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John Watson

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2014 | Robert Lloyd
It has been two years, in both real and fictional time, since Sherlock Holmes, as re-conceived by Steven Moffat and Mark Gatiss for the BBC series "Sherlock," stepped off a roof to fall apparently to his death. The three-adventure third season, with Holmes very much alive (we knew this already, spoiler spotters, and anyway, he'd have to be), begins Sunday on PBS. Some things have happened in the interim, the most important of them, perhaps, not to the characters but to the actors who play them.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2014 | By Scott Collins, This post has been corrected. See note at end for details.
Hang on to your deerstalker cap: Sherlock Holmes is not dead. This news may come as a shock to some, not least to John Watson, the doctor played by Martin Freeman in "Sherlock," the BBC's contemporary adaptation of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's famous detective stories. The critically acclaimed show, with Benedict Cumberbatch as the title detective, returns to PBS on Sunday. The new season picks up two years after the last one left off, with Holmes having faked his own death by supposedly leaping from St. Bartholomew's Hospital.
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SPORTS
January 6, 1998 | ROB FERNAS
John Watson, faculty representative to the NCAA for Pepperdine, has been selected the school's athletic director. He succeeds Wayne Wright, who retired Dec. 31 after 21 years. Watson, 49, is teaching in Pepperdine's International Studies program in London and will assume his new duties May 1. A Pepperdine graduate, he is a tenured professor of education and a former vice president for student affairs at the Malibu school.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2014 | Robert Lloyd
It has been two years, in both real and fictional time, since Sherlock Holmes, as re-conceived by Steven Moffat and Mark Gatiss for the BBC series "Sherlock," stepped off a roof to fall apparently to his death. The three-adventure third season, with Holmes very much alive (we knew this already, spoiler spotters, and anyway, he'd have to be), begins Sunday on PBS. Some things have happened in the interim, the most important of them, perhaps, not to the characters but to the actors who play them.
MAGAZINE
March 25, 2001
In the Q&A with Vietnam War author A.J. Langguth, he says that he saw the body of a "VC kid who clearly was no ideologue . . . he was somebody who resented the presence of Westerners" in his country ("Both Sides Now," by Ann Herold, Feb. 18). I disagree that that is the reason he died. He died because his superiors gave him a mission to carry out. Most American soldiers were not ideologues either, and they fought and died for the same reason he did. John Watson Los Angeles
BUSINESS
June 11, 2013 | By Shan Li
The chief executive of oil giant Chevron Corp. says that oil and gas producers must regulate themselves more tightly over hydraulic fracturing to address "legitimate concerns" that the practice is unsafe and harmful to the environment. At an event for the Center for Strategic and International Studies, John Watson said the energy industry must work harder to police itself as the public learns more about so-called fracking, the controversial technique that involves injecting large volumes of chemically laced water and sand deep into the ground to release oil or gas. "There are some risks out there.
BUSINESS
May 27, 2010 | Reuters
Discussions of safety were prominent at Chevron Corp's annual shareholder meeting in Houston on Wednesday as a blown-out BP well continued to spew oil into the Gulf of Mexico. John Watson, who took over as chief executive and chairman of the second-largest U.S. oil company this year, highlighted Chevron's improving safety record in an industry that he said could never completely eliminate risk. "But we can mitigate risk," Watson told the meeting as he discussed last month's explosion on a BP-operated offshore rig that led to the spill.
SPORTS
November 13, 1997 | GARY KLEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tobias Farris could hardly believe his eyes. As Farris and others trying out for the Los Angeles High football team huffed and puffed through conditioning drills in preparation for the 1996 season, Coach John Watson barked encouragement while matching his players push-up for push-up, sit-up for sit-up and sprint for sprint. "I was shocked," said Farris, now a senior defensive end. "I was like, 'How old is this guy?'
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2014 | By Scott Collins, This post has been corrected. See note at end for details.
Hang on to your deerstalker cap: Sherlock Holmes is not dead. This news may come as a shock to some, not least to John Watson, the doctor played by Martin Freeman in "Sherlock," the BBC's contemporary adaptation of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's famous detective stories. The critically acclaimed show, with Benedict Cumberbatch as the title detective, returns to PBS on Sunday. The new season picks up two years after the last one left off, with Holmes having faked his own death by supposedly leaping from St. Bartholomew's Hospital.
