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John Young

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2001 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With tearful wives and children waving goodbye, the destroyer John Young departed Thursday for the Persian Gulf--prepared to take part in what the ship's captain called "real world events." "Goodbye daddy, please come back safe," sobbed a 3-year-old girl as the Tomahawk missile-equipped ship moved slowly into San Diego Bay for what is scheduled as a six-month mission.
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SPORTS
January 19, 2014 | By Steve Dilbeck
Tom Lasorda recycles more stories than Reader's Digest, but that doesn't mean he still can't come up with a fresh gem. Saturday night at the annual Professional Baseball Scouts Foundation dinner, he was presenting the Tommy Lasorda Managerial Achievement Award to San Francisco's Bruce Bochy when he got off a good one. “When I said my prayers last night, first I asked God for forgiveness,” Lasorda said. “I said, 'Dear Lord, I'm going to have to give a trophy to ... a Giant.'" Bochy, however, was more than up to the task of receiving his award from Lasorda.
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TRAVEL
August 3, 2013 | By Catharine Hamm, Los Angeles Times
When I was at the interview for my Global Entry card - a program that allows faster passage through Customs upon return to the U.S. - one of the last things the Customs and Border Protection officer said before I left was this, "Don't get arrested. " After recent reader letters, I am convinced that this was more than just a throwaway line designed to elicit a smile. If you've been arrested or CBP thinks you have been, your return to this country may be anything but a cakewalk. A July 21 On the Spot column ["At Miami Customs, a Legal Tangle"]
TRAVEL
August 3, 2013 | By Catharine Hamm, Los Angeles Times
When I was at the interview for my Global Entry card - a program that allows faster passage through Customs upon return to the U.S. - one of the last things the Customs and Border Protection officer said before I left was this, "Don't get arrested. " After recent reader letters, I am convinced that this was more than just a throwaway line designed to elicit a smile. If you've been arrested or CBP thinks you have been, your return to this country may be anything but a cakewalk. A July 21 On the Spot column ["At Miami Customs, a Legal Tangle"]
NEWS
May 17, 1989
The destroyer John Young rescued 46 Vietnamese refugees found adrift in a small boat in the South China Sea about 200 miles west of the Philippine island of Luzon, the Navy announced. The John Young and the cruiser Gridley "spotted the craft about 1 a.m. (Philippine time) while en route from Singapore to Subic Bay in the Philippines," said Lt. Cmdr. Bob Anderson of the Pacific Fleet. "Upon investigation, the refugee craft was determined to be unseaworthy--without propulsion and navigation equipment," Anderson said.
BUSINESS
March 12, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Former Hewlett-Packard CEO Denies He Is IBM Candidate: John Young, the former president and chief executive of Hewlett-Packard Co., denied that he is a candidate for the top post at International Business Machines Corp. Young, 60, issued a brief statement through a Hewlett-Packard spokeswoman saying he is "definitely not a candidate for the IBM job." Young is the third business executive this week to say he won't be succeeding John F. Akers as IBM's chief executive.
SPORTS
July 26, 2013 | By Chris Foster
UCLA tight end John Young and offensive tackle Will Oliver have had to end their football careers because of injuries, a person familiar with the situation said Friday. Young, a tight end from Los Angeles Loyola, has battled knee injuries since coming to UCLA in 2010. Oliver, who played at Brentwood (Ca.) Heritage High School, has struggled with injuries to both shoulders. The departures leave UCLA with 84 scholarship players, one under the NCAA limit. ALSO: Pac-12 media day: UCLA is favored to win the South Pac-12 media day: Marqise Lee and Hayes Pullard represent USC Pac-12 media day: Sonny Dykes cautions against player safety assumptions
SPORTS
January 19, 2014 | By Steve Dilbeck
Tom Lasorda recycles more stories than Reader's Digest, but that doesn't mean he still can't come up with a fresh gem. Saturday night at the annual Professional Baseball Scouts Foundation dinner, he was presenting the Tommy Lasorda Managerial Achievement Award to San Francisco's Bruce Bochy when he got off a good one. “When I said my prayers last night, first I asked God for forgiveness,” Lasorda said. “I said, 'Dear Lord, I'm going to have to give a trophy to ... a Giant.'" Bochy, however, was more than up to the task of receiving his award from Lasorda.
