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John Wayne Gacy

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1994
The article on John Wayne Gacy (March 22) points out clearly what is wrong with our justice and prison systems. Although Gacy has been convicted of the worst series of murders in U.S. history and sentenced to death, he has been housed at taxpayer expense for 14 years. And what punishment has occurred? He arises at 10 a.m., gets 100 fan letters a week, paints and plays games. He is now considering which tabloid to be interviewed by. Where is the justice in that? If he wants to paint clowns, let him make toys for disabled children!
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 29, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
Michele Bachmann isn't going to run for reelection. Plenty of folks are happy about that. I'm one of them. But it's not personal. It's practical. True, Minnesota's Republican representative and one-time GOP presidential contender doesn't get much love from the left. Heck, she doesn't get much love from the middle either. And a quick glance at the comments on stories about her reveal a certain, shall we say, unkindness and lack of respect. But pundits and others adore her because she's always good for a gaffe . Like this one, while campaigning for the Republican presidential nomination in South Carolina on Aug. 16, 2011: “Before we get started, let's all say 'Happy Birthday' to Elvis Presley today.
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NEWS
May 10, 1992 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Wayne Gacy was a well-respected member of the Chicago community who owned and operated his own construction company. But he had a heinous secret life. He would lure young boys, often his own employees, to his house, force them to perform sexual acts and then murder them. He would often sleep with the dead body of some of his victims for one to two days before disposing of it. On Dec. 22, 1978, Gacy was arrested and later charged with the murders of 33 teen-age boys.
NATIONAL
March 25, 2012 | By Robin Abcarian, Los Angeles Times
Texas Gov. Rick Perry had his "oops" moment on a Michigan debate stage. Rep. Michele Bachmann (R-Minn.) mixed up actor John Wayne with serial killer John Wayne Gacy. And Herman Cain referred to "Ubeki-beki-beki-stan-stan. " The 2012 Republican presidential campaign has provided a bounty of infelicitous phrasings, wrongheaded assertions and embarrassing gaffes. There was Perry's memory lapse on the debate stage, which came to be known as his "oops moment. " There was Bachmann in Waterloo, Iowa, trumpeting her pride at hailing from the same hometown as John Wayne, only to learn that her homie was serial killer John Wayne Gacy.
NEWS
March 22, 1994 | STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Wayne Gacy's days repeat themselves, one after another, in the sort of well-ordered, stress-free routine that a maximum security prison can provide: Three square meals. Free time to correspond with pen pals. A regular pinochle game with fellow prisoners. And, when the spirit moves him, long hours devoted to painting. It is an existence Gacy has grown accustomed to after 14 years spent on Death Row at Menard Correctional Institute in southern Illinois.
BOOKS
April 7, 1991
No wonder reviewer Henry Bean applauded Bret Easton Ellis' "American Psycho": Bean wrote the screenplay for "Internal Affairs," perhaps one of the most misogynistic and offensive films to come out of Hollywood in years. It's like having John Wayne Gacy review Charles Manson's autobiography. LARRY MATHEWS LOS ANGELES
NEWS
October 27, 1988 | From Associated Press
Convicted multiple killer John Wayne Gacy has complained to Illinois Republican officials about a campaign leaflet that said he would be eligible for weekend passes had he committed his crimes in Massachusetts. In a letter received Monday at state Republican headquarters, Gacy criticized the GOP for "exploiting the name of John Wayne Gacy in order to scare people into voting for George Bush."
NEWS
May 8, 1994 | Howard Rosenberg
Doubtlessly repeated to coincide with the scheduled execution of serial killer John Wayne Gacy, this 1991 Canadian production offers a cop's-eye view, with Jud Kinberg's script telling the chilling Gacy story from the perspective of Joe Kozenczak (Michael Riley), a policeman in the Chicago suburb of Des Plaines, where Gacy murdered a record 33 individuals, all young males whom he imprisoned and sexually assaulted.
NEWS
September 30, 1988 | Associated Press
The Illinois Supreme Court on Thursday upheld the convictions and death sentence of John Wayne Gacy in the sex-related killings of 33 young men and boys. The court set a Jan. 11, 1989, execution date, but that is almost certain to be delayed by further appeals. The ruling was the second time the court has turned down an appeal by Gacy, 46, who was convicted on March 12, 1980.
NEWS
May 2, 1989
A federal judge ruled the Illinois death penalty violates a defendant's right to a fair trial and declared the law unconstitutional. U.S. District Judge Harold Baker vacated the death penalty against Charles Silagy, who is on Death Row at the Pontiac Correctional Center for the fatal 1980 stabbings of Cheryl Block, 32, and her roommate, Ann Waters, 29, of Danville. The ruling put in question the futures of the state's 121 Death Row inmates, including John Wayne Gacy, who was convicted of killing 33 young men and boys.
