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John Wilkes Booth

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TRAVEL
March 17, 1996 | ELLEN MELINKOFF
After John Wilkes Booth assassinated Abraham Lincoln at Ford's Theater in Washington, on April 14, 1865, he spent 12 days on the run before reaching Garrett's Farm in Virginia where he either killed himself or was shot by federal troops. Those 12 days are condensed into a 12-hour John Wilkes Booth Escape Route Tour sponsored by the Surratt House Museum in Clinton, Md. Every year the first tour of the season is held on the Saturday closest to the assassination--this year it's April 13.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
July 20, 2013
Re "Rand Paul's paleo pal," Opinion, July 16 According to Jonah Goldberg, Jack Hunter - the aide to Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) who toasts John Wilkes Booth on his birthday - is just a throwback to the "paleolibertarian" movement, a pragmatic attempt to bolster support for libertarianism through kinship with white supremacists and neoconfederates. As Goldberg frames it, Hunter represents an old mistake, an attempt to connect two movements that really have nothing in common. In other words, now that the most racist examples of white resentment have become too embarrassing, conservatives want to pretend they were never a meaningful part of their movement.
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NEWS
September 15, 1985 | Associated Press
A sign on the road leading to a secluded Gothic Revival cottage points the way to the home of Junius Brutus Booth and his son Edwin, a renowned Shakespearean actor. Tourists, however, are usually more interested in Edwin's infamous brother. Now, a preservation group has drawn up ambitious plans to restore the 163-year-old home of John Wilkes Booth, the presidential assassin. Still, some prefer that the name of the man who killed Abraham Lincoln in Ford's Theater in Washington be forgotten.
OPINION
July 16, 2013 | Jonah Goldberg
Rand Paul is the most interesting contender for the Republican nomination. And when I say interesting, I mean that in the broadest sense. A case in point: Last week, the Kentucky senator hit some turbulence when the Washington Free Beacon reported that Jack Hunter, Paul's aide and the coauthor of his book, "The Tea Party Goes to Washington," was once the Southern Avenger. Who's that? Starting in the 1990s, as a radio shock jock, Hunter would wear a wrestling mask made from a Confederate flag, while making jokes about assassinating Abraham Lincoln and having the South re-secede.
BOOKS
September 20, 1992 | Stefan Kanfer, Kanfer reviews the arts regularly for Time Magazine and the New Leader
As the Civil War wound down, an actor boasted that he was about to astonish the world. "What are you going to do?" inquired his listener. "Kill Jeff Davis, take Richmond, or play Hamlet a hundred nights?" There was no reply. The performer would hardly want to murder his hero Davis, and taking Richmond was out of the question. After all, he was only one disgruntled Southerner, with a few like-minded colleagues. As for playing Hamlet a hundred nights, his brother had already done that.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1990 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Tickets Shot: There are no tickets left for the Off-Broadway run of Stephen Sondheim's new musical "Assassins." Now in previews, the show is sold out until it is set to close at New York's Playwrights Horizons on Feb. 16. Those still hoping to get into the musical about presidential killers and would-be killers, including John Wilkes Booth, Lee Harvey Oswald, John Hinkley and Sarah Jane Moore, are signing pre-performance waiting lists at the theater.
TRAVEL
April 27, 2008
Susan Spano's April 20 article "In Pursuit of Butch and Sundance" was magnificent. One inflexible rule of journalese is that American assassins must have three names: John Wilkes Booth, Lee Harvey Oswald, James Earl Ray, Mark David Chapman. This courtesy of a resonant three-part moniker is also applied to other dangerous folk. This is why the "Utah bandit" is "Robert LeRoy Parker" to many journalists and just plain "Butch Cassidy" to almost everyone else. Evan Dale Santos Adelanto, Calif.
NEWS
May 27, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A judge refused to let John Wilkes Booth's descendants dig up the family plot where Booth is supposedly buried to settle claims that he escaped Union soldiers and lived for 30 more years under the alias David E. George after he shot President Abraham Lincoln in 1865. The history books say Booth was tracked to a Virginia farm and shot in the neck as he tried to escape a burning barn.
NEWS
March 31, 1993 | Associated Press
An attempt to clear the name of Dr. Samuel Mudd, who set John Wilkes Booth's broken leg after the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln, has moved another step in the Michigan Legislature. The House Oversight and Ethics Committee on Monday sent to the full House a resolution urging President Clinton and the Army to exonerate the doctor. The Senate has already approved the measure.
