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Johnette Napolitano

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1994 | RICHARD CROMELIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Johnette Napolitano, one of the most fiery and colorful figures on L.A.'s rock scene for a decade, is closing the book on Concrete Blonde. The trio plays the Wiltern Theatre on Saturday, then returns there March 10 for a farewell show . The band's often turbulent music succeeded X's as the rock chronicle of Los Angeles' state of mind.
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NEWS
June 17, 2004 | Patrick Day
Johnette NAPOLITANO, singer for the band Concrete Blonde, was born in Hollywood but makes her home in the desert near Joshua Tree National Park. Her group, which scored a radio hit in the early '90s with "Joey," broke up in 1994 and reunited in 2001. Its latest album, "Mojave," will be released June 29. Right to work I love weekends because everyone else is doing something and I can get work done. I know everybody will leave me alone.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1998 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As a member of Concrete Blonde and her offshoot band, Pretty & Twisted, Johnette Napolitano endured internal shake-ups at both Capitol and Warner Bros. Her luck with labels has been so bad that her close friends joke about it: "If you want company turmoil or executive turnover, sign Johnette." The veteran singer-songwriter's situation looked good when Island Records signed her last year. But the Johnette jinx struck again. Chris Blackwell, who had signed Napolitano to a solo deal, left Island.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2002
Lyn Henderson Moran blames activist groups like NOW for "letting" the entertainment media freeze out older women (Letters, Oct. 6). That makes about as much sense as blaming the NAACP for decades of black movie roles limited to Butterfly McQueens and Stepin Fetchits. If Moran needs a culprit, she should look instead at Hollywood's near-total enslavement to demographics -- forcing everyone, regardless of age or taste, to endure entertainment designed primarily to appeal to 15- to 29-year-old men. Bonnie Sloane Los Angeles Moran declares that the day will never come when an old-looking actress holds a leading romantic role on either screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1995 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Johnette Napolitano says she didn't have a parachute, let alone know what color it was, when she bailed out of Concrete Blonde early in 1994. All she had was a strong feeling that she needed a change after nine years fronting one of the era's most esteemed and artistically rewarding L.A.-based rock bands.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1992 | RICHARD CROMELIN, Richard Cromelin writes about pop music for The Times
Johnette Napolitano points to her living room window overlooking a raucous stretch of Sunset Boulevard in Silver Lake. "That window there, at night on Fridays and Saturdays, it's unbelievable," says Napolitano, leader of the trio Concrete Blonde, the band that succeeded X as the premier rock chronicler of L.A.'s psychological terrain. "It's like, well, keep the lights off and stay low kind of thing. It's a drag. From this window I can see a lot of stuff go down.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1987
Thanks to Chris Willman for listening to us all year--and especially thanks for hearing us ("Johnette Napolitano: A Tough 'n' Tender Rockin' Dude," Dec. 20). But . . . (drummer) Harry's gonna kill me if he comes back after Xmas in Chicago and his last name is wrong. Please hurry. It is RUSHAKOFF , not Stinson, but hey, Chris, I couldn't care less! JOHNETTE NAPOLITANO Concrete Blonde
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1996
Johnette Napolitano has signed on as lead singer for the Heads--a group featuring former Talking Heads members Tina Weymouth, Chris Franz and Jerry Harrison (but not David Byrne)--for a tour in the fall. An album by the group, with a rotating cast of vocalists (including Deborah Harry, Michael Hutchence and Live's Ed Kowalczyk) is due next month. Former Concrete Blonde leader Napolitano will also continue her own projects, including a planned solo album.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2002
Lyn Henderson Moran blames activist groups like NOW for "letting" the entertainment media freeze out older women (Letters, Oct. 6). That makes about as much sense as blaming the NAACP for decades of black movie roles limited to Butterfly McQueens and Stepin Fetchits. If Moran needs a culprit, she should look instead at Hollywood's near-total enslavement to demographics -- forcing everyone, regardless of age or taste, to endure entertainment designed primarily to appeal to 15- to 29-year-old men. Bonnie Sloane Los Angeles Moran declares that the day will never come when an old-looking actress holds a leading romantic role on either screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1989 | STEVE HOCHMAN