NATIONAL
October 23, 2011 | By Seema Mehta, Los Angeles Times
Michele Bachmann was laying out a tough immigration policy recently when she veered off script to make a point that she said underscored the national security implications of a porous border. "Fifty-nine thousand this year came across the border, as was said in the introduction, from Yemen, from Syria. These are nations that are state sponsors of terror," the Minnesota congresswoman and Republican presidential candidate said, citing a report she had heard. "They're coming into our country!"
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2011 | James Rainey
Michele Bachmann botched Elvis' birth date (oops, she singled out the day the King died) this week, after previously confusing the birthplace of a movie icon (John Wayne) with that of a serial killer (John Wayne Gacy). And the news played big, on the Web and cable TV. Significantly less play went to a few other morsels that turned up: The Minnesota congresswoman has lauded an evangelical thinker who speculated the U.S. might control citizens with psychotropic drugs. And she once gave a "Must Read" rating to a historical biography that said slaves and masters in the Old South lived in a state of "mutual esteem," "unity and companionship.
NEWS
June 28, 2011 | By James Oliphant, Washington Bureau
On a day that was intended to showcase her viability as a top-tier presidential candidate, Michele Bachmann spent Monday evening defending her veracity and explaining a gaffe that seemingly had her mixing up American icon John Wayne with a notorious serial killer. Bachmann found a friendly place to deliver her side of the story: Sean Hannity’s show on Fox News Channel. It became the forum where Bachmann and the news channel patched things up after a brief tiff spurred by Fox newsman Chris Wallace's asking Bachmann last weekend if she was a “flake.” Wallace was pushing Bachmann about whether she stretches the truth, an issue that has begun to trail the Minnesota conservative as even she has showed steady improvement in the polls.
NEWS
June 27, 2011 | By James Oliphant
Mixing up an American screen legend with a serial killer -- just another day on the campaign trail, right? Michele Bachmann delivered her presidential announcement in Waterloo, Iowa, Monday because she was born there, but she inadvertently ended up reminding residents of a dark chapter in their town’s history. In an interview with Fox News Channel, Bachmann, the Minnesota conservative, pointed out that John Wayne, the actor, was from Waterloo. “That’s the kind of spirit I have, too,” Bachmann said.
NEWS
May 23, 2004 | Sharon Cohen, Associated Press Writer
The television cast an eerie glow in the dingy motel room but the doctor wasn't watching. She was waiting impatiently for an important call -- one that would tell her that the killer was dead. About 3 a.m., word came: John Wayne Gacy, the serial killer who prowled Chicago streets preying on lonely runaways and murdered 33 young men and boys, had been executed. Dr. Helen Morrison headed to a nearby hospital, where she donned scrubs and Latex gloves to assist in Gacy's autopsy.
NEWS
November 24, 1998 | Reuters
Police dug up a small plot of ground behind an apartment building Monday but failed to find any evidence that executed serial killer John Wayne Gacy had used it for a graveyard during a murder spree that ended 20 years ago. Police Commander John Thomas said two holes--dug after ground-penetrating radar indicated there might be something unusual--found only such items as a marble, a flattened sauce pan, wire and roots.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1994
The execution of John Wayne Gacy (May 10) was a sad spectacle. People marched the streets of Chicago demanding Gacy's execution, a prosecutor declared that it would be "a privilege to see him draw his last breath," and law enforcement officers threw a party to celebrate the extinguishment of life. These people have succumbed to hatred, becoming killers just like Gacy. Gandhi said that "an eye for an eye makes us all blind." We need to open our eyes and see that state-sanctioned killing cheapens the value of life for all of us. ROBERT M. MYERS Sherman Oaks What a strange world we live in!
NEWS
November 24, 1998 | Reuters
Police dug up a small plot of ground behind an apartment building Monday but failed to find any evidence that executed serial killer John Wayne Gacy had used it for a graveyard during a murder spree that ended 20 years ago. Police Commander John Thomas said two holes--dug after ground-penetrating radar indicated there might be something unusual--found only such items as a marble, a flattened sauce pan, wire and roots.
NEWS
July 6, 1997 | PAUL DEAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Born several decades too late, Robert Ressler was cheated of poking into the motivation and miens of Jack the Ripper, Dracula, the Vampire of Dusseldorf, Gorilla Man and other pioneers of murder by the dozen. So ex-FBI agent and contemporary criminologist Ressler has settled for studying the less storied, never nicknamed, equally bloodthirsty and thoroughly modern monsters John Wayne Gacy, Jeffrey Dahmer and peers who have struck back at society from Wimbledon Common to the Tokyo subway.
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