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John Z Delorean

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BUSINESS
July 28, 2007 | Martin Zimmerman, Times Staff Writer
Danny Botkin's love affair with the DeLorean got off to an unpromising start. It was the early '80s and a teen-age Botkin was tagging along while his father shopped for a new car. A Ford dealer had a rear-engined, gull-winged DeLorean on display, and the flash of stainless steel automotive skin caught Danny's eye. "I was smitten," Botkin, now 40, recalls. "I said, 'Hey Dad, let's get this.' "He got a Bronco instead." Botkin had to grow up and buy his dream car himself.
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BOOKS
December 22, 1985 | Michael Connor, Connor is a correspondent for ABC News. and
The tale befits a TV soap opera. A poor young man from Detroit rises through the corporate ranks and into the executive suites of General Motors. He develops into a corporate "maverick," combining a flashy personal style with seeming political altruism. He becomes an international entrepreneur. He gets involved with sinister elements. His arrest is broadcast on national TV. It is, of course, the controversial and complicated saga of John Z.
AUTOS
November 19, 2003 | Dan Neil, Times Staff Writer
It was one of the most horrific crashes ever captured on film: The grainy, hidden-video footage of a sweaty John Z. DeLorean, Detroit dream maker and father of the Pontiac GTO, in 1982 wrangling a deal for a suitcase full of cocaine in a Los Angeles hotel room, as part of a fumbled bid to save his nearly bankrupt DeLorean Motor Co. At a stroke, the career of one of Motown's most brilliant and influential executives, an automotive auteur, was entombed in this single, ridiculous image: John Z.
NEWS
October 11, 1985 | From Reuters
Former auto executive John Z. DeLorean's trial on charges that he defrauded investors in his defunct sports car company has been postponed until next April at the earliest, a judge said today. Judge Julian Cook, who will preside at the trial, said in an order that the issues involved in the indictment are so complex that requiring the trial to begin Nov. 18 as originally scheduled could result in a "miscarriage of justice."
NEWS
October 12, 1985 | From Reuters
Former car executive John Z. DeLorean's trial on charges that he defrauded investors in his defunct sports car company has been postponed until next April, a judge said Friday. Judge Julian Cook, who will preside at the trial, said the issues in the indictment are so complex that requiring the trial to begin Nov. 18, as originally scheduled, could result in a "miscarriage of justice."
NEWS
December 19, 1986
Despite a misunderstanding that led jurors to acquit former sports-car maker John Z. DeLorean when some thought him guilty, DeLorean cannot be retried on charges of embezzling $8.5 million from investors, authorities said. The panel's vote stood at 9 to 3 for acquittal through most of the deliberations, said juror Ron Nachtman. A final vote, taken under jurors' understanding that failure to agree on guilt required a verdict of not guilty, was 12 to 0 for acquittal, he said.
BUSINESS
September 12, 1985
Automotive entrepreneur John Z. DeLorean is asking a federal bankruptcy judge to drop the claims against his defunct DeLorean Motor Co., beginning a legal offensive against his critics. The claims were filed in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Detroit by the British government, the French auto maker Renault and William Haddad, a former DeLorean Motor executive, an attorney for DeLorean said. DeLorean Motor went bankrupt in 1982 after producing sports cars for two years in Northern Ireland.
NEWS
June 24, 1985 | Associated Press
Former auto maker John Z. DeLorean and model Cristina Ferrare are expected to testify in court Wednesday in their divorce proceedings. The pretrial hearing will center on whether a New Jersey court is the right one to divide the couple's property as well as the custody of their two children. At stake are a 430-acre estate in the New Jersey community of Bedminster, a 5th Avenue co-op apartment in New York City and property in California, with a total value estimated at more than $10 million.
NEWS
October 1, 1985
Former auto maker John Z. DeLorean pleaded not guilty before a federal magistrate in Detroit to a 15-count criminal indictment charging that he defrauded the investors in his defunct sports car company. DeLorean, 60, was released on a $1-million unsecured bond, and a trial date was set for Nov. 18 in federal court in Detroit. DeLorean was ordered to surrender his passport and report his whereabouts on a weekly basis until his trial begins.
