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John Wood

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 1993 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Jazz is my life," says pianist John Wood. It seems like it. Wood--now a 43-year-old father of two--has been leading his own bands since the tender age of 16. At a mere 17, the mainstream-based pianist made the first of 10 albums on his own L.A.P. label.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2014 | By Mikael Wood
Not long ago, Barbara and Ethan Gruska - the fresh-faced siblings at the core of L.A.'s Belle Brigade - were deep in a rehearsal with their two bandmates. The goal that afternoon was reworking the songs on the Belle Brigade's self-titled 2011 debut so that they fit alongside tunes from the group's just-finished follow-up. It took some doing. A sunny blast of retro West Coast folk-pop, "The Belle Brigade" pulled deeply (and openly) from crowd-pleasing forebears such as the Beach Boys and Fleetwood Mac. The new album, by contrast, begins with a digitally processed train whistle laid atop a booming drumbeat.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1995 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
John Wood is a 44-year-old on a mission. His goal? Nothing less than the rescue of American popular music. * Poke around his living room and you'll find plenty of evidence of his obsession. A pile of bumper stickers urges "Back To 2 Track," Woods' call to arms against record industry dependence on multitrack recording. There's a reel-to-reel tape of him playing piano at his Studio Masters Concert Space in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 2011
John Wood Award-winning British actor John Wood, 81, a British actor who won a Tony Award in 1976 for his role in the Broadway production of Tom Stoppard's "Travesties," died Saturday in his sleep inEngland, his agent announced. Best known for his theater work in London and on Broadway, Wood was nominated for two more Tonys, as Guildenstern in Stoppard's "Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead," which opened on Broadway in 1967, and as the title character in "Sherlock Holmes," a long-running revival of the 1899 drama that came to Broadway in 1974.
TRAVEL
June 19, 1994
Visitors to San Francisco's Mystery Books, mentioned in "Book Soup" (May 1), should note the store's odd hours. They are: Wednesday through Sunday, 11:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Also omitted from your article were two landmark downtown Oakland bookstores: De Lauer's Super Newsstand, 1310 Broadway, has vast offerings, including paperbacks, magazines and newspapers from around the world. The Holmes Book Co., 274 14th St., is in its 100th year and has three floors of mostly used books and some rare literature.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1993 | Leonard Feather
The Overland Cafe, on the avenue of the same name, features jazz trio music Fridays and Saturdays (there are also Sunday jazz brunches). On Saturday night, the incumbent was pianist John Wood. When jazz is offered as a virtual obligato to dinner, there are problems at times in engaging the attention of the audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 1996 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pianist John Wood has carried his crusade on behalf of American musical forms and live performance to many an unlikely venue. The 45-year-old keyboardist and founder of the Society for the Rehumanization of American Music has gathered audiences in hotel lounges, intimate recording studios and even his own living room, as well as in a number of Los Angeles clubs, in his attempt to communicate the joys of live music.
NEWS
June 19, 1994 | HILLARY JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Eleven months ago, pianist John Wood got tired. "I'd been working the clubs for years, playing on bad pianos in noisy rooms, and suddenly I just got tired," the jazz musician says. That was the beginning of the Studio Masters Concert Series, a unique phenomenon that defies categorization. Wood took over an extra room in the Studio Masters recording studio, a family business founded by his father, Randy Wood, and started taking reservations.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2014 | By Mikael Wood
Not long ago, Barbara and Ethan Gruska - the fresh-faced siblings at the core of L.A.'s Belle Brigade - were deep in a rehearsal with their two bandmates. The goal that afternoon was reworking the songs on the Belle Brigade's self-titled 2011 debut so that they fit alongside tunes from the group's just-finished follow-up. It took some doing. A sunny blast of retro West Coast folk-pop, "The Belle Brigade" pulled deeply (and openly) from crowd-pleasing forebears such as the Beach Boys and Fleetwood Mac. The new album, by contrast, begins with a digitally processed train whistle laid atop a booming drumbeat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 2011
John Wood Award-winning British actor John Wood, 81, a British actor who won a Tony Award in 1976 for his role in the Broadway production of Tom Stoppard's "Travesties," died Saturday in his sleep inEngland, his agent announced. Best known for his theater work in London and on Broadway, Wood was nominated for two more Tonys, as Guildenstern in Stoppard's "Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead," which opened on Broadway in 1967, and as the title character in "Sherlock Holmes," a long-running revival of the 1899 drama that came to Broadway in 1974.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2010
The Venice Film Festival on Friday honored Hong Kong director John Woo, one of the few Asian filmmakers to enjoy box office success in Hollywood as well as at home. Woo was awarded a lifetime achievement Golden Lion at the world's oldest film festival on the same day it showcased his latest movie, "Reign of Assassins," which he co-directed with Su Chao-Pin and also produced. Woo, 64, has directed more than 26 films in nearly 30 years, beginning his career in Hong Kong in the 1970s before moving to Hollywood in the 1990s.
