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Johnnie Ray

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1990 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
At just under 24 minutes, "The Best of Johnnie Ray" must be one of the shortest compact discs in existence. But the key tunes in the nine-song Columbia Records collection showcase the contributions of a man whose place in rock history has been greatly under-appreciated. Ray served as a small yet significant bridge between the smooth, generally formal pop style of the '40s and the more intense and informal approach that would characterize the late-'50s rock revolution. Ray, who died Feb.
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BUSINESS
December 2, 2006 | Lorenza Munoz, Times Staff Writer
Johnny Ray Gasca, whose thriving bootleg film business earned him the nickname "Prince of Piracy," was sentenced Friday to seven years in federal prison for illegally taping movies in theaters and other crimes. The sentence from U.S. District Judge Dean D. Pregerson in Los Angeles marks one of the most significant victories for the government and Hollywood studios in the stepped-up battle against movie bootlegs.
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NEWS
February 25, 1990 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Johnnie Ray, the balladeer of tears who brought an emotional intensity to music that was singular to his era, died Saturday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. The performer, once dubbed "The Prince of Wails" for his impassioned renditions of such songs as "Cry" and "Please Mr. Sun," was 63 and died of liver failure at 4 p.m., Cedars-Sinai spokesman Ron Wise said. "He has been in and out of the hospital for the last three months" and lapsed into a coma Feb. 14, Wise said.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Johnny Ray Gasca, a Los Angeles resident whom the FBI has called the poster boy of movie piracy, said taping movies in theaters wasn't illegal at the time he was arrested. Gasca, 35, is accused of taping movies, including Sony Pictures' "Anger Management," at screenings before they were released and selling copies he made over the Internet. Piracy costs the movie industry about $3.5 billion a year in lost business, according to the Motion Picture Assn. of America.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1987 | JACK HAWN
Johnnie Ray is shedding no tears about hitting "the Big Six-O" a few weeks ago (Jan. 10), but he admits his eyes still well up now and then when he croons two of his biggest hits of yesteryear, "Cry" and "The Little White Cloud That Cried," which he wrote. "It depends on my attitude," he said the other day. "You can only go so far with an audience and then they become embarrassed." Once dubbed "Mr.
SPORTS
February 1, 1987 | Associated Press
Johnny Ray, who led the Pittsburgh Pirates with a .301 batting average, has been named the 1986 winner of the Roberto Clemente Award presented by Pittsburgh's Baseball Writers of America chapter. The award is given annually to the Pirates' player who best exemplifies the baseball standards of excellence achieved by Clemente, a Hall of Fame outfielder. Ray finished seventh in the National League in batting (.301), was tied for seventh in hits (174) and was tied for ninth in doubles (33).
SPORTS
April 26, 1989 | ROBYN NORWOOD, Times Staff Writer
Injuries are part of the game, Johnny Ray said. It is just that they had not been part of his game. His only stint on the disabled list in a career of more than seven years began April 6, only two games into the start of this new season. After 15 days on the DL, Ray has been back in the starting lineup the past two games, and he offers this one-word review of the DL: "Boring." Nothing much to do but stare at a sprained left wrist and urge it to get better. Nothing better to do during games than watch for tendencies of opposing pitchers he would not face that day. Ray was 0 for 9 in the first two games of the season.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2004 | Lorenza Munoz and Li Fellers, Times Staff Writers
Like countless other dreamers, Johnny Ray Gasca came to Hollywood with a screenplay to pitch and a list of moguls to schmooze. Unlike most of the others, he quickly grabbed the movie industry's attention -- but maybe not quite the way he had in mind. Gasca, a Bronx native and convicted felon, is believed to be the first person charged in federal court with violating copyright laws by videotaping movies at pre-release screenings.
BUSINESS
December 2, 2006 | Lorenza Munoz, Times Staff Writer
Johnny Ray Gasca, whose thriving bootleg film business earned him the nickname "Prince of Piracy," was sentenced Friday to seven years in federal prison for illegally taping movies in theaters and other crimes. The sentence from U.S. District Judge Dean D. Pregerson in Los Angeles marks one of the most significant victories for the government and Hollywood studios in the stepped-up battle against movie bootlegs.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2004 | Lorenza Munoz and Li Fellers, Times Staff Writers
Like countless other dreamers, Johnny Ray Gasca came to Hollywood with a screenplay to pitch and a list of moguls to schmooze. Unlike most of the others, he quickly grabbed the movie industry's attention -- but maybe not quite the way he had in mind. Gasca, a Bronx native and convicted felon, is believed to be the first person charged in federal court with violating copyright laws by videotaping movies at pre-release screenings.
SPORTS
May 26, 1990 | ELLIOTT TEAFORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All Johnny Ray really wanted Friday afternoon was to grab a snack and some peace and quiet before the Angels' game with the Milwaukee Brewers. But Ray was in demand. A television station wanted the Angel second baseman to appear during its newscast. Live. A newspaper reporter had been badgering him for a few moments of his time. It's that way when you've had a dramatic two-week turnaround the way Ray has.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1990 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
At just under 24 minutes, "The Best of Johnnie Ray" must be one of the shortest compact discs in existence. But the key tunes in the nine-song Columbia Records collection showcase the contributions of a man whose place in rock history has been greatly under-appreciated. Ray served as a small yet significant bridge between the smooth, generally formal pop style of the '40s and the more intense and informal approach that would characterize the late-'50s rock revolution. Ray, who died Feb.
NEWS
February 25, 1990 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Johnnie Ray, the balladeer of tears who brought an emotional intensity to music that was singular to his era, died Saturday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. The performer, once dubbed "The Prince of Wails" for his impassioned renditions of such songs as "Cry" and "Please Mr. Sun," was 63 and died of liver failure at 4 p.m., Cedars-Sinai spokesman Ron Wise said. "He has been in and out of the hospital for the last three months" and lapsed into a coma Feb. 14, Wise said.
SPORTS
April 26, 1989 | ROBYN NORWOOD, Times Staff Writer
Injuries are part of the game, Johnny Ray said. It is just that they had not been part of his game. His only stint on the disabled list in a career of more than seven years began April 6, only two games into the start of this new season. After 15 days on the DL, Ray has been back in the starting lineup the past two games, and he offers this one-word review of the DL: "Boring." Nothing much to do but stare at a sprained left wrist and urge it to get better. Nothing better to do during games than watch for tendencies of opposing pitchers he would not face that day. Ray was 0 for 9 in the first two games of the season.
SPORTS
May 26, 1990 | ELLIOTT TEAFORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All Johnny Ray really wanted Friday afternoon was to grab a snack and some peace and quiet before the Angels' game with the Milwaukee Brewers. But Ray was in demand. A television station wanted the Angel second baseman to appear during its newscast. Live. A newspaper reporter had been badgering him for a few moments of his time. It's that way when you've had a dramatic two-week turnaround the way Ray has.
SPORTS
February 1, 1987 | Associated Press
Johnny Ray, who led the Pittsburgh Pirates with a .301 batting average, has been named the 1986 winner of the Roberto Clemente Award presented by Pittsburgh's Baseball Writers of America chapter. The award is given annually to the Pirates' player who best exemplifies the baseball standards of excellence achieved by Clemente, a Hall of Fame outfielder. Ray finished seventh in the National League in batting (.301), was tied for seventh in hits (174) and was tied for ninth in doubles (33).
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