OPINION
July 20, 2013
Re "Rand Paul's paleo pal," Opinion, July 16 According to Jonah Goldberg, Jack Hunter - the aide to Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) who toasts John Wilkes Booth on his birthday - is just a throwback to the "paleolibertarian" movement, a pragmatic attempt to bolster support for libertarianism through kinship with white supremacists and neoconfederates. As Goldberg frames it, Hunter represents an old mistake, an attempt to connect two movements that really have nothing in common. In other words, now that the most racist examples of white resentment have become too embarrassing, conservatives want to pretend they were never a meaningful part of their movement.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"Drunk History," which has lived on the website Funny or Die in fits and starts since 2007, graduates to television Tuesday, courtesy of Comedy Central. It is a strange business: a show in which people who have had too much to drink, for real, travel to the edge of coherence. There will be vomit. Some will find it offensive, immoral, irresponsible - a highly defensible position. It's also very funny, a thing of twisted genius and, for the next eight weeks possibly the most original comedy on television.
NATIONAL
March 14, 2012 | By Richard Fausset
Over at the Gettysburg National Military Park bookstore in Pennsylvania, they've decided that maybe it's not such a great idea to sell a bobblehead of John Wilkes Booth, the notorious Confederate sympathizer and assassin of President Abraham Lincoln. The Associated Press reports that the dolls were on sale for about a week, then pulled from the shelf after the park superintendent and other officials determined that a bobblehead of a guy who murdered one of the nation's most revered public figures was sort of inappropriate.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2012 | By David Colker
A bobblehead doll of Lincoln assassin John Wilkes Booth, complete with handgun, has been taken off the shelves of the gift shop at the Gettysburg National Military Park. The visitors center at the park, which is overseen by the National Parks Service, pulled the head-springy doll after being contacted by a reporter at the Evening Sun newspaper in Hanover, Pa., as The Times and other news outlets have reported. Still, the Booth doll is apparently a strong seller, according to the Bobblehead company, which produces the item.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2011 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
After an attack of confidence-shaking violence by political terrorists, a leading U.S. legal figure pushes for a civilian trial instead of a military tribunal for a suspect in the attack. But he is overridden by a political tide arguing against a public trial and in favor of national security. It sounds a lot like Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr.'s attempt to prosecute accused 9/11 mastermind Khalid Shaikh Mohammed in a New York federal court. In fact, it's a movie about an event that took place well more than a century ago: "The Conspirator," Robert Redford's account of the trial of accused John Wilkes Booth collaborator Mary Surratt.
TRAVEL
April 27, 2008
Susan Spano's April 20 article "In Pursuit of Butch and Sundance" was magnificent. One inflexible rule of journalese is that American assassins must have three names: John Wilkes Booth, Lee Harvey Oswald, James Earl Ray, Mark David Chapman. This courtesy of a resonant three-part moniker is also applied to other dangerous folk. This is why the "Utah bandit" is "Robert LeRoy Parker" to many journalists and just plain "Butch Cassidy" to almost everyone else. Evan Dale Santos Adelanto, Calif.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2006 | Elizabeth Snead, Special to The Times
How would you celebrate winning two Grammy awards? If you're Kelly Clarkson -- winner for best pop vocal performance and best pop vocal album -- it's simple. "With a drink in my hand!" the grinning 23-year-old said, holding up a short glass of red liquid. What kind of drink is that? "Vodka and cranberry!" And how late was she gonna go? "Until morning! I won two Grammys!" Clarkson was the lady of the night at Sony BMG's post-Grammy bash at the Hollywood Roosevelt's Tropicana pool bar.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1997
Re "McVeigh Speaks Out, Receives Death Sentence," Aug. 15: The object lesson to be gleaned from Timothy McVeigh's defiant remarks is painfully clear: In the final analysis, the cause of the Oklahoma City tragedy is traceable to the overheated rhetoric spewed by hatemongering radio talk-show demagogues, sanctimonious gun advocates, fire-eating anti-government doctrinaires and other such ersatz patriots who routinely dispense incendiary "causes" to...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2004 | Anthony Day, Special to The Times
"AWFUL EVENT" blared the headline in a leading U.S. newspaper. Indeed, the mortal wounding of President Abraham Lincoln on April 14, 1865, was one of the worst occurrences in the country's history, from its founding even to the present day. A reunited nation had just passed through four years of a "fiery trial" that took the lives of 620,000 men. The larger secessionist army had surrendered, and although some Confederate troops were still in the field, Gen. Ulysses S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1999 | TODD EVERETT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Can you picture John Wilkes Booth, the actor who shot and killed President Lincoln, as a sympathetic figure? Probably not, but Brendan Hughes makes a better case than you might imagine in "Glamorous Assassin." Hughes portrays Booth in a play he wrote and has performed in London and Los Angeles. It's the first presentation in the Ojai Theater 150 group's new series of one-actor shows that run from now until mid-July. Booth was a complicated man.
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