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John Waters

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NEWS
June 30, 2005 | Mark Sachs
Since his notorious 1972 breakthrough film, "Pink Flamingos," director John Waters has exhibited a dogged determination to outrage. Whether it's his casting sensibilities (Waters regulars include Patty Hearst and ex-teen porn queen Traci Lords) or his production experiments (1981's "Polyester" was released in Odorama, complete with scratch-and-sniff cards for the audience), Waters always seems to choose the path not only less traveled but off the map altogether.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2014 | By Deborah Vankin
Art talks typically don't draw stadium concert-like crowds. On Monday night, however, almost 2,000 people crowded into downtown L.A.'s Orpheum Theatre to hear filmmaker-actor-artist John Waters interview contemporary artist Jeff Koons. The event was part of the Broad museum's “Un-Private Collection” lecture series, which pairs artists from the Broad's collection with pop cultural figures. The Pope of Trash in conversation with the King of Kitsch is undoubtedly a hot ticket.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2014 | By Deborah Vankin
What can we expect when the "Pope of Trash" meets the "King of Kitsch"? John Waters, iconoclastic filmmaker, actor, artist and, yes, Pope of Trash, takes the stage at downtown Los Angeles' Orpheum Theater on Monday night to interview contemporary artist Jeff Koons. "The Un-Private Collection," the art-focused lecture series organized by the Broad museum under construction in downtown Los Angeles, on Monday will stage its largest event to date: a conversation between Waters and Koons, who will discuss his work in the Broad collection.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2014 | By Deborah Vankin
What can we expect when the "Pope of Trash" meets the "King of Kitsch"? John Waters, iconoclastic filmmaker, actor, artist and, yes, Pope of Trash, takes the stage at downtown Los Angeles' Orpheum Theater on Monday night to interview contemporary artist Jeff Koons. "The Un-Private Collection," the art-focused lecture series organized by the Broad museum under construction in downtown Los Angeles, on Monday will stage its largest event to date: a conversation between Waters and Koons, who will discuss his work in the Broad collection.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2011
EVENTS Conejo Valley Days Saddle up and mosey on down for this five-day community celebration, now in its 55th year. The festival features carnival rides, live entertainment, refreshments, games, a western-themed Main Street with a variety of vendors. Conejo Creek South, 1300 E. Janss Road, Thousand Oaks. 5-10 p.m. Wed.-Thu., 5 p.m.-midnight Fri., noon-midnight Sat., noon-6 p.m. Sun. Adult $8, children $5. (805) 495-6471. conejovalleydays.org Feisal Abdul Rauf As the imam of Masjid al-Farah mosque in Manhattan and the chairman of the Cordoba Initiative, Feisal Abdul Rauf works to improve relations between Islamic and Western communities.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2011
MOVIES John Waters : This Filthy World Goes Hollywood Baltimore's favorite rotten renaissance man ? whose film "Hairspray" was recently turned into a Tony Award-winning musical ? provides real-time commentary for a screening of his cult classic "A Dirty Shame," starring Tracey Ullman and Johnny Knoxville. Modern-rock recording artist Elvis Perkins opens the show with a solo set, and actor Matthew Gray Gubler serves as the evening's emcee. Royce Hall , 405 Hilgard Ave., UCLA.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2014 | By Deborah Vankin
Art talks typically don't draw stadium concert-like crowds. On Monday night, however, almost 2,000 people crowded into downtown L.A.'s Orpheum Theatre to hear filmmaker-actor-artist John Waters interview contemporary artist Jeff Koons. The event was part of the Broad museum's “Un-Private Collection” lecture series, which pairs artists from the Broad's collection with pop cultural figures. The Pope of Trash in conversation with the King of Kitsch is undoubtedly a hot ticket.
