Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJohn Wayne Cancer Clinic
IN THE NEWS

John Wayne Cancer Clinic

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1999
Thank you for "Should She Take Tamoxifen?" (Feb. 6). Anya Booker's story touched me deeply. I was 32 years old when I was diagnosed with breast cancer. I was a new mother who became afraid to hold her son. I was the wife who feared intimacy. Taking in a deep breath, I embraced the fact that I would get through it all somehow, in spite of my fears. I participated for seven years in the Tamoxifen B-14 clinical trial. I hoped that the research would someday give women like Anya and others faced with their personal decisions about breast cancer another option to consider.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1999
Thank you for "Should She Take Tamoxifen?" (Feb. 6). Anya Booker's story touched me deeply. I was 32 years old when I was diagnosed with breast cancer. I was a new mother who became afraid to hold her son. I was the wife who feared intimacy. Taking in a deep breath, I embraced the fact that I would get through it all somehow, in spite of my fears. I participated for seven years in the Tamoxifen B-14 clinical trial. I hoped that the research would someday give women like Anya and others faced with their personal decisions about breast cancer another option to consider.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1989 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Times Staff Writer
Responding to a novel use of the radio airwaves, more than 10,000 people called talk-radio station KABC-AM (790) Tuesday morning volunteering to serve as subjects for an experimental cancer detection test. KABC General Manager George Green said he was stunned not only by the size but also by the immediacy of the response. "I didn't expect to get that many people that quick. . . . We got 5,000 in a half hour," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1996 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Peggy Maddox's life was saved by a movie and a cancer center named after a movie star. Maddox found a lump under her arm in the summer of 1983, a swollen lymph node characteristic of melanoma--the most deadly form of skin cancer. Surgeons near her Redondo Beach home removed the lump and pronounced her cured. By fall, she thought she had another lump, but the surgeons told her she was wrong, that she was OK.
NEWS
August 24, 1990 | JEANNINE STEIN, TIMES SOCIETY WRITER
A charity fashion show featuring chic cocktail dresses and gowns seemed the perfect place to find out what cogent comments women have about the current state of evening wear. "It's hard to find clothes within a certain price category," one woman said emphatically. "You can find them for $300 and $3,000, but that in-between price is hard to find." "I'm looking for something that when I walk into a room every one of us doesn't have on the same outfit," said another.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1996 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Peggy Maddox's life was saved by a movie and a cancer center named after a movie star. Maddox found a lump under her arm in the summer of 1983, a swollen lymph node characteristic of melanoma--the most deadly form of skin cancer. Surgeons near her Redondo Beach home removed the lump and pronounced her cured. By fall, she thought she had another lump, but the surgeons told her she was wrong, that she was OK.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1991 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Honors for Hagman: Peter Pan is on the honorary committee for the John Wayne Cancer Clinic's 1991 Odyssey Ball. It's an affectionate tribute to the late Broadway star Mary Martin, mother of the evening's honoree, Larry Hagman. Hagman will be receiving the group's Duke Award in recognition of his long support of anti-smoking campaigns and of the auxiliary. More than a dozen members of Wayne's family will be present for the event April 6.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1987 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, Times Television Critic
We've been conditioned to believe that there's no grimmer world than cancer. That is the case for many of its victims. However, the mood is refreshingly upbeat in a KHJ-TV Channel 9 documentary at 8 p.m. Sunday called "Is There Life After Cancer?" The answer is yes. Hosted by Richard Crenna, produced by Bobby Conlan and Ridge Conlan and written by co-producer Ed Parker, the hourlong program is a recital of success stories from cancer victims now living relatively normal lives.
NEWS
August 24, 1990 | JEANNINE STEIN, TIMES SOCIETY WRITER
A charity fashion show featuring chic cocktail dresses and gowns seemed the perfect place to find out what cogent comments women have about the current state of evening wear. "It's hard to find clothes within a certain price category," one woman said emphatically. "You can find them for $300 and $3,000, but that in-between price is hard to find." "I'm looking for something that when I walk into a room every one of us doesn't have on the same outfit," said another.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1989 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Times Staff Writer
Responding to a novel use of the radio airwaves, more than 10,000 people called talk-radio station KABC-AM (790) Tuesday morning volunteering to serve as subjects for an experimental cancer detection test. KABC General Manager George Green said he was stunned not only by the size but also by the immediacy of the response. "I didn't expect to get that many people that quick. . . . We got 5,000 in a half hour," he said.
NEWS
January 3, 1990
A funeral service is scheduled today at 2 p.m. at Mountain View Chapel in Altadena for Gweneth Margaret Howarth Feynman, a free-lance landscape designer, singer and widow of Nobel Prize-winning physicist Richard Feynman. Mrs. Feynman died Sunday of cancer at UCLA Medical Center, said Frances Lewine, a cousin. She was 55 and traveling in Egypt when her final illness began. Earlier she had been in the Antarctica, the last of the world's continents she had not visited. Mrs.
NEWS
August 8, 1985 | SUE AVERY, Times Staff Writer
Charles Mitchell, who served as police chief here from 1974 until his retirement last month because of poor health, has died of cancer. He was 53. Mitchell began his service with the Arcadia Police Department as a patrolman in 1964. He later became a motorcycle officer and was promoted to sergeant in 1968. He worked as a sergeant until 1974 when the police chief position opened up. He was among 40 candidates for the job and was promoted over four lieutenants and three captains in the department.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|