This L.A. trio's best songs are fragmentation bombs ready to explode--churning emotions and doubts at the center, with a hard, brittle exterior. So why doesn't the group's second album leave you picking shrapnel out of your ears? Is it just because the production (by the band) is flat? Or because Jim Mankey's guitar playing is tame and predictable? Or because Johnette Napolitano's emotions are a bit mushy? In recent concerts, these same songs had heart and explosive firepower. Napolitano gave them effectively sharp-edged treatment, with Mankey, drummer Harry Rushakoff and new bassist Alan Bloch following suit.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1998 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As a member of Concrete Blonde and her offshoot band, Pretty & Twisted, Johnette Napolitano endured internal shake-ups at both Capitol and Warner Bros. Her luck with labels has been so bad that her close friends joke about it: "If you want company turmoil or executive turnover, sign Johnette." The veteran singer-songwriter's situation looked good when Island Records signed her last year. But the Johnette jinx struck again. Chris Blackwell, who had signed Napolitano to a solo deal, left Island.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1996
Johnette Napolitano has signed on as lead singer for the Heads--a group featuring former Talking Heads members Tina Weymouth, Chris Franz and Jerry Harrison (but not David Byrne)--for a tour in the fall. An album by the group, with a rotating cast of vocalists (including Deborah Harry, Michael Hutchence and Live's Ed Kowalczyk) is due next month. Former Concrete Blonde leader Napolitano will also continue her own projects, including a planned solo album.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1995 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Johnette Napolitano says she didn't have a parachute, let alone know what color it was, when she bailed out of Concrete Blonde early in 1994. All she had was a strong feeling that she needed a change after nine years fronting one of the era's most esteemed and artistically rewarding L.A.-based rock bands.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1994 | RICHARD CROMELIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Johnette Napolitano, one of the most fiery and colorful figures on L.A.'s rock scene for a decade, is closing the book on Concrete Blonde. The trio plays the Wiltern Theatre on Saturday, then returns there March 10 for a farewell show . The band's often turbulent music succeeded X's as the rock chronicle of Los Angeles' state of mind.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1992 | RICHARD CROMELIN, Richard Cromelin writes about pop music for The Times
Johnette Napolitano points to her living room window overlooking a raucous stretch of Sunset Boulevard in Silver Lake. "That window there, at night on Fridays and Saturdays, it's unbelievable," says Napolitano, leader of the trio Concrete Blonde, the band that succeeded X as the premier rock chronicler of L.A.'s psychological terrain. "It's like, well, keep the lights off and stay low kind of thing. It's a drag. From this window I can see a lot of stuff go down.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 1991 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Johnette Napolitano and Andy Prieboy should take their show off the road immediately--and put it in some cozy cabaret, where it could become a running attraction to be savored again and again.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1990 | CHRIS WILLMAN
If Concrete Blonde's thrasher of a signature number, "Still in Hollywood," seemed even more robust than usual at the climax of the band's Palace show on Sunday, the fact that its refrain no longer rings true for its singer may account for some of the vigor. "Thought I'd be out of here by now," griped leader Johnette Napolitano, as always. Never mind that she has gotten out of here, having finally moved from Hollywood to Europe last year.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1989 | MIKE BOEHM, Times Staff Writer
The ability to be an on-stage dynamo, a nonstop motion machine, is a hallmark of great pop performance, and Johnette Napolitano scored well above average on the Mick Jagger-James Brown perpetual motion meter as she fronted the Los Angeles band Concrete Blonde at the Coach House in San Juan Capistrano on Thursday night. But for all of her energetic display--not to mention her adventurous, emotionally committed singing--Concrete Blonde's set had more than a few dull moments. To have full effect, dynamic singing and movement needs the support of energized playing.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1991 | MIKE BOEHM
Johnette Napolitano and Andy Prieboy have toured together and recorded together, which is hardly surprising for two artistically compatible singers who came out of the same '80s Los Angeles alternative-rock scene. Since last year, they also have been getting some of the same outraged mail. The cause is "Tomorrow Wendy," one of the most striking rock ballads of 1990.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1990 | CHRIS WILLMAN
If Concrete Blonde's thrasher of a signature number, "Still in Hollywood," seemed even more robust than usual at the climax of the band's Palace show on Sunday, the fact that its refrain no longer rings true for its singer may account for some of the vigor. "Thought I'd be out of here by now," griped leader Johnette Napolitano, as always. Never mind that she has gotten out of here, having finally moved from Hollywood to Europe last year.
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