BUSINESS
March 25, 2000 | Associated Press
In the 1960s, John Z. DeLorean was the bad boy of Detroit, a flamboyant young executive seemingly destined to lead General Motors Corp., then the world's biggest industrial company. Now, he has been evicted from his 434-acre estate in the rolling hills of Bedminster, N.J., his home for nearly 20 years. The three-story brick Georgian mansion was sold at a court-ordered bankruptcy auction this year for $15.25 million.
BUSINESS
April 28, 1998 | Bloomberg News
John Z. DeLorean and a company he once owned must pay his former lawyers $4.7 million after the U.S. Supreme Court refused to hear the failed car maker's appeal of a decision awarding the money to Morganroth & Morganroth of Southfield, Mich. The law firm represented DeLorean and his Logan Manufacturing company, now Ecclesiastes 9:10-11-12 Inc., for more than 10 years in criminal cases, divorce proceedings, bankruptcy cases and tax matters. DeLorean, 73, started the DeLorean Motor Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1992
John Z. DeLorean reached a settlement Monday with his former law firm over nearly $700,000 in alleged unpaid legal fees from the successful defense of federal charges in Detroit. Details of the settlement to the Superior Court suit were not released, but an attorney said no money will be changing hands. "No one is paying anybody anything," said attorney Howard Weitzman, a former member of the now-defunct firm that represented DeLorean in the Detroit case.
NEWS
April 17, 1989 | DIANNE KLEIN, Times Staff Writer
"All of that unpleasantness," Cristina Ferrare pronounces, "is behind me." She is sprawling across an upholstered sofa in the study of her Bel-Air home, a stunning 39-year-old woman wearing a big cotton sweater that saw her through her latest pregnancy. Her daughter, Arianna, born less than three weeks earlier, is tucked inside a frilly bassinet, alternating between sleeping and cooing. Cluttering the bookshelves are framed photographs of Ferrare's husband, producer Tony Thomopoulos, herself and the children--counting all the his and hers and theirs, a total of seven.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1992
John Z. DeLorean reached a settlement Monday with his former law firm over nearly $700,000 in alleged unpaid legal fees from the successful defense of federal charges in Detroit. Details of the settlement to the Superior Court suit were not released, but an attorney said no money will be changing hands. "No one is paying anybody anything," said attorney Howard Weitzman, a former member of the now-defunct firm that represented DeLorean in the Detroit case.
BUSINESS
October 23, 1986
Prosecutors called their first witness and submitted documents about John Z. DeLorean's dealings with other auto makers to bolster their charge that DeLorean embezzled $8.9 million from investors. The government's first witness was William Collins, former head of the automotive division for the John DeLorean Co. He testified that he had been unaware of payments to GPD Services, a Swiss company that subcontracted design work for DeLorean to Group Lotus, a British firm.
BUSINESS
July 21, 1988 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
Long before there was John Zachary DeLorean, there was Preston Thomas Tucker. Separated by nearly 40 years of tail fins, chrome and controversy, Tucker and DeLorean were really the same at heart--"car guys," Detroit risk takers with high-octane blood who knew how to hook America into their heroic, ill-starred dreams. Both were cocky and handsome free spirits who briefly caught the nation's fancy with their heady promises to produce the "car of tomorrow, today" for an auto-hungry public.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1988
William Yacobozzi Jr., one of 14 Republican candidates for the 40th Congressional District seat being vacated by Rep. Robert E. Badham (R-Newport Beach), said Tuesday that he will auction off the prototype DeLorean automobile to finance his campaign. Yacobozzi paid $37,000 for the stainless steel car in 1984 and said he expects to get nearly 10 times that at an auction in Universal City this weekend. "There's only one of a kind in the world and that's it," Yacobozzi said.
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