MAGAZINE
June 3, 1990
I enjoyed the article on John Waters ("Still Waters," by Margy Rochlin, April 8). While it was rather informative, I was puzzled that there was no mention of the fact that he's gay. I'm not exactly "outing" him when you notice that he is the cover story of "The Advocate" (the national gay news magazine--April 24), which also emblazons on its cover "Director John Waters Discusses Life After Divine, Going Hollywood, and Being Gay." Why do I make so much of this? Because the usual story about gay people in the news is one of the following: the horrors of fag-bashing, the horrors of AIDS, the horrors of a peaceful demonstration turned ugly by insensitive police (my slant on the latter)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2010 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Is John Waters a victim of his own popularity? The pencil-mustached favorite son of Baltimore started out as a purveyor of the outrageous; his greatest star, the 300-pound transvestite Divine, once ate dog feces on screen. (No, it wasn't a special effect.) But Waters' gleeful tastelessness has been softened by mainstream acceptance, beginning with his 1988 film "Hairspray," which became a modest breakthrough hit. The story of a hefty girl who integrates an early 1960s TV dance show, it was eventually turned into a Broadway show that won eight Tony Awards, including best musical — and then was remade as a big-budget film.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2012 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Though different people may know him in different guises — filmmaker, writer, artist, performer, personality, originator of the unlikely movie-to-musical-to-movie franchise of "Hairspray" — there really is only one John Waters. Emerging from his hometown of Baltimore during the cultural confusion of the late 1960s-early 1970s, Waters developed his aesthetic at the intersection of underground films, foreign art cinema and exploitation movies, creating pictures that were sharp, startling, playful, disturbing and undeniably singular.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2013
Before the idea of independent cinema arose, there were underground films, cultivating a taste for the out-there, the unusual and a hunger to push the boundaries of shock culture. It is in that tradition that filmmaker Jon Moritsugu has been working for about 25 years. His first feature film in more than a decade, "Pig Death Machine," feels like a purposefully retro throwback, shot on digital video - but frequently shifting between images distorted to look lo-fi trashy - and colors given a crisp, acid-burn pop. The film is co-written by Moritsugu's usual star (and wife)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2012 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Though different people may know him in different guises — filmmaker, writer, artist, performer, personality, originator of the unlikely movie-to-musical-to-movie franchise of "Hairspray" — there really is only one John Waters. Emerging from his hometown of Baltimore during the cultural confusion of the late 1960s-early 1970s, Waters developed his aesthetic at the intersection of underground films, foreign art cinema and exploitation movies, creating pictures that were sharp, startling, playful, disturbing and undeniably singular.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2012 | Ed Stockly
CBS This Morning Neil Patrick Harris. (N) 7 a.m. KCBS Today Andy Samberg; Chris Brown; Jane Fonda. (N) 7 a.m. KNBC KTLA Morning New s (N) 7 a.m. KTLA Good Morning America Counting Crows perform; Mike Mills, John Currence and Elizabeth Karmel. (N) 7 a.m. KABC Live With Kelly Andy Samberg; Chris Rock; Patrick Duffy; Marilu Henner. 9 a.m. KABC The View Michael Fassbender; Jacqueline Laurita; Teresa Giudice; Melissa Gorga; Kathy Wakile; Caroline Manzo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
George Kuchar was perhaps the most prolific and influential filmmaker most moviegoers have never heard of. With his twin brother, Mike — and later, alone — Kuchar made some of the earliest films in the 1960s explosion of underground movies. He often sent up the B-movies of his youth in irreverent parodies with equally campy titles. In the mid-1960s, Kuchar followed "Corruption of the Damned" with a work that came to be regarded as a classic of the alternative scene, " Hold Me While I'm Naked.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2011
EVENTS Conejo Valley Days Saddle up and mosey on down for this five-day community celebration, now in its 55th year. The festival features carnival rides, live entertainment, refreshments, games, a western-themed Main Street with a variety of vendors. Conejo Creek South, 1300 E. Janss Road, Thousand Oaks. 5-10 p.m. Wed.-Thu., 5 p.m.-midnight Fri., noon-midnight Sat., noon-6 p.m. Sun. Adult $8, children $5. (805) 495-6471. conejovalleydays.org Feisal Abdul Rauf As the imam of Masjid al-Farah mosque in Manhattan and the chairman of the Cordoba Initiative, Feisal Abdul Rauf works to improve relations between Islamic and Western communities.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2011
MOVIES John Waters : This Filthy World Goes Hollywood Baltimore's favorite rotten renaissance man ? whose film "Hairspray" was recently turned into a Tony Award-winning musical ? provides real-time commentary for a screening of his cult classic "A Dirty Shame," starring Tracey Ullman and Johnny Knoxville. Modern-rock recording artist Elvis Perkins opens the show with a solo set, and actor Matthew Gray Gubler serves as the evening's emcee. Royce Hall , 405 Hilgard Ave., UCLA.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1998 | Steve Hochman
In John Waters' 13th film, "Pecker," Edward Furlong--co-starring with Christina Ricci, Lili Taylor and Martha Plimpton--plays an amateur photographer who photographs residents in his Baltimore neighborhood and innocently turns them into art sensations. Sound like Waters himself? Yup, except Waters, 52, denies any innocence in making the cult faves "Pink Flamingos," "Hairspray" and "Cry Baby." SENTIMENTAL FOOL: "It does make some people mad that I made a nice movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2009 | Elina Shatkin
It's not easy to live down a nickname like "The Pope of Trash," especially when it was bestowed on you by William S. Burroughs, so John Waters is living up to it instead. For the last 40 years, he has been gleefully producing some of the weirdest, gutter-dredging films in American cinema, such as "Mondo Trasho," "Pink Flamingos," "Female Trouble" and "Desperate Living," peopled by bodacious drag queens and margin-dwellers and marked by outlandish plots and fantastic musical numbers.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2010
Role Models John Waters Farrar, Straus and Giroux: 304 pp., $25
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2010 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Is John Waters a victim of his own popularity? The pencil-mustached favorite son of Baltimore started out as a purveyor of the outrageous; his greatest star, the 300-pound transvestite Divine, once ate dog feces on screen. (No, it wasn't a special effect.) But Waters' gleeful tastelessness has been softened by mainstream acceptance, beginning with his 1988 film "Hairspray," which became a modest breakthrough hit. The story of a hefty girl who integrates an early 1960s TV dance show, it was eventually turned into a Broadway show that won eight Tony Awards, including best musical — and then was remade as a big-budget film.
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