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Johnnie Johnson

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SPORTS
January 10, 1990 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Rams reached into their golden oldies pile Tuesday and plucked out a hit from the 1980s, safety Johnnie Johnson, who agreed to terms on a two-game contract. What? Why? How? Johnson, 33, was left unprotected by the Rams after the 1988 season and signed as a Plan B free agent with the Seattle Seahawks, who released him after two games this season.
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SPORTS
February 6, 2013 | By Chris Foster
UCLA lost three senior starters from the defensive secondary, and it was not a unit that overly distinguished itself in 2012. Help is on the way. Defensive backs Tahaan Goodman and Johnny Johnson have signed letter of intents to play for the Bruins. GRAPHIC: UCLA recruits Goodman, a safety from Rancho Cucamonga High School, is ranked seventh at his position by Scout.com and ninth by Rivals.com. Johnson, a cornerback from Fresno Central High School, is ranked eighth at his position by Scout.com.
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SPORTS
September 27, 1989 | From Times wire services
Free safety Johnnie Johnson, the last of nine Plan B free agents signed by Seattle who remained on the Seahawks' roster, was placed on waivers today. Johnson, 32, a nine-year starter for the Rams who received a $50,000 signing bonus March 23, is being replaced by safety David Hollis, who has been on and off the Seattle roster for the past three seasons. The moves, disclosed by the two players' agents, were confirmed by Coach Chuck Knox. "We were trying to shore up our special teams," Knox said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2005 | Randy Lewis, Times Staff Writer
Johnnie Johnson, the St. Louis pianist whose popular early-1950s trio was the launching pad for a young guitarist named Chuck Berry and who played a key role in the sound of Berry's genre-defining hits, such as "Rock and Roll Music" and "Roll Over Beethoven," died Wednesday. He was 80. He died of natural causes, his publicist said. A friend said he had been hospitalized last month with pneumonia and was on dialysis for a kidney ailment. One of Berry's best-known songs, "Johnny B.
SPORTS
March 23, 1989 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, Times Staff Writer
The winds of change, blowing briskly through Anaheim these days, swept out another Ram Wednesday when veteran free safety Johnnie Johnson announced that he was taking the money and running his 32-year-old body to the Seattle Seahawks. Johnson, a nine-year veteran and a mainstay of the Ram secondary for nearly a decade, has agreed to terms with the Seahawks on a two-year contract.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1992 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Though sometimes forgotten after three decades of the electric guitar being the world's dominant noisemaker, the piano also played a strong role in American blues music. Concurrent with Robert Johnson and other Delta guitarists of the '30s, more-citified players developed rich, inventive styles on piano, such as the great, rolling boogie-woogie key pumping of Kansas City's Pete Johnson.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Johnnie Johnson, who shot down 38 enemy aircraft, making him the Royal Air Force's top gun in World War II, has died. Johnson died Tuesday at his home in Buxton in Derbyshire after an illness, said his friend, retired Air Chief Marshal Sir Christopher Foxley-Norris. He was 85. Johnson's career began inauspiciously. At first rejected by the Auxiliary Air Force, he joined the RAF Volunteer Reserves in the summer of 1940. He crashed a Spitfire on his fourth flight.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2005 | Randy Lewis, Times Staff Writer
Johnnie Johnson, the St. Louis pianist whose popular early-1950s trio was the launching pad for a young guitarist named Chuck Berry and who played a key role in the sound of Berry's genre-defining hits, such as "Rock and Roll Music" and "Roll Over Beethoven," died Wednesday. He was 80. He died of natural causes, his publicist said. A friend said he had been hospitalized last month with pneumonia and was on dialysis for a kidney ailment. One of Berry's best-known songs, "Johnny B.
SPORTS
September 10, 1986 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, Times Staff Writer
Security is a thing some find in a blanket, others in a savings account. Defensive backs, Johnnie Johnson can tell you, never quite have it. They are unlike businessmen who can climb their way to the top and then take three-hour lunches the rest of their lives. Johnson can tell you a thing or two about job security. He was once a star safety for the Rams and better known in sports jargon as a mainstay or fixture in the secondary, a rock , if you prefer.
