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John Wiley Price

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December 2, 1990 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Wiley Price pumps iron. He drives a Lotus. He is a Dallas County commissioner. He is black. He is angry. And he is the man who has brought the simmering racial tension in this city to near-boiling. Say what you will about John Wiley Price, there is no halfway about him. He has a radical's mind and a showman's disposition, a flare for just the right quote to get him on the evening news and in the morning papers.
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NEWS
December 2, 1990 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Wiley Price pumps iron. He drives a Lotus. He is a Dallas County commissioner. He is black. He is angry. And he is the man who has brought the simmering racial tension in this city to near-boiling. Say what you will about John Wiley Price, there is no halfway about him. He has a radical's mind and a showman's disposition, a flare for just the right quote to get him on the evening news and in the morning papers.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1991 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
William Rathburn, a Los Angeles deputy chief who coordinated security measures for the 1984 Olympics and has been one of the Police Department's most successful anti-gang crime fighters, was named chief of police Friday in Dallas. His departure, after a 27-year Los Angeles Police Department career in which he was considered a potential successor to Chief Daryl F.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1989 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, Times Staff Writer
What if a movie critic went berserk? Dallas Times Herald columnist John Bloom contemplated the question in 1982, when he and a group of fellow writers made up their minds to find the elusive Unwritten Feature. Bloom's scenario went something like this: What if New York Times critic Vincent Canby ("the most boring writer in the universe" in Bloom's estimation) woke up one morning and, instead of liking "Gandhi," found himself with a new appreciation for films with less, um, lofty ambitions--such as "Dr. Butcher, M.D."
NEWS
December 12, 1999 | MATT CURRY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Nearly 10 years after Joyce Ann Brown walked out of prison, her bitter feelings over the ordeal have given way to brighter thoughts. "Man maliciously prosecuted me and put me in prison," she said recently, "but God took the opportunity to cleanse me. . . . I see myself as a better person." Brown was released from prison a decade ago thanks to a state appeals court that ruled she had been wrongly convicted in a deadly armed robbery.
NEWS
July 28, 1996 | MELISSA WILLIAMS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
They were known as the "Slam Dunk Gang"--a white-majority bloc on the Dallas school board that dictated policy for most of the last few years in a district in which 90% of the students are minorities. Although the schools improved under the "Slam Dunk Gang," the legacy has been hard feelings among blacks and racial tensions that have engulfed the school board.
NEWS
January 27, 1988 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, Times Staff Writer
John Chase was a cop giving out a traffic ticket when he died. A deranged man--significantly, a black man--pulled the pistol from the policeman's holster, terrorized him and then shot him. Dozens of people watched it happen last Saturday on a downtown city street. They watched as Chase, 25, begged for his life before being shot in the face. Then he was shot twice more. And in the initial recounting by police, there were reports of people in the crowd goading the killer, Carl D.
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