can miss one, nick another and nothing happens. But sometimes you break one gene or two and tragedy strikes: cystic fibrosis, Down's syndrome, Huntington's disease. Why? How?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1994 | RUSS LOAR
This Labor Day weekend, UC Irvine researcher Luis Villarreal will be keeping a close eye on the tote board at the annual muscular dystrophy telethon. His three-year, $342,000 research grant is contingent on the telethon's success. "I get the feeling that people are kind of tired of hearing about this telethon," said Villarreal, one of a handful of researchers worldwide working on a genetic cure for the disease that affects more than 1 million young Americans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1995 | ALICIA DI RADO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
UC Irvine's burgeoning neuroscience programs have received another boost: a $1-million grant to fund joint research in neurobiology among scientists of different disciplines, officials said Monday. Scientists see the grant from the Lucille P. Markey Charitable Trust as a seed to start a grand initiative: the gathering of 14 of UCI's most illustrious minds and young academic talent to explore new ways to diagnose and treat diseases of the nervous system.
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