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ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2001 | PATRICK PACHECO, Patrick Pacheco is a regular contributor to Calendar
In "Contact," protagonist Michael Wiley is a guy with two left feet. But the suicidal advertising executive finally makes the right move: He steps into a dance hall and trips all over himself. In this dreamscape--the last in the triptych of short stories that make up the show--emotional fulfillment comes only when one is prepared to assay uncertain territory.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2002 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS
On the ground floor of his plush, five-story Turtle Bay townhouse, next door to one owned by Katharine Hepburn, Stephen Sondheim relaxes on his couch, with a drink, in his slippers. He is talking at the moment about "uplift songs," a subcategory of show tune for which he is not best known.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2001
Among the problems plaguing contemporary musical theater, there are the deconstructionists--Stephen Sondheim and John Weidman at the forefront--who disdain linear narrative ("At Ease on New Ground," by Patrick Pacheco, July 8). Some of their challenging works--virtual sung essays--may deserve and eventually find wider audiences. It hardly takes a "Broadway purist," however, to realize that the well-danced "Contact" is hardly a musical at all but ultimately a rather cold, clinical work of ballet wrapped seductively around an acerbic one-act play.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2002 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Composer Stephen Sondheim and librettist John Weidman have reached a settlement with movie and stage producer Scott Rudin over rights to the musical "Gold!" Rudin and several others invested in a 1999 workshop of Sondheim and Weidman's musical, then called "Wise Guys." After it was poorly received, plans for the show were dropped until Sondheim and Weidman decided to revive it for a production at the Goodman Theatre in Chicago this fall.
BOOKS
August 27, 1995 | ALLAN M. JALON
Who doesn't want to know more about their parents' lives? Or despair when the quest seems futile? Writers' children-- some writers' children--can study their parents in the light they shine on themselves. Consider John Weidman. His father, Jerome Weidman, wrote a famous story about the struggle to enter a parent's mind. The young narrator of "My Father Sits in the Dark"--which will be read at 6 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2002 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Composer Stephen Sondheim and librettist John Weidman have reached a settlement with movie and stage producer Scott Rudin over rights to the musical "Gold!" Rudin and several others invested in a 1999 workshop of Sondheim and Weidman's musical, then called "Wise Guys." After it was poorly received, plans for the show were dropped until Sondheim and Weidman decided to revive it for a production at the Goodman Theatre in Chicago this fall.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 1996 | TODD EVERETT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Assassins" is a dark comedy--too dark, evidently, for many spectators, judging from its limited 1991 off-Broadway run. Many viewers, though, will find the show--now playing weekend matinees at the Conejo Players Theater--very funny, indeed. Each of the central characters has at least attempted to assassinate an American president.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2002 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS
On the ground floor of his plush, five-story Turtle Bay townhouse, next door to one owned by Katharine Hepburn, Stephen Sondheim relaxes on his couch, with a drink, in his slippers. He is talking at the moment about "uplift songs," a subcategory of show tune for which he is not best known.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1994 | Jan Breslauer, Times staff writer
Stephen Sondheim may be the composer most likely to succeed--with the least likely of topics. From the overzealous slice-n-shaver of "Sweeney Todd" to the depressive-obsessive heroine of his current hit, "Passion," he has found songs in the hearts of the schmucky and the sickly. And that's also true with "Assassins," a less familiar 1991 effort getting its local professional premiere at the Los Angeles Theatre Center.
NEWS
May 30, 2002
* Assassins (Knightsbridge Theatre Los Angeles, 1944 Riverside Drive, L.A., [626] 440-0821). Jeffrey Cabot Myers, above, plays a would-be airplane hijacker in the controversial and rarely seen Stephen Sondheim/John Weidman musical about nine killers and would-be assassins of U.S. presidents. The production raises disturbing questions about the dark side of the American dream. Sat., 5 p.m.; Sun., 6 p.m. Ends June 16. $22.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2001
Among the problems plaguing contemporary musical theater, there are the deconstructionists--Stephen Sondheim and John Weidman at the forefront--who disdain linear narrative ("At Ease on New Ground," by Patrick Pacheco, July 8). Some of their challenging works--virtual sung essays--may deserve and eventually find wider audiences. It hardly takes a "Broadway purist," however, to realize that the well-danced "Contact" is hardly a musical at all but ultimately a rather cold, clinical work of ballet wrapped seductively around an acerbic one-act play.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2001 | PATRICK PACHECO, Patrick Pacheco is a regular contributor to Calendar
In "Contact," protagonist Michael Wiley is a guy with two left feet. But the suicidal advertising executive finally makes the right move: He steps into a dance hall and trips all over himself. In this dreamscape--the last in the triptych of short stories that make up the show--emotional fulfillment comes only when one is prepared to assay uncertain territory.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 1996 | TODD EVERETT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Assassins" is a dark comedy--too dark, evidently, for many spectators, judging from its limited 1991 off-Broadway run. Many viewers, though, will find the show--now playing weekend matinees at the Conejo Players Theater--very funny, indeed. Each of the central characters has at least attempted to assassinate an American president.
BOOKS
August 27, 1995 | ALLAN M. JALON
Who doesn't want to know more about their parents' lives? Or despair when the quest seems futile? Writers' children-- some writers' children--can study their parents in the light they shine on themselves. Consider John Weidman. His father, Jerome Weidman, wrote a famous story about the struggle to enter a parent's mind. The young narrator of "My Father Sits in the Dark"--which will be read at 6 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1994 | Jan Breslauer, Times staff writer
Stephen Sondheim may be the composer most likely to succeed--with the least likely of topics. From the overzealous slice-n-shaver of "Sweeney Todd" to the depressive-obsessive heroine of his current hit, "Passion," he has found songs in the hearts of the schmucky and the sickly. And that's also true with "Assassins," a less familiar 1991 effort getting its local professional premiere at the Los Angeles Theatre Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2003 | Don Shirley
"Bounce," the new musical by Stephen Sondheim and John Weidman, has stopped short of Broadway, a spokesman for producer Roger Berlind said. The musical about the colorful early 20th century Mizner brothers received discouraging reviews at the Kennedy Center in Washington, where it opened Oct. 30, and in its engagement last summer at Chicago's Goodman Theatre. A cast album was recorded earlier this month and is slated for a March release.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2008 | From the Associated Press
The Stephen Sondheim-John Weidman musical that was seen in Chicago and Washington in 2003 has a new name and will finally turn up in New York Nov. 18 -- the first new Sondheim musical done there since "Passion" in 1994. The show, formerly known as "Bounce" but now called "Road Show," will begin preview performances at the Public Theater Oct. 28. It tells the story of the Mizner brothers, Wilson and Addison, two men in search of the American dream. They will be played by Michael Cerveris and Alexander Gemignani, with Alma Cuervo as their mother.
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