Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJohnathan S Miller
IN THE NEWS

Johnathan S Miller

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 15, 1987 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
Lt. Col. Oliver L. North, acting as unofficial quartermaster for the Nicaraguan resistance, doled out tens of thousands of dollars to contra leaders from his White House safe at a time when the Reagan Administration was prohibited by Congress from assisting the rebels, the man who acted as North's courier told Senate and House investigating committees Thursday. The testimony of Robert W.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 15, 1987 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
Lt. Col. Oliver L. North, acting as unofficial quartermaster for the Nicaraguan resistance, doled out tens of thousands of dollars to contra leaders from his White House safe at a time when the Reagan Administration was prohibited by Congress from assisting the rebels, the man who acted as North's courier told Senate and House investigating committees Thursday. The testimony of Robert W.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 15, 1987 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
The high-flying White House career of Johnathan S. Miller, a conservative lawyer who became a deputy assistant to President Reagan at the age of 33, came to an abrupt end Thursday afternoon in little more than an hour. Miller, the White House director of administration, was watching Congress' Iran- contra hearings on television in his office when he heard himself named as helping Lt. Col. Oliver L. North deliver cash to a Nicaraguan rebel leader. "I was in absolute shock," he said.
NEWS
May 17, 1987 | Associated Press
President Reagan, saying it is "awfully easy to be a little short of memory," said Friday that he may have discussed a plan to pay people to rescue American hostages in Lebanon, but he added, "I've never thought of that as ransom." The once-secret program has been described in congressional testimony as an operation using federal drug agents to pay bribes and a $2-million ransom to win the hostages' release.
NEWS
July 24, 1987 | SARA FRITZ and NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writers
Secretary of State George P. Shultz, in an unusual public confession, told the congressional Iran- contra committees Thursday that he has offered his resignation to President Reagan at least three times as a result of friction with the CIA and White House staff. All three of Shultz's resignation offers were rejected by Reagan, according to his testimony, and each actually seemed to result in an improvement in the working relationship between the President and the secretary of state.
NEWS
October 5, 1987 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
The State Department ran an illegal, covert domestic propaganda campaign in 1985 that secretly produced articles for the opinion pages of leading newspapers criticizing Nicaragua's leftist government, according to a congressional report released Sunday.
NEWS
June 4, 1987 | SARA FRITZ and KAREN TUMULTY, Times Staff Writers
Assistant Secretary of State Elliott Abrams was warned by members of Congress on Wednesday that he seems to have been selected as one of the Reagan Administration's "designated fall guys" who will be forced to resign to pay for the Iran- contra scandal. In Abrams' second day of questioning by the Iran-contra committee, several members suggested that the brash assistant secretary for Latin American affairs was being "hung out to dry" by Administration officials. And Sen. David L.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|