SPORTS
December 10, 2002 | Rob Fernas, Times Staff Writer
Will Kimble says he's praying for a miracle, and that's what it might take for the Pepperdine junior to play college basketball again. Kimble was the starting center for the Waves until he passed out at practice Nov. 26 and was diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, a heart condition that can cause sudden death. Kimble and his family are hoping the diagnosis was incorrect and have scheduled an evaluation by another cardiologist this week.
BUSINESS
June 11, 2013 | By Shan Li
The chief executive of oil giant Chevron Corp. says that oil and gas producers must regulate themselves more tightly over hydraulic fracturing to address "legitimate concerns" that the practice is unsafe and harmful to the environment. At an event for the Center for Strategic and International Studies, John Watson said the energy industry must work harder to police itself as the public learns more about so-called fracking, the controversial technique that involves injecting large volumes of chemically laced water and sand deep into the ground to release oil or gas. "There are some risks out there.
BUSINESS
May 27, 2010 | Reuters
Discussions of safety were prominent at Chevron Corp's annual shareholder meeting in Houston on Wednesday as a blown-out BP well continued to spew oil into the Gulf of Mexico. John Watson, who took over as chief executive and chairman of the second-largest U.S. oil company this year, highlighted Chevron's improving safety record in an industry that he said could never completely eliminate risk. "But we can mitigate risk," Watson told the meeting as he discussed last month's explosion on a BP-operated offshore rig that led to the spill.
BUSINESS
January 30, 2010 | By Ronald D. White
Chevron Corp., the nation's No. 2 oil company, said Friday that its fourth-quarter net income fell by more than a third compared with a year earlier. The decline was driven almost entirely by a huge reversal in the company's downstream segment, including its refineries, which swung from a fourth-quarter profit of more than $2 billion in 2008to a loss of more than $600 million in 2009. If not for the refining, marketing and transportation segment, Chevron would have posted a gain in net income of about $800 million compared with the same quarter in 2008.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2004 | Joel Rubin, Times Staff Writer
Three former tenants on Tuesday sued an Orange County judge who was their landlord, alleging that he refused to make repairs to the property and used his judicial clout to intimidate them. In their legal complaint, Leticia Banuelos and a couple, Michael and Susan DeGrazio, accuse Superior Court Judge John M. Watson of renting them dilapidated units in his La Habra condominium building and then ignoring their repeated pleas for repairs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2004 | Claire Luna, Times Staff Writer
An Orange County woman has complained to the state Commission on Judicial Performance that Orange County Judge John M. Watson manages his home-rental business out of his courtroom, using court personnel and resources in the process. Leticia Banuelos and other tenants say Watson used his judicial clout to bully them, communicating on court stationery and sending his clerk to check on the properties. "His whole judge-intimidation thing works," said Banuelos, a former tenant of Watson.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 2004 | David Reyes, Times Staff Writer
Agenda item No. 21 before the assessment appeals board Wednesday had John M. Watson's name and a small notation that his property was secured. There was nothing to explain the irony that it was Watson, aka Orange County Superior Court Judge John Watson, who declared the county's property assessment method unconstitutional under Proposition 13. But Watson's visit before the board was personal.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 1990 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For John G. Watson, his semi-autobiographical, one-person radio drama, "1965," is a painful but therapeutic attempt to come to grips with the traumas of his childhood and the turmoil that marked his life as a gay teen-ager during the beginnings of the hippie era. But for KPFK-FM (90.7), "1965" represents something more--a controversial program about a sexual issue that could get the station into more hot water with the Federal Communications Commission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 2004 | David Reyes, Times Staff Writer
Agenda item No. 21 before the assessment appeals board Wednesday had John M. Watson's name and a small notation that his property was secured. There was nothing to explain the irony that it was Watson, aka Orange County Superior Court Judge John Watson, who declared the county's property assessment method unconstitutional under Proposition 13. But Watson's visit before the board was personal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2003 | Jean O. Pasco, Times Staff Writer
The Orange County judge who two years ago ruled that a property tax assessment practice used throughout California violated the state Constitution is appealing his own tax bill on a La Habra condominium. Superior Court Judge John M. Watson wants to know why his property's estimated market value rose 41% in one year, resulting in an 18.6% increase in his bill. A hearing before an assessment appeals board has been scheduled for Jan. 28.
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