NEWS
September 24, 1993 | STEVE APPLEFORD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Steve Appleford writes regularly about music for The Times. and
The man had finally arrived to work up some blues with the Kentucky Headhunters last year. Johnnie Johnson had already made his reputation as one of the architects of Chuck Berry's rock 'n' roll blueprint, and was joining this group of country rockers for an album collaboration called "That'll Work."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Johnnie Johnson, who shot down 38 enemy aircraft, making him the Royal Air Force's top gun in World War II, has died. Johnson died Tuesday at his home in Buxton in Derbyshire after an illness, said his friend, retired Air Chief Marshal Sir Christopher Foxley-Norris. He was 85. Johnson's career began inauspiciously. At first rejected by the Auxiliary Air Force, he joined the RAF Volunteer Reserves in the summer of 1940. He crashed a Spitfire on his fourth flight.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1998 | Steve Hochman
Gubernatorial candidates Jane Harman and Al Checchi aren't the only ones putting personal fortunes into a campaign these days. Business executive George Turek is bankrolling a candidate for election as well. But rather than political office, this is a campaign for a spot in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame for Chuck Berry's pianist, Johnnie Johnson.
SPORTS
April 28, 1998 | DAVE McKIBBEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He looks as though he could still play some safety, but Johnnie Johnson releases his aggressions on a tennis ball these days. He finds competition not in shutting down No. 80 in a red and white jersey, but in opening up young people's minds to new horizons. "The greatest satisfaction I enjoyed was playing football," Johnson said. "I didn't know if there was anything that could give me that same satisfaction. My work with young kids comes as close to that feeling as anything."
SPORTS
February 7, 1998
Bob Boone, Bob Boyd, Steve DeBerg, Debbie Green, Johnnie Johnson, Dan Quisenberry and Leon Wood will bring to 86 the number of inductees into the Orange County Sports Hall of Fame when they are enshrined in ceremonies on April 30. Boone caught a major-league record 2,264 games in his 19-year major league career, seven of which were with the Angels. The six-time Gold Glove Award winner and Villa Park resident is a scout for the Cincinnati Reds.
NEWS
February 2, 1997 | DINAH WISENBERG BRIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Brokenhearted over a woman, Johnny Jay Johnson spent all his money on a bus ticket from Virginia and rolled into town five years ago in tears, planning to kill himself. Today, he's married, owns a two-bedroom house, works as a salesman, invests at a brokerage house and preaches positive thinking and self-discipline, sounding not unlike the speakers on motivational tapes he listens to daily. Now 40, he's confident he'll reach his goal of having $2 million by the time he's 54.
SPORTS
January 14, 1997 | MIKE PENNER
What: "Personal Approach--A Game Plan for Unlimited Success," by Johnnie Johnson. Price: $22.95 (Dove Books). Self-help gurus can be dangerous. Take, for example, the Kings, who find themselves in their sorry current state largely because Barry Melrose listened to Anthony Robbins, who advised Melrose to awaken the giant within, confront his inner demons with hair gel and trade all of his superstar scorers for plodding grinders who have no idea how to awaken the red light within the Forum.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1992 | RICHARD CROMELIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Lots of musicians would consider it a career highlight to play with a musical legend, but pianist Johnnie Johnson has done it at opposite ends of a 40-plus-year career. In 1952, he hired a local singer-guitarist in St. Louis to fill out his trio for a New Year's Eve show: Chuck Berry. In late 1990, he recorded his first major-label album, "Johnnie B. Bad," for Elektra's American Explorer series, and a couple of rock guitarists pitched in: Keith Richards and Eric Clapton.
NEWS
November 12, 1992 | MIKE BOEHM, Mike Boehm covers pop music for The Times Orange County Edition.
Think of Chuck Berry and what comes to mind are a brash guitar style that transformed popular music, lyrics informed by an observant eye and a wry sense of humor, and a showman's flair. But listen to Berry's records, and the ear is drawn as well to Berry's unassuming piano sidekick, Johnnie Johnson.
NEWS
September 24, 1993 | STEVE APPLEFORD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Steve Appleford writes regularly about music for The Times. and
The man had finally arrived to work up some blues with the Kentucky Headhunters last year. Johnnie Johnson had already made his reputation as one of the architects of Chuck Berry's rock 'n' roll blueprint, and was joining this group of country rockers for an album collaboration called "That'll Work."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1992 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Though sometimes forgotten after three decades of the electric guitar being the world's dominant noisemaker, the piano also played a strong role in American blues music. Concurrent with Robert Johnson and other Delta guitarists of the '30s, more-citified players developed rich, inventive styles on piano, such as the great, rolling boogie-woogie key pumping of Kansas City's Pete Johnson.
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