BOOKS
August 14, 2005 | Merle Rubin, Merle Rubin is a contributing writer to Book Review.
IN the years when Germany was besieged by inflation, depression and social unrest, Thomas Mann -- whose active role in defending the beleaguered Weimar Republic would earn him a place on the Nazis' enemies list -- began work on a project that would fill his imagination with images, ideas, sounds and personages from the distant past: his four-novel masterpiece, "Joseph and His Brothers."
BOOKS
October 7, 2001 | RICHARD ZIMLE, Richard Zimler is the author of "The Angelic Darkness" and "The Last Kabbalist of Lisbon."
Has a woman who committed an atrocity in the service of the Third Reich any right to expect understanding from an old lover who hears of the crime's circumstances years later? And if we as readers come to see how a tragic flaw in her character led her to choose evil, can we permit ourselves to feel what was previously unthinkable: sympathy?
BOOKS
January 30, 2000 | JONATHAN LEVI
The little East German town of Altenburg makes an unlikely Peyton Place. When we first come upon it, in Ingo Schulze's "Simple Stories," Altenburg is in the limbo of the spring of 1990. The Berlin Wall has fallen, but the unification of Germany has yet to take place. The first entrepreneurs, like Harry Nelson, have come to town "looking for real estate, and especially for construction sites along the town's access roads. It was all about gas stations."
BOOKS
July 25, 1999 | HARRIET MILLS, Harriet Mills is professor emeritus of Chinese language and literature at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and the daughter of W. Plumer Mills, a member of Nanking's foreign community at the time of Japan's 1937 invasion of China, who suggested the creation of the safety zone
More than 60 years after the worst single city massacre in human history, the Rape of Nanking continues to be a dark chapter in world history. At a time when the international community wrestles over the issues of war crimes and reparations, the deaths of more than 300,000 people in this Chinese city at the hands of the invading Japanese army have provided a shameful example of how not to address crimes against humanity.
BOOKS
March 1, 1998 | FREDERIC MORTON, Frederic Morton is the author of "A Nervous Splendor: Vienna 1888-1889" and "The Rothschilds: A Family Portrait."
Imagine for a moment that Saul Bellow and Herman Wouk had been born in the second half of the 19th century as brothers in a close-knit German family; that throughout their long, productive and prominent careers they had copiously corresponded; that Saul (prose poet of conflicted subjectivity) and Herman (purveyor of a solidly crafted if shallower realism) had both let their affection, vying and percipience flow through their pens at each other; that the exchange reflected not only their
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2010
The Venice Film Festival on Friday honored Hong Kong director John Woo, one of the few Asian filmmakers to enjoy box office success in Hollywood as well as at home. Woo was awarded a lifetime achievement Golden Lion at the world's oldest film festival on the same day it showcased his latest movie, "Reign of Assassins," which he co-directed with Su Chao-Pin and also produced. Woo, 64, has directed more than 26 films in nearly 30 years, beginning his career in Hong Kong in the 1970s before moving to Hollywood in the 1990s.
BOOKS
April 22, 1990 | RICHARD EDER
"A hurricane--a swarm of birds high in the night, a white swarm rushing ever closer, cresting suddenly into a monstrous wave that lunged for the ship. The hurricane--screaming and weeping in the dark below deck and the sour stench of vomit, a dog gone mad in the pitching seas and ripping at a sailor's tendons, spume closing over the torn flesh." With these lines, whose energy is almost equal to what they describe, Christoph Ransmayr begins his powerful allegory of rise, fall and change.
BOOKS
March 1, 1998 | JOYCE CAROL OATES, Joyce Carol Oates, professor of humanities at Princeton University, is the author most recently of the novel "Man Crazy" (Dutton) and an expanded version of "On Boxing" (Ecco Press)
In a fully civilized society, professional boxing would not exist. That it so profitably flourishes in the United States, where purses for highly publicized if unexceptional fights routinely involve millions of dollars, is a testament to both the flawed nature of our society and our dark fascination with this cruelest of sports. These two very different books, both in the way of memoirs by men long involved with boxing, may help to illuminate some of this fascination with what Mike Tyson has eloquently called "the hurt business."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 1996 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pianist John Wood has carried his crusade on behalf of American musical forms and live performance to many an unlikely venue. The 45-year-old keyboardist and founder of the Society for the Rehumanization of American Music has gathered audiences in hotel lounges, intimate recording studios and even his own living room, as well as in a number of Los Angeles clubs, in his attempt to communicate the joys of live music.
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