SPORTS
May 22, 1990 | GARY KLEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
John Young grew up in South Central Los Angeles at a time when youth baseball flourished in the inner city and youngsters such as Bob Watson, Bobby Tolan and Willie Crawford traveled from sandlot to sandlot perfecting their skills. "There were thousands of leagues," said Young, 41. "You'd play on two or three teams."
SPORTS
July 26, 2013 | By Chris Foster
UCLA tight end John Young and offensive tackle Will Oliver have had to end their football careers because of injuries, a person familiar with the situation said Friday. Young, a tight end from Los Angeles Loyola, has battled knee injuries since coming to UCLA in 2010. Oliver, who played at Brentwood (Ca.) Heritage High School, has struggled with injuries to both shoulders. The departures leave UCLA with 84 scholarship players, one under the NCAA limit. ALSO: Pac-12 media day: UCLA is favored to win the South Pac-12 media day: Marqise Lee and Hayes Pullard represent USC Pac-12 media day: Sonny Dykes cautions against player safety assumptions
BOOKS
August 28, 2005 | Susan Salter Reynolds
"WHY did he die and why didn't we? Why didn't I?" These are a few of the questions that novelist and screenwriter ("The Weather Tomorrow," the television series "China Beach" and "The West Wing") finds himself asking 30 years after his first cousin Doug dies in Vietnam at age 22. Young searches his own memories and those of his relatives, staunch New Englanders and experts in the art of "clamping down on information and emotions."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2001 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With tearful wives and children waving goodbye, the destroyer John Young departed Thursday for the Persian Gulf--prepared to take part in what the ship's captain called "real world events." "Goodbye daddy, please come back safe," sobbed a 3-year-old girl as the Tomahawk missile-equipped ship moved slowly into San Diego Bay for what is scheduled as a six-month mission.
NEWS
May 7, 2000 | MARCIA DUNN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
His commander aimed to go skiing after their space shot. But John Young didn't want R&R. All he wanted was to go back up. As soon as possible. As often as possible. "I'll be ready to go again as soon as I hit the water with Gemini 3," the 34-year-old rookie astronaut promised before blasting off with Gus Grissom on America's first two-man space flight. That was spring 1965.
BUSINESS
March 12, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Former Hewlett-Packard CEO Denies He Is IBM Candidate: John Young, the former president and chief executive of Hewlett-Packard Co., denied that he is a candidate for the top post at International Business Machines Corp. Young, 60, issued a brief statement through a Hewlett-Packard spokeswoman saying he is "definitely not a candidate for the IBM job." Young is the third business executive this week to say he won't be succeeding John F. Akers as IBM's chief executive.
SPORTS
May 22, 1990 | GARY KLEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
John Young grew up in South Central Los Angeles at a time when youth baseball flourished in the inner city and youngsters such as Bob Watson, Bobby Tolan and Willie Crawford traveled from sandlot to sandlot perfecting their skills. "There were thousands of leagues," said Young, 41. "You'd play on two or three teams."
NEWS
December 3, 1988
John Parke Young, an authority on the international monetary system and longtime advocate of a single world currency, is dead at the age of 93. The former chief of the Division of International Finance in the State Department, member of the U.S. committee that drafted the original charters of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank, and author of books still in use by the IMF, died in Pasadena Tuesday.
BOOKS
August 28, 2005 | Susan Salter Reynolds
"WHY did he die and why didn't we? Why didn't I?" These are a few of the questions that novelist and screenwriter ("The Weather Tomorrow," the television series "China Beach" and "The West Wing") finds himself asking 30 years after his first cousin Doug dies in Vietnam at age 22. Young searches his own memories and those of his relatives, staunch New Englanders and experts in the art of "clamping down on information and emotions."
NEWS
May 17, 1989
The destroyer John Young rescued 46 Vietnamese refugees found adrift in a small boat in the South China Sea about 200 miles west of the Philippine island of Luzon, the Navy announced. The John Young and the cruiser Gridley "spotted the craft about 1 a.m. (Philippine time) while en route from Singapore to Subic Bay in the Philippines," said Lt. Cmdr. Bob Anderson of the Pacific Fleet. "Upon investigation, the refugee craft was determined to be unseaworthy--without propulsion and navigation equipment," Anderson said.
NEWS
December 3, 1988
John Parke Young, an authority on the international monetary system and longtime advocate of a single world currency, is dead at the age of 93. The former chief of the Division of International Finance in the State Department, member of the U.S. committee that drafted the original charters of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank, and author of books still in use by the IMF, died in Pasadena Tuesday.
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